Zoological Research Museum Koenig

Bonn, Germany

Zoological Research Museum Koenig

Bonn, Germany
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Wilbrandt J.,Zoological Research Museum Koenig | Lee P.,British Myriapod and Isopod Group | Read H.,British Myriapod and Isopod Group | Wesener T.,Zoological Research Museum Koenig
Biodiversity Data Journal | Year: 2015

Three populations of the pill millipede genus Trachysphaera Heller 1858 are present in Great Britain, one on the Isle of Wight, one in South Wales and one in mid-Wales. To identify and characterize the British Trachysphaera populations, the intraspecific and interspecific variation of the populations in South Wales and on the Isle of Wight were studied and evaluated in a first integrative study of members of Trachysphaera, utilizing barcoding and SEM. DNA was extracted from 28 British Trachysphaera and 10 French T. lobata (Ribaut 1954) specimens, one each of French T. cf. drescoi (Conde and Demange 1961) and T. pyrenaica (Ribaut 1908), and one of Spanish T. cf. rousseti (Demange 1959); the barcoding fragment of the COI gene was amplified and their genetic intra- and interpopulation distances compared with one another using two Italian T. spp. and one Croatian T. schmidti Heller 1858 specimens as near outgroups. To compare the genetic distances with the morphological characters, 15 characters of a total of 13 British Trachysphaera, together with two specimens of T. pyrenaica, two T. cf. drescoi and one of T. cf. rousseti were imaged, using the same individuals utilized for DNA extraction. Albeit both British populations are genetically distant, they are closely related (1.9-2.5% pdistance) to French T. lobata, corroborating results of earlier studies. Between different Trachysphaera species, genetic distance was high (16.7-18.8%). The morphological study showed the non-reliability of key taxonomic characters in Trachysphaera, with genetically identical individuals exhibiting morphological variation, especially on the telopods. The only observed morphological characters constant within and different between species were the number of rows of sclerotized bacilli on the tergites, as well as the shape of the male and female anal shield. Both, barcoding and the morphological study identify the British Trachysphaera populations as T. lobata. © Wilbrandt J et al.


Garcia F.H.,Zoological Research Museum Koenig | Fischer G.,Zoological Research Museum Koenig | Peters M.K.,Zoological Research Museum Koenig
Zootaxa | Year: 2010

The taxonomy of the Tetramorium weitzeckeri species group is revised for the Afrotropical zoogeographic region. The revision is based on morphology and morphometrics of the worker caste. Twenty six species are recognised of which twelve are described as new: Tetramorium bendai sp. n., Tetramorium boltoni sp. n., Tetramorium intermedium sp. n., Tetramorium kakamega sp. n., Tetramorium mkomazi sp. n., Tetramorium philippwagneri sp. n., Tetramorium renae. n., Tetramorium robertsoni sp. n., Tetramorium rubrum sp. n., Tetramorium susannae sp. n., Tetramorium tanaense sp. n., and Tetramorium trirugosum sp. n.. Tetramorium akengense (Wheeler, W.M. 1922) is revived from synonymy and Tetramorium tersum Santschi, Tetramorium (Xiphomyrmex) kivuense Stitz, and Xiphmyrmex kivuense st. atrinodis Santschi are proposed as junior synonyms of Tetramorium edouardi Forel. All other earlier synonymisations are confirmed here. The species group is redefined and subdivided into three species complexes which are defined and discussed: the Tetramorium edouardi complex (9 species), the Tetramorium muralti complex (8 species), and the Tetramorium weitzeckeri complex (9 species). An illustrated identification key to the Afrotropical species is presented, and for each species diagnosis, description, and taxonomic discussion are provided. Biogeography and important morphological characters of diagnostic value are discussed. © 2010 Magnolia Press.

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