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DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Innovations in Self-driven Vehicle s, Vehicle Monitoring and Safety Systems" report to their offering. This issue of Automotive and Transportation TOE covers recent developments in self-driven vehicles, vehicle monitoring and safety system. Innovations profiled include a LiDAR sensor by Luminar Technologies that can detect distant obstacles, application of artificial intelligence to make autonomous cars safer by AImotive Kft., a mobile app to track vehicle performance by Zubie, an advanced road safety system for hilly areas by Leo Burnett, a self-powered deceleration indicating lamp by Mechoptix Inc., a secure vehicle-to-everything solution for autonomous driving by Auto-Talks Ltd., a scalable digital cockpit platform for automobiles by HARMAN International, and an IoT platform suitable for connected cars by Nokia Oyj. The Advanced Manufacturing and Automation (AMA) Cluster covers technologies that enable clean, lean and flexible manufacturing and industrial automation. Technologies such as three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) printing, wireless sensors and networks, information and communication technology, multimaterial joining, composites manufacturing, digital manufacturing, micro- and nano-manufacturing, lasers, advanced software, and printing techniques, are covered as part of this cluster. The technologies covered here impact a wide range of industries, such as the impact semiconductor, automotive and transportation, aerospace and defense, industrial, healthcare, logistics, and electronics industries. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/rsfpnd/innovations_in


News Article | September 4, 2014
Site: gigaom.com

Zubie, the maker of a device that plugs into your car and can help you track how well (or poorly) you are driving, has signed a partnership with insurance provider Progressive. The agreement will let Zubie customers see how Progressive would charge them based on the driving data that Zubie collects. It’s the first agreement of its kind for both companies, but it has been something both firms have been working toward for a while. For Progressive, which has been a pioneer in usage-based pricing, it wants to start getting out of the business of sending customers hardware in order to track their driving habits. Currently under a program called Snapshot, Progressive customers opt in to a device that plugs into their cars’ on-board diagnostics(OBD) ports and shares their driving data with the insurer. They use the device for six months and then send it back. In return, Progressive charges them based on how well they drive, presumably giving them a lower rate on their insurance. (I can’t see someone who gets a bad rate sticking with Progressive.) But dealing with connected devices isn’t Progressive’s business and it’s CEO Glenn Renwick has said he is waiting eagerly for car manufacturers to offer the same data or another option to get that data so he doesn’t have to ship anymore black boxes. Zubie offers this chance. Dave Pratt, GM of Usage Based Insurance at Progressive, called this agreement the “first tangible step” toward that goal. He also explained that while Zubie is the first partner of this type, there could be other partnerships. Progressive is interested in not only car data, but also weather data and GPS data that could help pinpoint the likelihood of accidents or how a person drives. Pratt did say he wasn’t terribly interested in sensor data about people, though. So far, your insurance company doesn’t want to know if you slept well last night. As for Zubie, this is one of the first options available under a new perks program it is building for its members. They will soon not only see the option to send their data to Progressive in hopes of paying less for insurance, but also see coupons and more when their check engine light comes on or their brakes need attention. Zubie collects a monthly fee for its device to help offset the cost of providing a cellular data connection. Zubie’s CTO Ari Silkey says it’s that cellular connection that differentiates Zubie from other connected car devices such as the rival OBD port device from Automatic. He explained that Progressive wanted the reliability provided by cellular to ensure that each trip’s data was recorded even if the person didn’t have their phone nearby or a Wi-Fi hotspot. The existing Progressive boxes also use a cellular connection. Zubie was formed in 2012 as a partnership between Best Buy and OpenAir Equity Partners, a venture capital firm in Kansas City that focuses on the internet of things. It recently raised $8 million from Nokia and auto parts manufacturer Magna International.


