Zur Fahre 10

Ahlden, Germany

Zur Fahre 10

Ahlden, Germany
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Bruce M.,P.O. Box 180 | Bahr N.,Zur Fahre 10 | David N.,Apt Therapeutics, Inc.
Bulletin of the British Ornithologists' Club | Year: 2016

The recent split of the genus Gallicolumba prompted a reassessment of its synonymy, revealing that Pampusana Bonaparte, 1855, is available to replace both Alopecoenas and subgenus Terricolumba, while Pampusanna Pucheran, 1854, is a synonym of Gallicolumba. We also show that the original publications of their type species should be shifted, from Columba pampusan Quoy & Gaimard, 1824, to Columba Pampusan Gaimard, 1823, in Pampusana and Pampusanna criniger Pucheran, 1853 [= 1854] to Peristera crinigera Reichenbach, 1851, in Pampusanna. The index pages of Reichenbach (1851) are very rare and a copy is reproduced herein, along with two plate variations demonstrating that despite frequent reference to plates and figures in Reichenbach's earlier works, new names there are based on the index pages intended to accompany the plates, and that any captions on plates were handwritten. Additional names also required earlier citations and other errors and oversights are documented, as well as bibliographical corrections and clarifications.


Martens J.,Institute For Zoologie | Bahr N.,Zur Fahre 10
Vogelwarte | Year: 2013

This report is the seventh one of a series and presents the results of a comprehensive literature screening in search for new bird taxa described in 2011, namely new genera, species and subspecies worldwide. We tracked names of three genera, four species and eight subspecies names new to science which according to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature were correctly described. New genera were erected for species or species groups, respectively, of the Rallidae, Meliphagidae, and Emberizidae. One of the new species refer to Passeriformes and three to Non-Passeriformes, a shearwater, a hummingbird, and a rail. The distributional areas of the new species often are minute, restricted to remote and difficult to access areas and were hitherto overlooked due to their similarity to closely related species. Due to their limited ranges species new to science are often already endangered when detected. In several cases the populations in question now considered to present a new species were known since long. But only substantial studies of their songs, genetics and/or ecology led to description of new formerly cryptic species. In a zoogeographic context most of the new taxa, species and subspecies, originate from the Neotropics (4), followed by Australasia, Palaearctic (2 each), North Pacific Islands (1), Indo-Malaya (1) and Afrotropics including Madagascar (1). In a taxon sequence by genus/species/subspecies the newly described taxa have following origin: Neotropis (-/2/2), Australasia (1/-/2), Palaearctic (1/-/2), Nearctic (1/-/1), Indo-Malaya (-/-/1), North Pacific (-/1/-) and Afrotropic regions (-/1/-). New names were proposed for a subspecies of a neotropical nightjar, a palaearctic falcon, a South American ovenbird and a thrush from the Caribbean, respectively. A number of splits - namely those of known species into allospecies as the geographic representatives of a superspecies - are also addressed. But we restrict the treatment of these splits to the Palaearctic and Indo-Malayan regions. Under the rules of the 'scoring method' of Tobias and co-authors, generally working on morphological traits the number of species splits presented by a single author increased considerably. We suggest possible flaws in new descriptions and certain splits, regardless of the species concept addressed. However, in general this report should be taken as a documentation of new taxa, not as a critical review of recent changes in bird taxonomy and bird descriptions. © DO-G, IfV.MPG 2013.


Martens J.,Institute For Zoologie | Bahr N.,Zur Fahre 10
Vogelwarte | Year: 2014

This report is the eighth one of a series and presents the results of a comprehensive literature screening in search for new bird taxa described in 2012, namely new genera, species and subspecies worldwide. We tracked names of seven genera, six species and five subspecies names new to science which, according to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature were correctly described. On the basis of molecular genetic analysis three new families were erected within the superfamily Sylvioidea, new genera for species or species groups, respectively, of the Accipitridae, two within Thamnophilidae, Tyrannidae, Timaliidae, Petroicidae and Fringillidae. Three each of the new species described refer to Passeriformes and to Non-Passeriformes. The distributional areas of the new species often are minute, restricted to remote and difficult to access areas and were hitherto overlooked due to their similarity to closely related species. Due to their limited ranges species new to science are often already endangered when detected. In several cases like the Ninox owls of the Philippines, the populations in question now considered to present a new species were known since long. But only substantial studies of their songs, genetics and/or ecology led to description of new formerly unrecognized species. In a Zoogeographic context most of the new taxa, species and subspecies, originate from Palaearctic (8), followed by the Neotropics (7) and Indo-Malaya (3). In a taxon sequence by genus/species/subspecies the newly described taxa have following origin: Neotropics (3/4/3), Palaearctic (2/-/8), Indo-Malaya (1/2/1) and Australasia (1/-/-). New names were proposed for a S American hummingbird genus (already in 2008), an East palearctic buzzard, a palearctic plover and an African finch. A number of splits - namely those of known species into allospecies as the geographic representatives of a superspecies - are also addressed. But we restrict the treatment of these splits to the Palaearctic and Indo-Malayan regions. Splits markedly influenced species numbers in Chloropseidae (Leafbirds), Irenidae (Fairy bluebirds) and in the parrot genus Prioniturus (Racquet-tails). We suggest possible flaws in new descriptions and certain splits, regardless of the species concept addressed. However, in general this report should be taken as a documentation of new taxa, not as a critical review of recent changes in bird taxonomy and bird descriptions.


