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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its ranking of Nebraska’s best colleges for 2017. Of the 20 four-year schools included on the list, Creighton University, Nebraska Wesleyan University, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Doane College Crete and Hastings College were the top five schools. Of the 9 two-year schools included in the ranking, Western Nebraska Community College, Mid-Plains Community College, Metropolitan Community College, Northeast Community College and Southeast Community College were the top five. A full list of schools is included below. “A strong educational foundation can open a lot of doors when it comes to starting a new career,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “These Nebraska colleges and universities have distinguished themselves by providing excellent service to student through quality degree programs and career resources.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Nebraska” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also analyzed based on additional metrics including program offerings, employment services, academic counseling, opportunities for financial aid, graduation rates and student/teacher ratios. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Nebraska” list, visit: Nebraska’s Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Bellevue University Chadron State College Clarkson College College of Saint Mary Concordia University-Nebraska Creighton University Doane College-Crete Grace University Hastings College Midland University Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing & Allied Health Nebraska Wesleyan University Peru State College Union College University of Nebraska at Kearney University of Nebraska at Omaha University of Nebraska Medical Center University of Nebraska-Lincoln Wayne State College York College Nebraska’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Central Community College Little Priest Tribal College Metropolitan Community College Mid-Plains Community College Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture Nebraska Indian Community College Northeast Community College Southeast Community College Western Nebraska Community College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Mississauga, Canada, April 28, 2017 --( The majority of healthcare consumers now rely on the internet for reliable practice and practitioner reference information. Doctors’ Choice Awards was created to provide this resource in the form of valid and verified reviews of doctors, by doctors. Their professional opinions bring in-depth insight to consumers. Dr. Shah’s National Award illustrates his position in the industry as an innovator and educator, and above all as a knowledgeable and caring physician. The National Award is the result of amassing the most positive reviews in the Doctors’ Choice Awards program, of all nominees, in 2016. Dr. Shah received 40 affirmative reviews from other doctors. This placed him at the top of the dermatology specialty. “I am so honored to receive this award,” Shah said. “I work very hard to provide the best possible patient experience at my practice, and to share my knowledge with others. It is inspiring to see that my efforts are recognized by colleagues.” About Dr. Shah Dr. Shah earned a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Lehman College, and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine designation at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. He completed internship at St. Barnabas Hospital, and residency in family medicine at Massapequa General Hospital and Wyckoff Heights Medical Center. His love of dermatology led to specialization at Advanced Dermatology & Laser Center. For nearly 15 years, Dr. Shah has demonstrated dedication, passion, and enthusiasm for his work. About Doctors’ Choice Awards The Doctors’ Choice Awards platform brings doctors from various medical fields together to set benchmarks for unsurpassed patient care. This unique concept brings uncommon credibility to the published reviews. DCA awards may only be earned – not purchased. The service is intended to facilitate advancement of medical services in a given region, bring new choices to consumers and fresh opportunities to physicians. For more information, contact: Dr. Ayyaz Shah Shah Dermatology Phone – 407-730-3187 Email – shahderm786@msn.com Website – www.shahdermatology.com Andra Salim Doctors’ Choice Awards Phone – 312-239-0638 Email – andra@doctorschoiceawards.org Website – www.doctorschoiceawards.org Mississauga, Canada, April 28, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Doctors’ Choice Awards recently announced their National Award Winners in each practice specialty. This prestigious honor was bestowed upon Dr. Ayyaz Shah in the area of dermatology, in recognition of his outstanding reputation among peers in the medical community. Dr. Shah is founder and president of Shah Dermatology in Orlando, FL, and medical director at a number of other institutions. He also serves as Assistant Professor of Dermatology at UCF College of Medicine.The majority of healthcare consumers now rely on the internet for reliable practice and practitioner reference information. Doctors’ Choice Awards was created to provide this resource in the form of valid and verified reviews of doctors, by doctors. Their professional opinions bring in-depth insight to consumers. Dr. Shah’s National Award illustrates his position in the industry as an innovator and educator, and above all as a knowledgeable and caring physician.The National Award is the result of amassing the most positive reviews in the Doctors’ Choice Awards program, of all nominees, in 2016. Dr. Shah received 40 affirmative reviews from other doctors. This placed him at the top of the dermatology specialty.“I am so honored to receive this award,” Shah said. “I work very hard to provide the best possible patient experience at my practice, and to share my knowledge with others. It is inspiring to see that my efforts are recognized by colleagues.”About Dr. ShahDr. Shah earned a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Lehman College, and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine designation at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. He completed internship at St. Barnabas Hospital, and residency in family medicine at Massapequa General Hospital and Wyckoff Heights Medical Center. His love of dermatology led to specialization at Advanced Dermatology & Laser Center. For nearly 15 years, Dr. Shah has demonstrated dedication, passion, and enthusiasm for his work.About Doctors’ Choice AwardsThe Doctors’ Choice Awards platform brings doctors from various medical fields together to set benchmarks for unsurpassed patient care. This unique concept brings uncommon credibility to the published reviews. DCA awards may only be earned – not purchased. The service is intended to facilitate advancement of medical services in a given region, bring new choices to consumers and fresh opportunities to physicians.For more information, contact:Dr. Ayyaz ShahShah DermatologyPhone – 407-730-3187Email – shahderm786@msn.comWebsite – www.shahdermatology.comAndra SalimDoctors’ Choice AwardsPhone – 312-239-0638Email – andra@doctorschoiceawards.orgWebsite – www.doctorschoiceawards.org Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from DoctorsChoiceAwards


Hu J.-Y.,York College | Schacher S.,York College
Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2014