News Article | September 24, 2013
Site: venturebeat.com

[Full disclosure: Zubie chief executive Tim Kelly is also the father of VentureBeat reporter Meghan Kelly.] The race is on to make our cars smarter. Car makers are exploring connected systems, and a bevy of startups aim to take advantage of the rise of smartphones and ubiquitous cellular access. Enter Zubie, a company that has a gadget to track your car’s diagnostics and trip data, which relays all of that information to your smartphone. The gadget, the $100 Zubie Key, takes advantage of the onboard diagnostics (OBD) port, which is in all cars built after 1996. Zubie’s big innovation is in its connectivity: Rather than relying on Bluetooth to talk to your smartphone when it’s in range, the Zubie Key sports a cellular connection, which opens up the ways you can use it. Families, for example, could purchase several Zubie Keys to keep track of all of their vehicles. It can provide some peace of mind for parents, since the Zubie Key can detect a vehicle’s current location, trip history, and potentially troublesome events (like instances of hard breaking, rapid acceleration, or the first time your child drives at night). “Our mission is simple: We want to make driving safer, easier, and less expensive,” said Tim Kelly, Zubie’s chief executive, in an interview with VentureBeat. The company was originally incubated by Best Buy, and Kelly came on to lead early this year after his stint as Network Solutions’ CEO (which included a $405 million acquisition by Web.com). Kelly also led Sprint’s mobile division, which puts him in a decent position to understand the complexities in releasing a cellular-connected gadget. In addition to trip-tracking, Zubie can also send alerts when your car needs repairs. (No more guessing why your check engine light has turned on.) The company claims that its service will also get smarter the more you use it, similar to Nest’s learning thermostat or Google Now. Zubie also provides a driving score for each driver based on 30 metrics, like acceleration, speeding, hard breaking, and more. It’s a quick way to get a sense of your own driving habits. Zubie officially launched nationwide yesterday after announcing last week that it raised $8 million in first-round funding form OpenAir Equity Partners. Buyers of the $100 Zubie key get one year of Zubie’s T-Mobile-powered wireless service, but you’ll need to pay $100 a year for additional service. Other connected car services like OnStar typically cost around $30 a month, so Kelly believes Zubie is offering a much better deal. We’ve seen many devices try to take advantage of your car’s OBD port over the years, but they typically involved periodically yanking out the gadget and connecting it to your computer. NYC startup Dash recently made a splash with its OBD gadget and attractive app, but it relies on Bluetooth to talk to your phone. Zubie’s cellular connectivity makes it the most seamless way to access your car’s diagnostic information, without much effort on your part. Navin Ganeshan, Zubie’s vice president of product management, showed me his family’s Zubie-connected fleet, which consists of cars all over the country. He was able to see specific trips his kids in California took, and he also had an alert for something that needed he needed to fix in his own car. Zubie’s iPhone app is admittedly rough-looking at this point, but the amount of data the company is able to gather impressed me. Zubie says an Android app is on the way. Looking ahead, Zubie is planning to offer extensive repair intelligence, so you can get a sense of how much a repair will cost in your area, offers and discounts if you choose to make some of your data available to companies, and theft and tow monitoring.


News Article | December 12, 2013
Site: venturebeat.com

[Full disclosure: Zubie CEO Tim Kelly is also the father of VentureBeat reporter Meghan Kelly.] We’ve seen plenty of gadgets try to make our cars smarter, but investors have apparently taken a liking to newcomer Zubie. The Charleston, South Carolina-based company, which makes a $100 gadget that plugs into your car and sends updates to apps on your phone over cellular networks, announced today that it has raised $10 million in a first round of funding from Castrol InnoVentures, Comporium, and OpenAir Equity Partners. When Zubie launched back in September, the company had just recently announced an $8 million first round of funding — today’s announcement just adds $2 million on top of that. While somewhat unusual, the new funding is a sign that investors are confident in Zubie’s technology. Zubie’s big innovation is in its connectivity. While most connected car gadgets simply talk to your phone over Bluetooth when it’s nearby, Zubie’s Key gadget has a cellular connection that’s always on, allowing you to do things like track your family’s vehicles anywhere in the U.S. The Zubie Key also tracks your car’s vitals and your driving habits, which can help you avoid surprise breakdowns. “Our mission is simple: We want to make driving safer, easier, and less expensive,” said Tim Kelly, Zubie’s chief executive, in an interview with VentureBeat back in September. Buyers of the $100 Zubie key get one year of Zubie’s T-Mobile-powered wireless service, but you’ll need to pay $100 a year for additional service. Other connected car services like OnStar typically cost around $30 a month, so Kelly believes Zubie is offering a much better deal.