Martens J.,Institute For Zoologie | Bahr N.,Zur Fahre 10
Vogelwarte | Year: 2011

This report is the fifth one of a series and presents the results of a comprehensive literature screening in search for new bird taxa described in 2009, namely new genera, species and subspecies worldwide. We tracked six genera, six species and six subspecies names new to science which according to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature were correctly described. One new family was erected (Pnoepygidae, out of Timaliidae) and two former families (Sylviidae and Timaliidae) were strongly modified. New genera were erected for species or species groups, respectively, of the Accipitridae (two), Tyrannidae, Furnariidae, Paradoxornithidae and Fringillidae (one each). Five of the new species refer to Passeriformes and one to Non-Passeres, a hummingbird. The distributional areas of the new species often are minute, restricted to remote and difficult to access areas and were hitherto overlooked. In several cases the populations in question were known since long. But only substantial studies of their songs, genetics and/or ecology their remarkable acoustical and genetic or ecological properties (in the case of the new crossbill) led to description of new species. In a Zoogeographic context most of the new taxa originate from the Neotropics, followed by Indomalayan and Holarctic regions. The remainder of taxa are scattered over Pacific islands and the Afrotropics. In a taxon sequence by genus/species/ subspecies the newly described taxa have following origin: Neotropis and Caribbean (4/2/3), Palearctic (-/-/1), Indo-Malaya (1/2/2), Nearctic (-/1/-), Afrotropics (-/1/-), Pacific Islands (1/-/-). New names were proposed for a Neotropical genus, a Nearctic species, and two subspecies, one each from the Palearctic and the Indo-Malayan regions, respectively. A number of splits - namely those of known species into allospecies as the geographic representatives of a superspecies - are also addressed. But we restrict the treatment of these splits to the Palearctic and Indo-Malayan regions. We suggest possible flaws in new descriptions and certain splits, regardless of the species concept addressed. However, in general this report should be taken as a documentation of new taxa, not as a critical review of recent changes in bird taxonomy and bird descriptions. © DO-G, IfV, MPG 2011.


Martens J.,Institute For Zoologie | Bahr N.,Zur Fahre 10
Vogelwarte | Year: 2015

This report is the ninth one of a series and presents the results of a comprehensive literature screening in search for new bird taxa described in 2013, namely new genera, species and subspecies worldwide. We tracked names of ten genera, 25 species and three subspecies (one additional for 2010) new to science which, according to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature were correctly described. On the basis of molecular genetic analyses new genera for species or species groups were proposed within Columbidae (2), Pipridae (1), and Thamnophilidae (7). Though various species concepts are concerned and "species" may have differing biological meanings, the number of 25 new bird species described in a single year is extraordinarily high. It is unsurpassed at least within the last hundred years. The new species refer to Hydrobatidae (1), Tytonidae (1), Strigidae (2), Bucconidae (1), Tyrannidae (1), Pipromorphidae (2), Thamnophilidae (5), Rhinocryptidae (1), Dendrocolaptidae (4), Furnariidae (1), Corvidae (1), Cisticolidae (1), Timaliidae (1), Polioptilidae (1), Passerellidae (1), and Thraupidae (1). Five of the new species described refer to Non-Passeriformes, the remainder 20 species to Passeriformes. In several cases the populations in question now considered to represent a new species were known since long. But only substantial studies of their songs, genetics and/or ecology led to description of new formerly unrecognized species. Most cases refer to the Neotropics.The distributional areas of the new species often are minute, restricted to remote and difficultly to access areas, often small islands and were hitherto overlooked due to their similarity to closely related species. Due to their limited ranges species new to science are often already endangered when detected. In a taxon sequence by genus/species/subspecies the newly described taxa have following origin: Neotropics (10/20/2), Palaearctic (-/1/2; one already in 2010) and Indo-Malaya (0/4/0). A number of splits, namely those of known species into allospecies as the geographic representatives of a superspecies are also addressed, but these are restricted to the Palaearctic and Indo-Malayan regions. Such splits markedly influenced species numbers especially in the Alcedinidae (kingfishers, Ceyx) and in the Pycnonotidae (bulbuls, Thapsinillas). We discuss possible flaws in new descriptions and certain splits, regardless of the species concept addressed. However, in general this report should be taken as a documentation of new taxa, not as a critical review of recent changes in bird taxonomy and bird descriptions. © DO-G, IfV, MPG 2015.


