Zeton Inc.

Burlington, Canada

Zeton Inc.

Burlington, Canada
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | October 14, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« New Gen5 Honda CR-V gets first turbo, better fuel economy | Main | BorgWarner launches new variable cam timing technology for Hyundai » The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), together with leading petroleum refining technologies supplier W.R. Grace, and leading pilot plant designer Zeton Inc., built a unique pilot-scale facility that can produce biomass-derived fuel intermediates with existing petroleum refinery infrastructure. This pilot plant, constructed in part with funding from the Bioenergy Technologies Office, combines biomass pyrolysis together with fluid catalytic cracking—one of the most important conversion processes used in petroleum refineries—to demonstrate the potential to co-process biomass-derived streams with petroleum, at an industrially-relevant pilot scale. There are 110 domestic fluid catalytic cracking units currently operating in the United States. Using them to co-produce biofuel could enable production of more than 8 billion gallons of bio-derived fuels, without construction of separate biorefineries. This would significantly contribute to the Renewable Fuel Standard mandate set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 to produce 21 billion gallons of advanced renewable transportation fuels by 2022. The front end of this innovative pilot-scale system makes use of fast pyrolysis—the rapid heating of biomass to 400–600 °C in the absence of oxygen followed by cooling the resulting vapors into a liquid bio-oil—-an efficient method for converting all fractions of biomass (about 70% of the total mass and energy) into a liquid product. However, upgrading this liquid product poses unique challenges, as bio-oil is acidic, chemically unstable, and contains more oxygenated compounds than petroleum crude oils. An effective approach to stabilize pyrolysis oil and minimize downstream processing challenges is to catalytically reduce the oxygen content before condensation of the vapors occurs. This step takes place in a separate reactor unit called the Davison Circulating Riser Reactor (DCR), designed by W.R. Grace. NREL’s custom biomass pyrolyzer produces vapors which are then fed to the DCR, where they undergo fluid catalytic cracking to yield a highly deoxygenated oil consisting mainly of hydrocarbons. This product can then be further finished into a conventional fuel blendstock at a petroleum refinery, where existing infrastructure can be leveraged to reduce the overall cost of upgrading. Earlier this year, co-processing verification experiments with biomass-derived vapor and petroleum demonstrated that biomass components were integrated into the liquid gasoline product. Housed within the Vapor Phase Upgrading Laboratory at NREL, the coupled pyrolyzer-DCR pilot plant enables a wide range of experimental conditions for continued catalyst evaluation to improve the quality and yield of the bio-oil intermediate. The data generated on both vapor and fuel product composition from these tests can be used to help inform efforts to enable refinery integration. This equipment will also be available to companies who would benefit from the opportunity to test their materials and processes without the time and expense of building their own pilot plant facility. NREL’s bioenergy research, funded by BETO, is the largest national laboratory bioenergy program across the eleven Energy Department national laboratories that conduct bioenergy research. BETO’s Conversion Research and Development Program aims to drive down the cost of biofuel and bioproducts from non-food sources to a level cost competitive with petroleum-based fuels and products.


Edwards D.,Zeton Inc.
Chemical Engineering Progress | Year: 2015

The stage-gate technique used for traditional chemical processes must be modified for bioenergy technologies. The approach developed for traditional chemical process industries (CPI) projects must be modified to account for challenges related to processing the fluids and handling the solids in bioenergy processes. The scaling factors in going from one scale to the next are an order of magnitude lower for bioenergy processes than for similar CPI processes, due to certain challenges. The stage-gate process divides the scale-up of a technology into stages, each successively larger in scale than the earlier.


Martin P.,Zeton Inc. | Girouard G.,Zeton Inc.
Chemical Engineering Progress | Year: 2014

Existing equations used to size control valves are inadequate for laboratory- and pilot-scale work. Some manufacturers of lab- and pilot-scale control valves are aware of the consequences of laminar flow on sizing and have developed their own methods to correct for this phenomenon. Accordingly, the value of K for any particular valve can be determined through a single experiment with a Newtonian fluid viscous enough and at a flow rate low enough to ensure fully laminar flow through the valve trim. The testing apparatus consisted of a reservoir of liquid that could be pressurized with air or nitrogen, a filter to remove fine particulate matter, an accurate differential- pressure transmitter with tubing tees mounted immediately upstream and downstream of the valve body to connect the pressure-measurement impulse lines, a bucket or vial, and an accurate scale.