News Article | August 11, 2014
Site: www.eweek.com

Zubie, a start-up that shares connected-car analytics via a mobile app, is the first business to be backed by NGP’s $100 million car fund. Nokia has invested $8 million in Zubie, a connected car start-up with a service that claims to connect “cars and drivers like never before.” The investment is the first to come out a $100 million Connected Car fund that Nokia announced in May and entrusted to Nokia Growth Partners (NGP), its investment arm. NGP has said it will identify and invest in innovations that are “important” to the world of intelligent vehicles. Funding isn’t all Zubie gained from NGP. Paul Asel, an NGP partner, has joined Zubie’s board of directors. Asel, in an Aug. 11 statement, said NGP was delighted to inaugurate the fund with its backing of Zubie, which, he added, “offers the potential to help transform our driving experience as it integrates more deeply with carmakers over time.”Zubie’s $100-a-year service features a Zubie Key that plugs in under the dashboard and connects the car to the Zubie Cloud (it works with most vehicles made after 1996). Even while parked, the Key’s sensors communicate information about the health of the car, the driver’s driving and other “interesting insights” to the cloud. Via a third component, the Zubie App, users can receive tips and information, whether they’re in the car or not.Friends can use the Zubie app to compare driving skills—their top speed, how hard they braked, whether they accelerated too rapidly—to others’. (“A little competition never hurts,” says the Zubie site.) Zubie also purports to save drivers money by alerting them to issues before they turn into costly repairs, and by pointing out more fuel-efficient routes. Parents can use it to keep track of teens and view their driving habits, and businesses can use it to track the vehicles in a fleet and improve driver safety. Intended for fleets with up to 20 vehicles, the application shows each vehicle’s route and diagnostic information, and geo-fencing alerts can be set up, to sound when a vehicle is somewhere it shouldn’t be. Magna, a global automotive supplier, also invested in Zubie, saying it’s interested in “novel solutions” in the automotive market. Included in the insights and analysis offered by the service (its four prints are real-time GPS tracking, vehicle health, driver performance and analysis) are benchmarks showing how a business’ driving stats compare to other fleets. “The era of the connected vehicle is expected to change the automotive landscape and create new value-creation opportunities for auto suppliers, inventors, startup companies and owners of intellectual property,” said Swamy Kotagiri, Magna CTO, in a statement. By 2024, research firm Analysis Mason expects that 48 percent of passenger vehicles in the world will have embedded connectivity and that revenue from connected passenger cards will increase from $1.4 billion in 2013 to 31 billion in 2024.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/9zcz8t/global_connected) has announced the addition of the "Global Connected Cars Market, By Technology, By Connectivity (Embedded, Integrated, Tethered), By Applications (Location Based, Infotainment & HMI, Safety & Security, Convenience, Driver Assistance), By Regions - Trends & Forecast: 2015 - 2020" report to their offering. "Global Connected Cars Market, By Technology (2G, 3G, 4G, GNSS), By Connectivity (Embedded, Integrated, Tethered), By Applications (Location Based, Infotainment & HMI, Safety & Security, Convenience, Driver Assistance), By Regions - Trends & Forecast: 2015 - 2020" The report provides unique insights into an in-depth analysis of global connected cars market, drivers and restraints as well as growth opportunities. It also contains analysis and forecast revenues, competitive landscape, company profiles and industry trends. Connected cars will enhance safety, traffic controllability, and overall car experience. The Global Connected Car market is expected to grow in the future mainly driven by adoption of technologies by customers and government initiatives in various regions. Automotive companies, tier1 suppliers, network carriers, modules plug-in, technology enablers, telematics provider and other will continue forge partnerships and create better connected car solutions. The global connected car market is expected to reach 153.6 billion by 2020.


