Zoo Duisburg AG

Duisburg, Germany

Zoo Duisburg AG

Duisburg, Germany
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Wiegmann L.,University of Leipzig | Wiegmann L.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Silaghi C.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Silaghi C.,University of Zürich | And 7 more authors.
Veterinary Parasitology | Year: 2015

Two cases of acute babesiosis in captive reindeer (. Rangifer tarandus) in two German zoos in 2009 and 2012 triggered this study to investigate the occurrence and species diversity of Babesia parasites infecting reindeer in different zoos and deer parks in Germany. Between June and December 2013, blood samples were taken from 123 clinically inapparent reindeer from 16 different facilities. Samples were tested for the presence of Babesia species DNA by conventional PCR and sequence analysis of part of the 18S rRNA gene. Also, Giemsa-stained smears of reindeer blood samples were examined for parasitaemia by light microscopy.The overall PCR-prevalence in blood samples was 23.6% (. n=. 29). Comparison of sequenced amplicons with GenBank entries possibly revealed up to five different Babesia species: B. venatorum (. n=. 19), B. capreoli (. n=. 2) and B. capreoli-like (. n=. 4), B. odocoilei-like (. n=. 2) and B. divergens (. n=. 1), while one sample turned out to be a Theileria sp. Out of the 16 facilities in the study, 12 housed at least one positive animal. In Giemsa-stained blood smears, intra-erythrocytic Babesia parasites were detected in samples of three reindeer from three locations.The high prevalence of Babesia infections implicates babesiosis to be a relevant infectious disease threat for captive reindeer in Germany. Consequently, reindeer with clinical signs compatible to those of acute babesiosis should either be tested for the presence of Babesia spp. DNA or blood smears should be examined for parasitaemia. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Langer S.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Jurczynski K.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Gessler A.,Pathology Unit | Kaup F.-J.,University of Gottingen | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Comparative Pathology | Year: 2014

Conjoined twinning is rare in man and non-human primates. The current report describes a case of ischiopagus tripus conjoined Western Lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) twins. The female twins were joined at the umbilical and pelvic region, involving the liver, xiphoid, umbilicus, body wall and skin. Computed tomography revealed two complete spines. The combined pelvic space was formed by two sacra, each connected with two iliac bones. The twins were only conjoined by a common pubis. Cause of death was attributed to cardiac and circulatory collapse resulting from a large patent foramen ovale (8mm in diameter) of one twin and neonatal asphyxia. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Zoo Duisburg AG, Pathology Unit and University of Gottingen
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Journal of comparative pathology | Year: 2014

Conjoined twinning is rare in man and non-human primates. The current report describes a case of ischiopagus tripus conjoined Western Lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) twins. The female twins were joined at the umbilical and pelvic region, involving the liver, xiphoid, umbilicus, body wall and skin. Computed tomography revealed two complete spines. The combined pelvic space was formed by two sacra, each connected with two iliac bones. The twins were only conjoined by a common pubis. Cause of death was attributed to cardiac and circulatory collapse resulting from a large patent foramen ovale (8 mm in diameter) of one twin and neonatal asphyxia.


Hottges N.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | Ternes K.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Greven H.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
Der Zoologische Garten | Year: 2015

From videorecordings of a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during calving and subsequent rearing taken by commercial surveillance cameras, which cover a period of two months, we selected three days (I = day of birth, II = 7th day after birth; III = 14th day after birth) to qualitatively and especially quantitatively describe exemplarily the locomotion calculated as covered distance, respiratory rate, resting periods of the mother (Daisy) as well as respiratory rate and amount and duration of suckles of her calf (Darwin). For quantitative analysis we used the freeware-program tracker. The observed calving process followed the pattern well-known from literature.Comparing the collected data we show a considerable decrease of Daisy's distance swimming before birth, an increase after birth, followed again by a significant decrease until day III. Distances travelled by Daisy per day were exceptionally large (ca. 100. km). Before birth her respiratory rate was significantly lower than after birth, and then it was relatively constant over time. Periods of inactivity were frequent before birth, not observed after birth, and began to increase from day II. The respiratory rate of Darwin increased over time (day I to day III) exceeding that of Daisy (day II, III). Frequency and number of suckling bouts decreased over time. Some of the behavioral changes of Daisy shown during the observation period can be associated with Daisy's care of the calf and its increasing independence. Altogether our approach allowed quantifying behavioural elements of mother and calf very detailed even in recordings not necessarily suitable for such studies. The fine-scale analysis revealed reproducible and reliable data, which show in the present case again the considerable changes in the behaviour of mother and calf even within a period of only two weeks. © 2015.


Hottges N.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | Hottges N.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Ternes K.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Greven H.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
Der Zoologische Garten | Year: 2015

From videorecordings of a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during calving and subsequent rearing taken by commercial surveillance cameras, which cover a period of two months, we selected three days (I = day of birth, II = 7th day after birth; III = 14th day after birth) to qualitatively and especially quantitatively describe exemplarily the locomotion calculated as covered distance, respiratory rate, resting periods of the mother (Daisy) as well as respiratory rate and amount and duration of suckles of her calf (Darwin). For quantitative analysis we used the freeware-program tracker. The observed calving process followed the pattern well-known from literature.Comparing the collected data we show a considerable decrease of Daisy's distance swimming before birth, an increase after birth, followed again by a significant decrease until day III. Distances travelled by Daisy per day were exceptionally large (ca. 100 km). Before birth her respiratory rate was significantly lower than after birth, and then it was relatively constant over time. Periods of inactivity were frequent before birth, not observed after birth, and began to increase from day II. The respiratory rate of Darwin increased over time (day I to day III) exceeding that of Daisy (day II, III). Frequency and number of suckling bouts decreased over time. Some of the behavioral changes of Daisy shown during the observation period can be associated with Daisy's care of the calf and its increasing independence. Altogether our approach allowed quantifying behavioural elements of mother and calf very detailed even in recordings not necessarily suitable for such studies. The fine-scale analysis revealed reproducible and reliable data, which show in the present case again the considerable changes in the behaviour of mother and calf even within a period of only two weeks. © 2015 .


Langer S.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Ternes K.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Widmer D.,Zoo Duisburg AG | Mutschmann F.,Exomed
Zoo Biology | Year: 2014

To the authors knowledge this is the first case of intersexuality in an African dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis). An adult African dwarf crocodile with a male-typical phenotype lived at Zoo Duisburg in Germany for 10 years. It died in October 2012 despite intensive treatment as a result of terminal septicemia. After a detailed pathological examination the gonads were histologically confirmed as ovotestes. Half of the 22 extant species of crocodilians have been examined for occurrence of temperature dependent sex determination (TSD). In TSD reptiles, masculinizing temperatures yield 100% or a majority of males, whereas feminizing temperatures yield 100% or a majority of females. In the transition range of temperature (TRT), a mix of males, females and sometimes intersexes are obtained. However, the molecular mechanisms behind TSD and an explanation for the occurrence of intersexuality remain elusive. Zoo Biol. 33:459-462, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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