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Hangzhou Zhejiang Province, China

Geely is a Chinese automotive manufacturing company headquartered in Binjiang District, Hangzhou, China. Its principal products are automobiles, motorcycles, engines, and transmissions. It sells passenger cars under two brand names: Geely and Volvo.Geely Automobile Holdings Ltd , a subsidiary of Geely, is listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Wikipedia.


Patent
Zhejiang Geely Holding Group | Date: 2015-02-19

A power system of a series hybrid vehicle, comprising a fuel source; a control system; at least two auxiliary power units, each of which auxiliary power units, under control of the control system, independently receives fuel from the fuel source, and converts chemical energy in the fuel into electrical energy and outputs the electrical energy to a common current bus; a power battery electrically connected to a common current bus to, under control of the control system, receive electrical energy from the common current bus to perform charging or perform discharging through the common current bus; and a traction motor electrically connected to the common current bus to, under control of the control system, receive electrical energy from the common current bus and convert the electrical energy into mechanical energy and transmit the mechanical energy to a power train of the vehicle so as to drive the vehicle to run.


Patent
Zhejiang Geely Holding Group and Shanghai Maple Guorun Automobile Co. | Date: 2012-02-13

A hydraulic control device for a hybrid transmission is designed such that the cooling and lubrication oil line of the system are in oil communication even before the main oil line pressure reaches the set pressure of the overflow valve, so as to lubricate the transmission as soon as possible. The hybrid transmission design further provides an overpressure protection for the cooler. The hybrid transmission further uses a proportional pressure reducing valve to control the lock-up clutch, thus making for the improvement of its braking performance.


Patent
Zhejiang Geely Holding Group | Date: 2015-11-03

A power system of a series hybrid vehicle, comprising a fuel source; a control system; at least two auxiliary power units, each of which auxiliary power units, under control of the control system, independently receives fuel from the fuel source, and converts chemical energy in the fuel into electrical energy and outputs the electrical energy to a common current bus; a power battery electrically connected to a common current bus to, under control of the control system, receive electrical energy from the common current bus to perform charging or perform discharging through the common current bus; and a traction motor electrically connected to the common current bus to, under control of the control system, receive electrical energy from the common current bus and convert the electrical energy into mechanical energy and transmit the mechanical energy to a power train of the vehicle so as to drive the vehicle to run.


News Article | November 18, 2010
Site: gigaom.com

Volvo’s all-electric vehicle, the C30, has been hitting the streets of California this week, under going test drives during the LA Auto Show, and being tested in fleets in California starting next week. Volvo’s CEO Stefan Jacoby said in a keynote on the first day of the show on Wednesday that the car, along with a future plug-in hybrid that Volvo plans to launch in 2012, are a sign of a “new chapter in Volvo’s history books.” At the same time there’s also another, decidedly more dramatic, chapter unfolding in Volvo’s time line: in March Chinese auto maker Zhejiang Geely Holding Group, known for its low-cost compacts, announced it would buy the loss-making luxury brand for $1.8 billion from Ford Motor. During the Q&A portion of Jacoby’s talk at the LA Auto Show there were several questions about how Volvo would work to maintain its luxury brand after it was owned by a Chinese firm known for making low-cost cars. But while Volvo works out its overall business strategy, it’s showing a budding interest in EVs, having shied away from the technology for years. The C30 is still in the prototype phase, and Volvo isn’t detailing much about the pricing or launch plans. At the end of the day, it could just end up as an interesting pilot program for the automaker. However, the car is well designed, and is using batteries from EnerDel (subsidiary of Ener1, video with Ener1’s CEO here), which has a factory in Indiana. During a test drive with Volvo exec Lennart Stegland, the car handled well, was roomier feeling than the Nissan LEAF, and had nice stylistic perks in its interior like a toggle shifter and blue-themed lighting. We’ll bring you our video test drive of the car over the coming days via Green Overdrive. For more research on electric cars check out GigaOM Pro (subscription required):


News Article | August 2, 2010
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Volvo's car division was sold from the bigger Volvo home company (which also manufactures commercial vehicles, construction equipment and aerospace components, among a long list of other specialties) to Ford in 1999, with the Swedes making $6.45 billion from the deal, and sharing ownership of the Volvo marque with Ford—who were the only company allowed to use it on cars. Back in 2008 was when the first news surfaced that Ford was interested in selling the Volvo name at the height of the recession, and the marque probably seemed a good option to sell at at time Ford was struck with large losses (and Volvo was never a particularly glamorous name to own anyway: Remember "Buy Volvos: They're boxy, but good!). Presumably Ford pursued several buyers. Whatever negotiations took place, it took until 2010 for a genuine buyer to surface, with Chinese car maker Zhejiang Geely Holding Group (the parent company of Geely Automobile, floated on the Hong Kong stock exchange in 2004) as the interested party. The agreed value was $1.8 billion, but the real-world price wasn't known until today, when Geely added $1.3 billion in cash to its initial $200 million. The absolute value won't be revealed until later in the year, but it wouldn't be surprising to see another hundred million dollars heading to Ford's pockets (due to variations in currency values, and final contract detailing). This purchase will probably go a long way to help Geely's chairman's goal of having two thirds of the company's output sold overseas. It'll also result in Ford seeing a loss of something like $5 billion on the transaction—though, of course, net income from Volvo during the 10 years of Ford ownership will have offset this somewhat. Ford and Geely retain a connection over the Volvo marque's IP, and Ford will continue to supply some parts for the cars. What will Ford do with the money? Here's an idea: Invest it in transforming Ford from a gas-guzzler-maker into a more future-facing and planet-friendly electric car company. After all, it's in the best traditions (well...kinda) of its proud founder. To keep up with this news, follow me, Kit Eaton, on Twitter.

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