News Article | March 6, 2015
Site: www.wired.com

We’re entering the age of the connected car, wherein automakers pump resources into infotainment systems and technologies that let consumers use their phones (and laptops, for anyone still using those things) to communicate with their vehicle. Just about every major automaker has developed a proprietary app that lets owners do things like track their car’s location, review fuel consumption, and see how fast their kids are driving. That means that everyone who bought a car before these systems became common (or was too cheap to spring for one) is a potential customer for an aftermarket system, and offerings have multiplied of late. Among them is Delphi’s Connect, which plugs into any car’s OBD-II port to provide location tracking, service alerts, and the ability to use one’s smartphone as a key fob and turn the car into a 4G LTE WiFi hotspot. And it’s looking to Microsoft for a little help making it work. Delphi is one of the industry’s largest suppliers and has been working with automakers almost as long as there have been automakers. That’s given it a solid history of innovation. It built the first electric starter in 1911, the first in-dash car radio in 1936, and the first integrated radio-navigation system in 1994. It developed the tech that made OnStar work in GM cars. Clearly these guys know in-car tech. Despite having plenty of competitors—including Verizon, Automatic, Metromile, and Zubie Key—Delphi believes Connect will be in 100,000 cars by the end of the year. It hopes to see the system in a million cars throughout the US and China within a few years. That means handling countless terabytes of data, something the company has precious little experience with. So it’s working alongside someone who does: Microsoft. Delphi is using Microsoft’s Azure cloud computing service to keep Connect running. It means Delphi can scale up without investing in its own computing infrastructure, or having to develop the know-how. While Google and Apple battle to visibly takeover the car’s dashboard, Microsoft prefers this supporting role, says Sanjay Ravi the tech giant’s senior director for worldwide manufacturing. It’s made similar deals with other automakers, including Toyota. At $99 ($199 if you want 4G connectivity), Connect should bring in plenty of cash for Delphi, but the system is also part of a larger move into automotive software. “As we look into the future and all of the technologies that will be highly valued by OEMs and consumers, they have more and more of their value derived from software,” not hardware like radios and batteries, says Victor Canseco, Delphi’s managing director of software and services. Part of the goal is to demonstrate Delphi’s capabilities in this space, especially as it develops its autonomous driving capabilities. That system works like an off-the-shelf catalog for automakers, which can pick and choose elements they want to use for their own cars. Making Connect a success—going from producing wiring to creating algorithms that keep a car safe in traffic—can show OEMs that Delphi can produce software as well as it does hardware. One step on the path toward making any car a self-driving car, it turns out, is making any car a connected car.


Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/9fnflr/global_connected) has announced the addition of the "Global Connected Cars Market, By Technology, By Connectivity (Embedded, Integrated, Tethered), By Applications (Location Based, Infotainment & HMI, Safety & Security, Convenience, Driver Assistance), By Regions - Trends & Forecast: 2015 - 2020" report to their offering. "Global Connected Cars Market, By Technology (2G, 3G, 4G, GNSS), By Connectivity (Embedded, Integrated, Tethered), By Applications (Location Based, Infotainment & HMI, Safety & Security, Convenience, Driver Assistance), By Regions - Trends & Forecast: 2015 - 2020" The report provides unique insights into an in-depth analysis of global connected cars market, drivers and restraints as well as growth opportunities. It also contains analysis and forecast revenues, competitive landscape, company profiles and industry trends. Connected cars will enhance safety, traffic controllability, and overall car experience. The Global Connected Car market is expected to grow in the future mainly driven by adoption of technologies by customers and government initiatives in various regions. Automotive companies, tier1 suppliers, network carriers, modules plug-in, technology enablers, telematics provider and other will continue forge partnerships and create better connected car solutions. The global connected car market is expected to reach 153.6 billion by 2020. Key Topics Covered: 1 Industry Overview 2 Report Outline 3 Market Snapshot 4 Market Characteristics 5 Trends and Roadmap 6 Technology: Market Size & Analysis 7 Connectivity: Market Size & Analysis 8 Applications: Market Size & Analysis 9 Regions: Market Size & Analysis 10 Competitive Landscape 11 Vendor Profiles 12 Global Generalists 13 Companies to Watch For Companies Mentioned


