Zalaegerszeg, Hungary
Zalaegerszeg, Hungary

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Trenkwalder C.,University of Kassel | Kies B.,University of Cape Town | Rudzinska M.,Jagiellonian University | Fine J.,Constantiaberg MediClinic | And 14 more authors.
Movement Disorders | Year: 2011

In a multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (NCT00474058), 287 subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) and unsatisfactory early-morning motor symptom control were randomized 2:1 to receive rotigotine (2-16 mg/24 hr [n = 190]) or placebo (n = 97). Treatment was titrated to optimal dose over 1-8 weeks with subsequent dose maintenance for 4 weeks. Early-morning motor function and nocturnal sleep disturbance were assessed as coprimary efficacy endpoints using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) Part III (Motor Examination) measured in the early morning prior to any medication intake and the modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2) (mean change from baseline to end of maintenance [EOM], last observation carried forward). At EOM, mean UPDRS Part III score had decreased by -7.0 points with rotigotine (from a baseline of 29.6 [standard deviation (SD) 12.3] and by -3.9 points with placebo (baseline 32.0 [13.3]). Mean PDSS-2 total score had decreased by -5.9 points with rotigotine (from a baseline of 19.3 [SD 9.3]) and by -1.9 points with placebo (baseline 20.5 [10.4]). This represented a significantly greater improvement with rotigotine compared with placebo on both the UPDRS Part III (treatment difference: -3.55 [95% confidence interval (CI) -5.37, -1.73]; P = 0.0002) and PDSS-2 (treatment difference: -4.26 [95% CI -6.08, -2.45]; P < 0.0001). The most frequently reported adverse events were nausea (placebo, 9%; rotigotine, 21%), application site reactions (placebo, 4%; rotigotine, 15%), and dizziness (placebo, 6%; rotigotine 10%). Twenty-four-hour transdermal delivery of rotigotine to PD patients with early-morning motor dysfunction resulted in significant benefits in control of both motor function and nocturnal sleep disturbances. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society.


Bessenyei B.,Debrecen University | Nagy A.,Debrecen University | Szakszon K.,Debrecen University | Mokanszki A.,Debrecen University | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2015

Craniosynostosis, the premature closure of cranial sutures, is a common craniofacial disorder with heterogeneous etiology and appearance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and molecular characteristics of craniosynostoses in Hungary, including the classification of patients and the genetic analysis of the syndromic forms. Between 2006 and 2012, 200 patients with craniosynostosis were studied. Classification was based on the suture(s) involved and the associated clinical features. In syndromic cases, genetic analyses, including mutational screening of the hotspot regions of the FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and TWIST1 genes, karyotyping and FISH study of TWIST1, were performed. The majority (88%) of all patients with craniosynostosis were nonsyndromic. The sagittal suture was most commonly involved, followed by the coronal, metopic, and lambdoid sutures. Male, twin gestation, and very low birth weight were risk factors for craniosynostosis. Syndromic craniosynostosis was detected in 24 patients. In 17 of these patients, Apert, Crouzon, Pfeiffer, Muenke, or Saethre-Chotzen syndromes were identified. In one patient, multiple-suture craniosynostosis was associated with achondroplasia. Clinical signs were not typical for any particular syndrome in six patients. Genetic abnormalities were detected in 18 syndromic patients and in 8 relatives. In addition to 10 different, known mutations in FGFR1,FGFR2 or FGFR3, one novel missense mutation, c.528C>G(p.Ser176Arg), was detected in the TWIST1 gene of a patient with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Our results indicate that detailed clinical assessment is of paramount importance in the classification of patients and allows indication of targeted molecular testing with the highest possible diagnostic yield. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Bessenyei B.,Debrecen University | Tihanyi M.,Hospital of Zala County | Hartwig M.,Hospital of Zala County | Szakszon K.,Debrecen University | Olah E.,Debrecen University
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2014

Pfeiffer syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder classically characterized by craniosynostosis, facial dysmorphism and limb anomalies. The majority of cases are caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. A specific, rare mutation p.Pro252Arg, located between the second and third extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain of FGFR1, is associated with mild clinical signs. We report on a three-generation family with five members having a heterozygous FGFR1 p.Pro252Arg mutation. Phenotypic features within the family showed high variability from the apparently normal skull and limbs to the characteristic brachycephaly and digital anomalies. The typical features of Pfeiffer syndrome appeared only in the third generation allowing us to unveil the syndrome in several further family members in two previous generations. Variable expressivity can complicate the recognition of Pfeiffer syndrome, principally the mild type 1, requiring careful phenotyping and genetic counseling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Hospital of Zala County and Debrecen University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of medical genetics. Part A | Year: 2016

Craniosynostosis, the premature closure of cranial sutures, is a common craniofacial disorder with heterogeneous etiology and appearance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and molecular characteristics of craniosynostoses in Hungary, including the classification of patients and the genetic analysis of the syndromic forms. Between 2006 and 2012, 200 patients with craniosynostosis were studied. Classification was based on the suture(s) involved and the associated clinical features. In syndromic cases, genetic analyses, including mutational screening of the hotspot regions of the FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and TWIST1 genes, karyotyping and FISH study of TWIST1, were performed. The majority (88%) of all patients with craniosynostosis were nonsyndromic. The sagittal suture was most commonly involved, followed by the coronal, metopic, and lambdoid sutures. Male, twin gestation, and very low birth weight were risk factors for craniosynostosis. Syndromic craniosynostosis was detected in 24 patients. In 17 of these patients, Apert, Crouzon, Pfeiffer, Muenke, or Saethre-Chotzen syndromes were identified. In one patient, multiple-suture craniosynostosis was associated with achondroplasia. Clinical signs were not typical for any particular syndrome in six patients. Genetic abnormalities were detected in 18 syndromic patients and in 8 relatives. In addition to 10 different, known mutations in FGFR1,FGFR2 or FGFR3, one novel missense mutation, c.528C>G(p.Ser176Arg), was detected in the TWIST1 gene of a patient with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Our results indicate that detailed clinical assessment is of paramount importance in the classification of patients and allows indication of targeted molecular testing with the highest possible diagnostic yield.

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