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Shan W.-G.,Zhejiang University of Technology | Gao Z.-L.,Zhejiang University of Technology | Ying Y.-M.,Zhejiang University of Technology | Ying Y.-M.,Drug Research Development Corporation | And 4 more authors.
Helvetica Chimica Acta | Year: 2014

Two new tirucallane-type triterpenoids, (24Z)-tirucalla-7,24-diene-3b,11b,26-triol (1) and (3S,24R)-tirucall-7-ene-3,24,25-triol (2), along with the known compound celastrol (3), were isolated from the root barks of Celastrus stylosus Wall. The structures of 1 - 3 were established by spectroscopic methods, including extensive 2D NMR and MS analyses. It is the first report on tirucallane-type triterpenoids from the genus Celastrus and may be of vital chemotaxonomic significance. © 2014 PLOS ONE. Source


Wang R.,Zhejiang CONBA Pharmaceutical and Drug Research Development Corporation | Wang R.,Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Traditional Chinese Medicine | Kobayashi Y.,The University of Shimane | Lin Y.,Medical Corporation Soujikai | And 9 more authors.
Planta Medica | Year: 2015

An HPLC quantification method for ginkgolic acid derivatives in Ginkgo biloba leaf extracts was developed. Using 13:0 ginkgolic acid as a marker compound, the relative correlation factors of the four other ginkgolic acid derivatives - namely, 15:0 ginkgolic acid, 15:1 ginkgolic acid, 17:1 ginkgolic acid, and 17:2 ginkgolic acid - to 13:0 ginkgolic acid were determined by HPLC and subsequently used for calculating their contents in ten hydro-ethanolic refined extract samples. In other words, the content of 13:0 ginkgolic acid in the extracts was determined using the isolated compound as an external standard. Subsequently the now known concentration of this compound functioned as an internal standard for the quantification of the other four ginkgolic acid derivatives via the described correlation factors. This HPLC method was validated by two independent control measurements, one with an external standard for every individual compound and one based on the present method with the single marker compound alone. The results did not differ significantly in any of the 10 tested extract samples. The protocol presented here thus not only uses the same reference substance for G. biloba extracts as the current Chinese Pharmacopoeia method but also incorporates the advantages of the current European Pharmacopoeia approach. It is simple, reproducible, and can be used to determine the total contents of ginkgolic acid derivatives in G. biloba leaf extracts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG. Source


Wang R.,Zhejiang CONBA Pharmaceutical and Drug Research Development Corporation | Wang R.,Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Traditional Chinese Medicine | Kobayashi Y.,The University of Shimane | Lin Y.,Medical Corporation Soujikai | And 7 more authors.
Phytomedicine | Year: 2015

In Qinghai Province, the Brassica campestris L. pollen preparation Qianlie Kang Pule'an Tablet (QKPT) is traditionally used for BPH therapy. However, in QKPT the content of supposedly active phytosterols is relatively low at 2.59%, necessitating high doses for successful therapy. Therefore, a phytosterol enriched (4.54%) refined extract of B. campestris pollen (PE) was developed and compared with QKPT in a BPH rat model. Six groups of rats (n = 8 each), namely sham-operated distilled water control, castrated distilled water control, castrated QKPT 2.0 g/kg, castrated PE 0.1 g/kg, castrated PE 0.2 g/kg, and castrated PE 0.4 g/kg, were intragastrically treated with the respective daily doses. Testosterone propionate (0.3 mg/day) was administered to all castrated rats, while the sham-operated group received placebo injections. After 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and prostates as well as seminal vesicles excised and weighted in order to calculate prostate volume index (PVI) as well as prostate index (PI) and seminal vesicle index (SVI), defined as organ weight in g per 100 g body weight. Compared with sham-operated controls, PI (p < 0.01), PVI (p < 0.01), and SVI (p < 0.01) were all significantly increased in all castrated, testosterone treated rats. After treatment with PE at 0.4 and 0.2 g/kg or QKPT at 2.0 g/kg per day, both indices were significantly reduced (p < 0.01) as compared to the castrated distilled water control. For PE at 0.1 g/kg per day only PI was significantly reduced (p < 0.05). At the highest PE concentration of 0.4 g/kg per day both PI and SVI were also significantly reduced when compared to the QKPT group (p < 0.05). Both PE and QKPT demonstrated curative effects against BPH in the applied animal model. In its highest dose at 0.4 g/kg per day, PE was clearly superior to QKPT. © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. Source

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