Time filter

Source Type

Meadows J.,Zentrum fur Baltische und Skandinavische Archaologie | Meadows J.,University of Kiel | Martinelli N.,Dendrodata s.a.s | Pignatelli O.,Dendrodata s.a.s | And 3 more authors.
Radiocarbon | Year: 2012

In 2004, the courtyard of Ca' Foscari University, Venice, was excavated in advance of building work, revealing an unbroken sequence of archaeological deposits. The earliest layers consisted of redeposited natural sediment, packed into wattle structures, a system of land reclamation first described by Cassiodorus in AD 537-8, and now known from several other sites in the city. The ground level was built up and extended several times with successive wattle structures, before the eventual construction of a stone waterfront. We have used Bayesian modeling of dendrochronological, radiocarbon, and stratigraphic dating evidence to obtain a precise chronology for the earliest phases of occupation, and to compare it to the chronology of land reclamation at similar sites elsewhere in Venice. © 2012 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.


Meadows J.,Zentrum fur Baltische und Skandinavische Archaologie | Meadows J.,University of Kiel | Martinelli N.,Dendrodata S.A.S | Nadeau M.-J.,University of Kiel | Citton E.B.,Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici del Veneto
Radiocarbon | Year: 2014

Two floating tree-ring chronologies were developed from oak timbers recovered during salvage excavations of a pre-Roman wharf in Este, a prominent center of the Veneti people, who lived in northeastern Italy during the Iron Age. Wiggle-match radiocarbon dating shows that one chronology spans the 10th and 9th centuries cal BC, and that the waterfront was probably built ~800 cal BC. The second chronology apparently spans most of the 7th century cal BC, and is associated with a phase of construction about 2 centuries after the first. One of the samples gave what appeared to be anomalous 14C results that may best be explained as evidence of a short-term fluctuation in atmospheric 14C level, which can be seen in shortlived samples but is not apparent in the decadal or bidecadal calibration data. Both chronologies cover periods for which there are no other tree-ring chronologies in this region, and could become key to refning the local Iron Age chronology. © 2014 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.


Meadows J.,Zentrum fur Baltische und Skandinavische Archaologie | Meadows J.,University of Kiel | Eriksen B.V.,Zentrum fur Baltische und Skandinavische Archaologie | Zagorska I.,University of Latvia | And 2 more authors.
Radiocarbon | Year: 2014

Over 3000 prehistoric bone and antler artifacts, collected in the late 1930s from the former lakebed of Lake Lubāns, are held by the National History Museum of Latvia. This collection is remarkable not only as one of the largest known assemblages of bone implements in northern Europe, but also in terms of diversity of forms. The most elaborately worked objects include harpoons, often with two rows of barbs and spade-shaped bases, which are believed to date to the Late Paleolithic, and to be among the oldest organic artifacts ever found in Latvia. Four broken specimens were sampled in 2011 for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dating, stable isotope analysis, and taxonomic attribution by ZooMS. The results support the interpretation that these artifacts were made from large cervid bones, and date all four objects to the early Preboreal (mid-10th millennium cal BC). The Lake Lubāns harpoons therefore fall in the same period as similar harpoons from Denmark, northern Germany, and Poland, although only a handful of these have been dated directly. © 2014 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.


Weber M.-J.,Zentrum fur Baltische und Skandinavische Archaologie | Grimm S.B.,Forschungsbereich Altsteinzeit des Romisch Germanischen Zentralmuseums Mainz | Baales M.,LWL Archaologie fur Westfalen
Quaternary International | Year: 2011

Following a thorough review of high-resolution environmental archives, this paper aims at discriminating the factors determining the heterogeneous repercussion of the Lateglacial Younger Dryas in Central Europe. When examining the archaeological implications of human adaptation to the subsequent changes in the natural environment two divergent biotic regions are of special interest: the North European Plain and adjacent areas; and the Alpine foothills and surrounding mountain ranges. In these regions, two different archaeological technocomplexes (traditions) are found: the Tanged Point Complex and the Curve-Backed Point Groups. Considering the distribution of the archaeological sites witnessing changes in the material culture and subsistence pattern, the intensity of the environmental changes caused by the Younger Dryas is a decisive element. Settlement discontinuity during the Younger Dryas is questioned. Moreover, the potential existence of established social networks between the two regions expressed by comparable developments such as microlithization is considered. Finally, the authors assess whether the Younger Dryas acted as an accelerator or a brake in the process of regional diversification prior to the Early Mesolithic. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

Loading Zentrum fur Baltische und Skandinavische Archaologie collaborators
Loading Zentrum fur Baltische und Skandinavische Archaologie collaborators