News Article | September 23, 2014
Site: gigaom.com

Mojio hopes to connect your unconnected car with some help from AT&T and Telus. The Vancouver-based startup on Tuesday announced its module, which plugs into the on-board diagnostics port of a car, will go on sale by the end of the year in the U.S. and Canada, using its two partners’ 3G networks to bring vehicle and app data to the cloud and your smartphone. If you’ve been following Mojio, then you’re probably noting its plans have changed since I posted my last update on it in April. Mojio launched its beta over T-Mobile’s network and planned to continue using T-Mo mobile data services when it launched its first commercial device this summer, but according to Mojio that deal is now dead and AT&T will be Mojio’s U.S. carrier partner. That probably also explains the delay in shipping as Mojio’s modules have to be reconfigured for AT&T and Telus’s networks. Mojio aggregates loads of data from a car’s internal network and computer to generate reports on your driving and the car’s general health. But it’s using vehicle data and its cellular connection to link to other apps as well. For instance, Glympse will use the Mojio module to keep constant tabs on the location of your car, no matter who is driving it. Mojio is one of many startups making plug-in car modules, but it’s trying to distinguish itself by building its own open development and app distribution platform. So instead of buying an Automatic Link or a Zubie and only getting access to their stable of features, Mojio is trying to get third party developers to optimize everything from parking spot-reservation apps to location-sharing services for its hardware. The other module makers are innovating plenty. Automatic just announced major integration projects with Ford and IFTTT, while MetroMile has developed a service that warns you when your car is parked in scheduled street sweeping zone. Mojio, however, is embracing an app store model that aims to bring a big range of apps to its device from the get go. The connectivity necessary to power those apps won’t be free though. Mojio announced its pricing today as well: in the U.S. the module will cost $149 ($169 in Canada) with free service for a year. After that the service will cost $5 a month. And there’s the rub. We’re increasingly seeing this kind of business model for internet-of-things gadgets, in which cellular connectivity carries a $5 to $10 monthly service fee. While those prices may not seem high individually, costs start mounting if you start connecting your camera, your kid’s watch and your dog’s collar to the wide-area network. In Mojio’s case it may very well bring enough apps and build enough functionality into its platform to justify such a monthly service fee, but many of the connected gadgets we see emerging today are designed to do one thing well, hardly justifying the costs of connecting them. At Gigaom’s Structure:Connect conference we’ll discuss these emerging internet of things business models in more detail.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/9zcz8t/global_connected) has announced the addition of the "Global Connected Cars Market, By Technology, By Connectivity (Embedded, Integrated, Tethered), By Applications (Location Based, Infotainment & HMI, Safety & Security, Convenience, Driver Assistance), By Regions - Trends & Forecast: 2015 - 2020" report to their offering. "Global Connected Cars Market, By Technology (2G, 3G, 4G, GNSS), By Connectivity (Embedded, Integrated, Tethered), By Applications (Location Based, Infotainment & HMI, Safety & Security, Convenience, Driver Assistance), By Regions - Trends & Forecast: 2015 - 2020" The report provides unique insights into an in-depth analysis of global connected cars market, drivers and restraints as well as growth opportunities. It also contains analysis and forecast revenues, competitive landscape, company profiles and industry trends. Connected cars will enhance safety, traffic controllability, and overall car experience. The Global Connected Car market is expected to grow in the future mainly driven by adoption of technologies by customers and government initiatives in various regions. Automotive companies, tier1 suppliers, network carriers, modules plug-in, technology enablers, telematics provider and other will continue forge partnerships and create better connected car solutions. The global connected car market is expected to reach 153.6 billion by 2020.

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