Zoological Society of London ZSL

Regents Park, United Kingdom

Zoological Society of London ZSL

Regents Park, United Kingdom

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Roe D.,International Institute for Environment and Development IIED | Day M.,International Institute for Environment and Development IIED | Day M.,Center for International Forestry Research | Booker F.,International Institute for Environment and Development IIED | And 14 more authors.
Environmental Evidence | Year: 2014

Background: Alternative livelihood projects are used by a variety of organisations as a tool for achieving conservation results. Yet these interventions, including their objectives, vary a great deal, and there is no single accepted definition of what constitutes an alternative livelihood project. In addition, very little is known about what impacts, if any, alternative livelihoods projects have had on biodiversity conservation, as well as what determines the success or failure of these interventions. Reflecting this concern, a resolution was passed at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in 2012 calling for a critical review of the benefits to biodiversity of alternative livelihood projects. This systematic review is intended to contribute to this resolution. Methods/Design: This protocol details the methodology for exploring the research question: Are alternative livelihood projects effective at reducing local threats to specified elements of biodiversity and/or improving or maintaining the conservation status of those elements? The aim of this proposed systematic review is to provide an overview for researchers, policy makers and practitioners of the current state of the evidence base. To undertake this, the systematic review will explore peer-reviewed research from the bibliographic databases SCOPUS, Web of Science, CAB Abstracts, AGRIS and AGRICOLA using search terms and Boolean search operators. The systematic review will also explore grey literature sources by conducting searches on Google, subject specific websites and institutional websites. Additionally, the review will use calls for papers and snowballing techniques to further identify literature. In order to identify relevant evidence, inclusion criteria will be used to screen the titles and abstracts of the captured literature. Data will be extracted from the final list of relevant documents by using a questionnaire established through literature review and a stakeholder workshop. The key output of this review will be a report on the state of the evidence, and, if the data permits, an estimate of the effectiveness of alternative livelihood interventions. © 2014 Roe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Roe D.,International Institute for Environment and Development IIED | Booker F.,International Institute for Environment and Development IIED | Booker F.,Center for International Forestry Research | Day M.,International Institute for Environment and Development IIED | And 14 more authors.
Environmental Evidence | Year: 2015

Background: Alternative livelihood projects are used by a variety of organisations as a tool for achieving biodiversity conservation. However, despite characterising many conservation approaches, very little is known about what impacts (if any) alternative livelihood projects have had on biodiversity conservation, as well as what determines the relative success or failure of these interventions. Reflecting this concern, Motion 145 was passed at the Vth IUCN World Conservation Congress in 2012 calling for a critical review of alternative livelihood projects and their contribution to biodiversity conservation. This systematic map and review intends to contribute to this critical review and provide an overview for researchers, policy makers and practitioners of the current state of the evidence base. Methods: Following an a priori protocol, systematic searches for relevant studies were conducted using the bibliographic databases AGRICOLA, AGRIS, CAB Abstracts, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge, as well as internet searches of Google, Google Scholar, and subject specific and institutional websites. In addition, a call for literature was issued among relevant research networks. The titles, abstracts and full texts of the captured studies were assessed using inclusion criteria for the systematic map and the systematic review, respectively. An Excel spreadsheet was used to record data from each study and to provide a systematic map of the evidence for the effectiveness of alternative livelihood studies. The studies that met additional criteria to be included in the systematic review were described in more detail through a narrative synthesis. Results: Following full text screening, 97 studies were included in the systematic map covering 106 projects using alternative livelihood interventions. Just 22 of these projects met our additional criteria for inclusion in the systematic review, but one project was removed from the detailed narrative synthesis following critical appraisal. The 21 included projects included reports of positive, neutral and negative conservation outcomes. Conclusions: Our results show that there has been an extensive investment in alternative livelihood projects, yet the structure and results of most of these projects have not been documented in a way that they can be captured using standardised search processes. Either this is because there has been little reporting on the outcomes of these projects, or that post-project monitoring is largely absent. The implications of this review for policy, management and future research are provided in relation to this evidence gap. © 2015 Roe et al.


PubMed | University of Leeds and Zoological Society of London ZSL
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Xenopus longipes Loumont and Kobel, 1991 is an aquatic polyploid frog endemic to the high altitude crater lake, Lake Oku in North West region, Cameroon (Loumont & Kobel 1991). The tadpole of X. longipes is currently undescribed. So far, only dead tadpoles have been found at Lake Oku during regular monitoring since 2008 (Doherty-Bone et al. 2013), with specimens too decomposed to make adequate descriptions. Captive breeding provides one opportunity to obtain fresh specimens for description.


PubMed | Zoological Society of London ZSL
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians | Year: 2010

Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID), also known as Equine Cushings disease, is most often diagnosed in older horses and ponies. To the authors knowledge, there have been no reports of its diagnosis in captive nondomestic equids. A 13-yr old onager (Equus hemionus onager) at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) Whipsnade Zoo showed clinical signs suggestive of PPID, including hirsutism, fat redistribution, weight loss, laminitis, and chronic infections. A dexamethasone suppression test was performed to confirm PPID. Subsequently, adenomatous hyperplasia and microadenoma of the pars intermedia were identified postmortem. Four months later, this onagers dam died suddenly, and adenomatous hyperplasia of the pars intermedia was diagnosed following necropsy. The dam had shown no clinical signs of PPID. Examination of archives identified eight other adult onagers that died or were euthanized between 1993 and 2007. The brain was not examined in four of these, but pituitary glands were described as enlarged during necropsy in three animals based on the subjective assessment of an experienced zoo and wildlife pathologist, making an overall prevalence of enlargement of 83.3%. Hyperplastic pituitary changes are positively correlated with age in domestic equids, and this may also be the case in onagers. Alternative etiologies are also discussed.

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