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São Paulo, Brazil

de Andrade A.R.O.,Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul | Dorva M.E.M.C.,Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul | de Andrade S.M.O.,Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul | Marques A.,Zoonosis Control Center | And 2 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease | Year: 2012

Objective: To identify the urban phlebotomine sandfly fauna in Ponta Porã, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Methods: The captures were undertaken from April 2009 to March 2010 with CDC light traps in 14 ecotopes (intra and peridomicile) in different areas of the city, Shannon traps being used in areas with abundant vegetation. Results: A total of 707 specimens were captured with CDC light traps (565 males and 142 females) and 155 specimens (112 males and 43 females) with Shannon traps, a total of 862 phlebotomines. The specimens captured belonged to eight species: Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz & Neiva, 1912), Evandromyia cortelezzii (Brethes, 1923), Sciopemyia sordelli (Shannon & Del Ponte, 1927), Pintomyia pessoai (Coutinho & Barretto, 1940); Pintomyia monticola (Costa Lima, 1932); Brumptomyia brumpti (Larousse, 1920); Nyssomyia whitmani (Antunes & Coutinho, 1939) and Psathyromyia shannoni (Dyar, 1929). Lutzomyia longipalpis, the main vector of Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi, was the species most frequently captured (97.03%) and also the most abundant according to the standardized abundance index (SAI)=0.86. Conclusions: The highest species richness was captured, with CDC light traps, inside the domiciles and the species diversity and evenness in the peridomicile, clearly indicating a preference for anthropic environments. © 2012 Asian Pacific Tropical Medicine Press.


Ceretti-Junior W.,University of Sao Paulo | Medeiros-Sousa A.R.,University of Sao Paulo | Multini L.C.,University of Sao Paulo | Urbinatti P.R.,University of Sao Paulo | And 6 more authors.
Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association | Year: 2014

We conducted an inventory of the mosquito fauna of the internodes of bamboo plants grown in municipal parks in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. During October 2010 to July 2013, a total of 8,541 immature stages belonging to 21 mosquito species were collected from bamboos over 61 municipal parks. Of these, Aedes albopictus was the most abundant species followed by Ae. aegypti found in broken bamboos in most parks. The former species was 7.2 times more abundant than the latter when both species shared the same habitat. Other species collected from bamboos included Culex quinquefasciatus and Haemagogus leucocelaenus. In bamboos with perforated internodes, species of the genus Wyeomyia were the most prevalent. Differences were also observed in species composition and abundance of mosquitoes collected in transversely broken bamboos and those collected from perforated bamboo internodes. Constant surveillance of these breeding sites is crucial due to the epidemiological importance of the species found. Furthermore, these breeding sites may help maintain some native wild mosquito populations along with a variety of other invertebrates found in these urban green areas. © 2014 by The American Mosquito Control Association, Inc.


De Andrade A.R.O.,Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul | Dorval M.E.M.C.,Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul | de Andrade S.M.O.,Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul | Marques A.,Zoonosis Control Center | And 3 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease | Year: 2011

Objective: Visceral leishmaniasis has been reported in all Brazilian regions and, in Mato Grosso do Sul State, the occurrence of cases has increased significantly. The objective of this study was to identify the natural infection of phlebotomines by Leishmania in Ponta Porã, a Brazilian county bordering Paraguay. Methods: By using light CDC and Shannon traps, 185 sandfly females were captured, dissected and arranged in 107 pools subjected to DNA extraction and amplification by Polymerase chain reaction. Results: From the samples subjected to amplification, the fragment of 120 bp characteristic of Leishmania sp was observed in one of the groups, which is composed by a female species of Evandromyia cortelezzii (Brèthes, 1923). Conclusions: The minimum infection rate calculated for Ponta Porã was 0.54%, and the occurrence of flagellates and the confirmation of natural infection by Leishmania chagasi pose a serious concern for the transmission of visceral leishmaniasis in the region. © 2011 Asian Pacific Tropical Medicine Press.


Bessa T.A.F.,Zoonosis Control Center | Spichler A.,Institute of Infectology Emilio Ribas | Berardis Chapola E.G.,Zoonosis Control Center | Husch A.C.,Zoonosis Control Center | And 5 more authors.
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Year: 2010

The biodiversity of potential leptospiral reservoir hosts is lower in urban than in rural environments. Previous data indicate the potential for bats to act as carriers of Leptospira in regions such as the Amazon of South America and in Australia. Yet, little is known about the contribution of bats to leptospirosis in urban environments in South America.This study aimed to test the hypothesis that bats infected with Leptospira are sources of leptospirosis transmission to humans in São Paulo City, Brazil. Six of 343 bats caught in different districts within the city of Sao Paulo (182 insectivorous, 161 frugivorous or nectarivorous) were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for pathogenic Leptospira; no seropositive bats were found.That few renal carriers of Leptospira were found in the city of Sao Paulo suggests that bats are not important in the transmission of leptospirosis to humans in this, and possibly other urban settings. Copyright © 2010 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.


Medeiros-Sousa A.R.,University of Sao Paulo | Ceretti Jr. W.,University of Sao Paulo | Urbinatti P.R.,University of Sao Paulo | De Carvalho G.C.,University of Sao Paulo | And 7 more authors.
Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association | Year: 2013

A mosquito faunal survey was conducted from October 2010 to February 2011 in the municipal parks of São Paulo City, Brazil. A total of 7,015 specimens of 53 taxonomic categories grouped into 12 genera (Aedes, Anopheles, Coquilletidia, Culex, Limatus, Lutzia, Mansonia, Psorophora, Toxorhynchites, Trichoprosopon, Uranotaenia, and Wyeomyia) were collected. The largest and most peripheral parks showed greater species richness compared to smaller and more centralized parks. © 2013 by The American Mosquito Control Association, Inc.

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