Orrell O.,Zeton Inc
11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

Separation processes are an important component of chemical and petrochemical plants. In large facilities, gas/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/liquid/liquid separators can benefit from engineered internals such as coalescing plate packs, weirs, and baffles. In smaller pilot facilities, these internals can be difficult to employ due to size constraints. This session will discuss various approaches of designing and fabricating pilot scale separators that are effective without the benefit of internals available to their full-scale counterparts. The main focus will be on a recent redesign of a small scale three phase separator that has been proven to have less liquid carryover than earlier designs.


Trainor M.,Zeton Inc
Process Development Division 2015 - Core Programming Area at the 2015 AIChE Annual Meeting | Year: 2015

Rationalize relief scenarios for evaluation while going through relief contingency table recognize lower risk associated with pilot scale equipment appreciate unique challenges at pilot scale.


Van Amerom U.,Zeton Inc.
Chemical Engineering Progress | Year: 2011

An overview of hazardous area designations and the electric motor features required for such areas are discussed. Motors for use in environments deemed Class I, Division 1, that is, presence of gaseous hydrocarbon, must be built and labeled as explosion-proof. In addition to having an explosion-proof enclosure, motors for use in Class I, Division 1 locations must not develop surface temperatures hot enough to cause spontaneous ignition of hazardous gases in the external atmosphere. Class II locations contain dust that is either electrically conductive or could be explosive when mixed with air. A totally enclosed, fan-cooled (TEFC) motor, or even an open, drip-proof (ODP) motor, may be used in a Division 2 environment, provided it does not have arc-producing brushes or switching mechanisms, which could act as ignition sources. Safety should be a primary concern when choosing a motor for use in a hazardous environment.


Edwards D.,Zeton Inc.
AIChE 2013 - 2013 AIChE Spring Meeting and 9th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2013

The recommended approach for scaling bioenergy and biofuels technology follows a similar stage gate process to that used in traditional Chemical Process Industry (CPI) processes. However, processing of solids in bioenergy applications leads to some subtle differences and unique challenges that are to be considered. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2013 AIChE Spring Meeting & 9th Global Congress on Process Safety (San Antonio, TX 4/28-5/2/2013).


Trademark
Zeton Inc. | Date: 2014-03-27

Machines and machine tools; machines, prototypes, and production machines, namely, pilot plants, demonstration plants, semi-works plants and modular production plants, as well as combinations thereof, for use in prototyping and evaluating industrial processes. Scientific research apparatus and instruments; Scientific research apparatus and instruments, namely, bench-scale prototype plants, lab scale systems, and bench-scale units, as well as combinations thereof, for use in researching chemical, biological, and industrial processes in a wide variety of industries. Consulting, engineering services, conceptual design studies and feasibility studies in connection with the design and use of machines and scientific research apparatus and instruments, namely, prototype plants, lab scale systems, bench scale units, pilot plants, demonstration plants, semi-works plants and modular production plants, as well as combinations thereof, in a wide variety of industries.


Trademark
Zeton Inc. | Date: 2014-03-27

Machines and machine tools; machines, prototypes, and production machines, namely, pilot plants, demonstration plants, semi-works plants and modular production plants, as well as combinations thereof, for use in prototyping and evaluating industrial processes. Scientific research apparatus and instruments; Scientific research apparatus and instruments, namely, bench-scale prototype plants, lab scale systems, and bench-scale units, as well as combinations thereof, for use in researching chemical, biological, and industrial processes in a wide variety of industries. Consulting, engineering services, conceptual design studies and feasibility studies in connection with the design and use of machines and scientific research apparatus and instruments, namely, prototype plants, lab scale systems, bench scale units, pilot plants, demonstration plants, semi-works plants and modular production plants, as well as combinations thereof, in a wide variety of industries.

Loading Zeton Inc. collaborators
Loading Zeton Inc. collaborators