Portage, MI, United States
Portage, MI, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Steiniger S.C.J.,Zoetis VMRD Global Therapeutics Research | Dunkle W.E.,Zoetis VMRD Global Therapeutics Research | Bammert G.F.,Zoetis VMRD Global Therapeutics Research | Wilson T.L.,Zoetis VMRD Global Therapeutics Research | And 5 more authors.
Molecular Immunology | Year: 2014

Complementarity determining regions (CDR) are responsible for binding antigen and provide substantial diversity to the antibody repertoire, with VH CDR3 of the immunoglobulin variable heavy (VH) domain playing a dominant role. In this study, we examined 1200 unique canine VH and 500 unique variable light (VL) sequences of large and small canine breeds derived from peripheral B cells. Unlike the human and murine repertoire, the canine repertoire is heavily dominated by the Canis lupus familiaris IGHV1 subgroup, evolutionarily closest to the human IGHV3 subgroup. Our studies clearly show that the productive canine repertoire of all analyzed breeds shows similarities to both human and mouse; however, there are distinct differences in terms of VH CDR3 length and amino acid paratope composition. In comparison with the human and murine antibody repertoire, canine VH CDR3 regions are shorter in length than the human counterparts, but longer than the murine VH CDR3. Similar to corresponding human and mouse VH CDR3, the amino acids at the base of the VH CDR3 loop are strictly conserved. For identical CDR positions, there were significant changes in chemical paratope composition. Similar to human and mouse repertoires, the neutral amino acids tyrosine, glycine and serine dominate the canine VH CDR3 interval (comprising 35%) although the interval is nonetheless relatively depleted of tyrosine when compared to human and mouse. Furthermore, canine VH CDR3 displays an overrepresentation of the neutral amino acid threonine and the negatively charged aspartic acid while proline content is similar to that in the human repertoire. In general, the canine repertoire shows a bias towards small, negatively charged amino acids. Overall, this analysis suggests that functional canine therapeutic antibodies can be obtained from human and mouse sequences by methods of speciation and affinity maturation. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | University of Texas at Austin and Zoetis VMRD Global Therapeutics Research
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Molecular immunology | Year: 2014

Complementarity determining regions (CDR) are responsible for binding antigen and provide substantial diversity to the antibody repertoire, with VH CDR3 of the immunoglobulin variable heavy (VH) domain playing a dominant role. In this study, we examined 1200 unique canine VH and 500 unique variable light (VL) sequences of large and small canine breeds derived from peripheral B cells. Unlike the human and murine repertoire, the canine repertoire is heavily dominated by the Canis lupus familiaris IGHV1 subgroup, evolutionarily closest to the human IGHV3 subgroup. Our studies clearly show that the productive canine repertoire of all analyzed breeds shows similarities to both human and mouse; however, there are distinct differences in terms of VH CDR3 length and amino acid paratope composition. In comparison with the human and murine antibody repertoire, canine VH CDR3 regions are shorter in length than the human counterparts, but longer than the murine VH CDR3. Similar to corresponding human and mouse VH CDR3, the amino acids at the base of the VH CDR3 loop are strictly conserved. For identical CDR positions, there were significant changes in chemical paratope composition. Similar to human and mouse repertoires, the neutral amino acids tyrosine, glycine and serine dominate the canine VH CDR3 interval (comprising 35%) although the interval is nonetheless relatively depleted of tyrosine when compared to human and mouse. Furthermore, canine VH CDR3 displays an overrepresentation of the neutral amino acid threonine and the negatively charged aspartic acid while proline content is similar to that in the human repertoire. In general, the canine repertoire shows a bias towards small, negatively charged amino acids. Overall, this analysis suggests that functional canine therapeutic antibodies can be obtained from human and mouse sequences by methods of speciation and affinity maturation.


PubMed | University of Texas at Austin, Distributed Bio Inc and Zoetis VMRD Global Therapeutics Research
Type: | Journal: Biologicals : journal of the International Association of Biological Standardization | Year: 2017

Next-Generation Sequencing combined with bioinformatics is a powerful tool for analyzing the large number of DNA sequences present in the expressed antibody repertoire and these data sets can be used to advance a number of research areas including antibody discovery and engineering. The accurate measurement of the immune repertoire sequence composition, diversity and abundance is important for understanding the repertoire response in infections, vaccinations and cancer immunology and could also be useful for elucidating novel molecular targets. In this study 4 individual domestic cats (Felis catus) were subjected to antibody repertoire sequencing with total number of sequences generated 1079863 for VH for IgG, 1050824 VH for IgM, 569518 for VK and 450195 for VL. Our analysis suggests that a similar VDJ expression patterns exists across all cats. Similar to the canine repertoire, the feline repertoire is dominated by a single subgroup, namely VH3. The antibody paratope of felines showed similar amino acid variation when compared to human, mouse and canine counterparts. All animals show a similarly skewed VH CDR-H3 profile and, when compared to canine, human and mouse, distinct differences are observed. Our study represents the first attempt to characterize sequence diversity in the expressed feline antibody repertoire and this demonstrates the utility of using NGS to elucidate entire antibody repertoires from individual animals. These data provide significant insight into understanding the feline immune system function.

Loading Zoetis VMRD Global Therapeutics Research collaborators
Loading Zoetis VMRD Global Therapeutics Research collaborators