Martens J.,Institute For Zoologie | Bahr N.,Zur Fahre 10
Vogelwarte | Year: 2010

This report is the forth one of a series; this Part 1 presents the results of a comprehensive literature screening in search for new bird taxa described in 2008, namely new genera, species and subspecies worldwide. We tracked four new genera, eight new species, 17 subspecies new to science which according to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature were correctly described. New genera were erected for species or species groups, respectively, of the Rhinocryptidae, Cisticolidae and Parulidae. Six of the new species refer to Passeriformes and two to Non-Passeres, a storm-petrel and a parrot. The distributional areas of the new species often are minute, restricted to remote areas and were hitherto overlooked. In several cases the populations in question were known since long but their remarkable acoustical and genetic properties which led to description of new species were unexplored. In a Zoogeographic context most of the new taxa originate from the Neotropics, followed by Palaerctic and Indomalayan Realms. The remainder of taxa are scattered over Australasia, the Afrotropics, and the southern Atlantic islands. In a taxon sequence by genus/species/subspecies there is the following distribution: Neotropis and Caribbean (1/2/8), Palaerctic (-/2/4), Indo-Malaya (-/2/2), Nearctic (2/-/1), Afrotropics (1/1/-), Australasia (-/1/1), and southern Atlantic islands (-1-11). Replacement names were proposed for two neotropical genera and four subspecies. - In Part 2 (to be published in a later issue) a number of splits - namely those of known species into allospecies, which in most cases result in geographic representatives of a superspecies - are also addressed. But we restrict the treatment of these splits to the Palearctic and Indomalayan Realms. We suggest possible flaws in new descriptions and certain splits, regardless of the species concept addressed. However, in general this report should be taken as a documentation of new taxa, not as a critical review of recent changes in bird taxonomy and bird descriptions. © DO-G, IfV, MPG 2010.


Martens J.,Institute For Zoologie | Bahr N.,Zur Fahre 10
Vogelwarte | Year: 2012

This report is the sixth one of a series and presents the results of a comprehensive literature screening in search for new bird taxa described in 2010, namely new genera, species and subspecies worldwide. We tracked names of five genera, six species (one of them described twice by different authors from the same population within a couple of weeks) and 12 subspecies names new to science which according to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature were correctly described. New genera were erected for species or species groups, respectively, of the Caprimulgidae, Thamnophilidae, Furnariidae (one each) and Dendrocolaptidae (two). Four of the new species refer to Passeriformes and two to Non-Passeriformes, a buzzard and a parrotlet. The distributional areas of the new species often are minute, restricted to remote and difficult to access areas and were hitherto overlooked. Due to their limited ranges species new to science are often already endangered when detected. In several cases the populations in question now considered to present a new species were known since long. But only substantial studies of their songs, genetics and/or ecology their remarkable acoustical and genetic or ecological properties led to description of new species. In a Zoogeographie context most of the new taxa originate from the Neotropics, followed by South Pacific Islands including New Zealand, Afrotropics including Madagascar, Australasia and Palaearctic regions (two each). In a taxon sequence by genus/species/subspecies the newly described taxa have following origin: Neotropics (4/4/7), South Pacific (-/-/2), Afrotropics (1/1/-), Australasia (-/-/2), Palaearctic (-/1/1). A new name was proposed for a neotropical buzzard subspecies. A number of splits - namely those of known species into allospecies as the geographic representatives of a superspecies - are also addressed. But we restrict the treatment of these splits to the Palaearctic and Indo-Malayan regions. We suggest possible flaws in new descriptions and certain splits, regardless of the species concept addressed. However, in general this report should be taken as a documentation of new taxa, not as a critical review of recent changes in bird taxonomy and bird descriptions. © DO-G, IfV, MPG 2012.

Loading Zur Fahre 10 collaborators
Loading Zur Fahre 10 collaborators