Zoological Park Organization

Dusit District, Thailand

Zoological Park Organization

Dusit District, Thailand
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Songsasen N.,Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute | Henson L.H.,Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute | Tipkantha W.,Zoological Park Organization | Tipkantha W.,Chulalongkorn University | And 4 more authors.
Reproduction in Domestic Animals | Year: 2017

Mitochondria play fundamental roles during oocyte development. The accumulation and spatial redistribution of these energy-producing organelles have been linked to the developmental competence of mammalian oocytes. Here, we assessed the copy number, distribution and activity of mitochondria within cat oocytes during folliculogenesis. In Experiment 1, oocytes were recovered from primordial (n = 152), primary (112), secondary (95), early (131), small (118), antral (86) and advanced antral (5) stages follicles, and mitochondria DNA extracted and quantified using qPCR. In Experiment 2, oocytes from pre-antral (n = 44), early antral (n = 66), small antral (n = 59), antral (n = 41) and advanced antral (n = 21) follicles were isolated and stained with CMXRos MitoTracker dye to assess mitochondrial distribution pattern and activity levels. Oocyte's mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers gradually increased as folliculogenesis progressed, with a significant shift at the small antral stage (0.5 to <1 mm in diameter). The location of mitochondria gradually shifted from a homogeneous distribution throughout the cytoplasm in pre-antral oocytes to a pericortical concentration in the advanced antral stage. Quantification of CMXRos fluorescent intensity revealed a progressive increase in mitochondrial activity in oocytes from the pre-antral to the large antral follicles. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that cat oocytes undergo dynamic changes in mitochondrial copy number, distribution and activity during folliculogenesis. These significant modifications to this crucial cytoplasmic organelle are likely associated with the acquisition of developmental competency by cat oocytes. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH


Sariya L.,Mahidol University | Chatsirivech J.,Mahidol University | Suksai P.,Mahidol University | Wiriyarat W.,Mahidol University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Virological Methods | Year: 2012

Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus 1 (EEHV1) can cause fatal hemorrhagic disease in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Several studies have described this virus as a major threat to young Asian elephants. A SYBR Green I-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to identify EEHV1 on trunk swabs and necropsied tissues. Two of 29 (6.9%) trunk swab samples from healthy Asian elephants were positive for EEHV1. The viruses were analyzed and classified as EEHV1A based on 231 nucleotides of the terminase gene. Necropsied spleen and heart tissue showed the highest level and second highest levels of DNA virus copy accumulation, respectively. The detection limit of the test was 276. copies/μl of DNA. There was no cross-reaction with other mammalian herpesviruses, such as herpes simplex virus 1 and equine herpesvirus 2. Inter- and intra-assay showed low coefficients of variation values indicating the reproducibility of the test. The results indicated that the test can be practically used for epidemiological study, clinical diagnosis, and management and control of EEHV1. © 2012 Elsevier B.V..


Hara T.,Kyoto University | Hirai Y.,Kyoto University | Baicharoen S.,Zoological Park Organization | Hayakawa T.,Kyoto University | And 3 more authors.
Genes and Genetic Systems | Year: 2012

The superfamily Hominoidea (hominoids) comprises two families: Hominidae (hominids) and Hylobatidae (gibbons, also called small apes). The SVA transposon is a composite retrotransposon that occurs widely in hominoids and is considered to have been generated by stepwise fusions of three genetic elements: SINE-R, a variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) sequence, and Alu. We identified a novel transposon whose basic structure is the same as that of SVA, with one prominent difference being the presence of part of prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) in place of SINE-R. We designate this composite transposon as PVA and propose two possible mechanisms regarding its generation. One is the derivation of PVA from SVA: the SINE-R region of SVA was replaced with a PTGR2 fragment by template switching. The other is the formation of PVA independently of SVA: a PTGR2 fragment was fused to an evolutionary intermediate comprising the VNTR and Alu regions. The nucleotide sequence of the junction between the VNTR and PTGR2 regions supports the second hypothesis. We identified PVA in the white-cheeked gibbon Nomascus leucogenys by analysis of genome sequence databases, and subsequent experimental analysis revealed its presence in all four gibbon genera. The white-cheeked gibbon harbors at least 93 PVA copies in its haploid genome. Another SVA-like composite transposon carrying parts of the LINE1 and Alu transposons in place of SINE-R, designated as LAVA, has recently been reported. The significance of the discovery of PVA is that its substituted fragment originates not from a transposon but from a single-copy gene. PVA should provide additional insights into the transposition mechanism of this type of composite transposon; the transposition activity is conferred even if the substituted fragment is not related to a transposon.


Sommanustweechai A.,Zoological Park Organization | Vongpakorn M.,National Institute of Animal Health Kaset Klang | Kasantikul T.,Zoological Park Organization | Taewnean J.,Khao Kheow Open Zoo | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine | Year: 2010

Neosporosis was diagnosed in a 16- year-old female white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) that died suddenly without clinical signs. Histopathology revealed disseminated protozoan tachyzoites in liver, adrenal cortex, kidney, and intestine, with morphology compatible with either Toxoplasma or Neospora. The organism was identified as Neospora caninum with the use of primary rabbit antiN. caninum antibody immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction. The exact source of infection remains unknown, but it is suspected that N. caninum oocysts were ingested from the soil. Copyright 2010 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.


PubMed | Zoological Park Organization
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians | Year: 2010

Neosporosis was diagnosed in a 16-year-old female white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) that died suddenly without clinical signs. Histopathology revealed disseminated protozoan tachyzoites in liver, adrenal cortex, kidney, and intestine, with morphology compatible with either Toxoplasma or Neospora. The organism was identified as Neospora caninum with the use of primary rabbit anti-N. caninum antibody immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction. The exact source of infection remains unknown, but it is suspected that N. caninum oocysts were ingested from the soil.

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