Short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity are cellular correlates of learning and memory of different durations. Little is known, however, how these two forms of plasticity interact at the same synaptic connection. We examined the reciprocal impact of short-term heterosynaptic or homosynaptic plasticity at sensorimotor synapses of Aplysia in cell culture when expressing persistent long-term facilitation (P-LTF) evoked by serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]. Short-term heterosynaptic plasticity induced by 5-HT (facilitation) or the neuropeptide FMRFa (depression) and short-term homosynaptic plasticity induced by tetanus [post-tetanic potentiation (PTP)] or low-frequency stimulation [homosynaptic depression (HSD)] of the sensory neuron were expressed in both control synapses and synapses expressing P-LTF in the absence or presence of protein synthesis inhibitors. All forms of short-term plasticity failed to significantly affect ongoing P-LTF in the absence of protein synthesis inhibitors. However, P-LTF reversed to control levels when either 5-HT or FMRFa was applied in the presence of rapamycin. In contrast, P-LTF was unaffected when either PTP or HSD was evoked in the presence of either rapamycin or anisomycin. These results indicate that synapses expressing persistent plasticity acquire a "new" baseline and functionally express short-term changes as naive synapses, but the new baseline becomes labile following selective activations- heterosynaptic stimuli that evoke opposite forms of plasticity-such that when presented in the presence of protein synthesis inhibitors produce a rapid reversal of the persistent plasticity. Activity-selective induction of a labile state at synapses expressing persistent plasticity may facilitate the development of therapies for reversing inappropriate memories. © 2014 the authors.


Miller K.D.,York College
Current Opinion in Neurobiology | Year: 2016

The idea that there is a fundamental cortical circuit that performs canonical computations remains compelling though far from proven. Here we review evidence for two canonical operations within sensory cortical areas: a feedforward computation of selectivity; and a recurrent computation of gain in which, given sufficiently strong external input, perhaps from multiple sources, intracortical input largely, but not completely, cancels this external input. This operation leads to many characteristic cortical nonlinearities in integrating multiple stimuli. The cortical computation must combine such local processing with hierarchical processing across areas. We point to important changes in moving from sensory cortex to motor and frontal cortex and the possibility of substantial differences between cortex in rodents vs. species with columnar organization of selectivity. © 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.


Zhang X.,York College
The Journal of general physiology | Year: 2014

Orai proteins contribute to Ca(2+) entry into cells through both store-dependent, Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels (Orai1) and store-independent, arachidonic acid (AA)-regulated Ca(2+) (ARC) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4)-regulated Ca(2+) (LRC) channels (Orai1/3 heteromultimers). Although activated by fundamentally different mechanisms, CRAC channels, like ARC and LRC channels, require stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1). The role of endoplasmic reticulum-resident STIM1 (ER-STIM1) in CRAC channel activation is widely accepted. Although ER-STIM1 is necessary and sufficient for LRC channel activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the minor pool of STIM1 located at the plasma membrane (PM-STIM1) is necessary for ARC channel activation in HEK293 cells. To determine whether ARC and LRC conductances are mediated by the same or different populations of STIM1, Orai1, and Orai3 proteins, we used whole-cell and perforated patch-clamp recording to compare AA- and LTC4-activated currents in VSMCs and HEK293 cells. We found that both cell types show indistinguishable nonadditive LTC4- and AA-activated currents that require both Orai1 and Orai3, suggesting that both conductances are mediated by the same channel. Experiments using a nonmetabolizable form of AA or an inhibitor of 5-lipooxygenase suggested that ARC and LRC currents in both cell types could be activated by either LTC4 or AA, with LTC4 being more potent. Although PM-STIM1 was required for current activation by LTC4 and AA under whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in both cell types, ER-STIM1 was sufficient with perforated patch recordings. These results demonstrate that ARC and LRC currents are mediated by the same cellular populations of STIM1, Orai1, and Orai3, and suggest a complex role for both ER-STIM1 and PM-STIM1 in regulating these store-independent Orai1/3 channels.


Reiner S.L.,York College | Adams W.C.,York College
Nature Reviews Immunology | Year: 2014

The cellular progeny of a clonally selected lymphocyte must execute function. However, their function must often occur in more than one way, in more than one place and at more than one time. Experimental evidence supports the view that a single activated lymphocyte can produce a variety of cellular descendants. The mechanisms that are responsible for generating diversity among the progeny of a single lymphocyte remain a subject of lively controversy. Some groups have suggested stochastic mechanisms that are analogous to the diversification of the antigen receptor repertoire. We suggest that the complexity of lymphocyte fates in space and time can be derived from a single naive lymphocyte using the principles of cell diversification that are common in developmental and regenerative biology, including (but not limited to) asymmetric cell division. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Pontzer H.,York College
Current Anthropology | Year: 2012

Models for the origin of the genus Homo propose that increased quality of diet led to changes in ranging ecology and selection for greater locomotor economy, speed, and endurance. Here, I examine the fossil evidence for postcranial change in early Homo and draw on comparative data from living mammals to assess whether increased diet quality has led to selection for improved locomotor performance in other lineages. Body mass estimates indicate early Homo, both males and females, were approximately 33% larger than australopiths, consistent with archeological evidence indicating an ecological change with the origins of our genus. However, many of the postcranial features thought to be derived in Homo, including longer hind limbs, are present in Australopithecus, challenging the hypothesis that early Homo is marked by significant change in walking and running performance. Analysis of energy budgets across mammals suggests that the larger body mass and increased diet quality in early Homo may reflect an increase in the hominin energy budget. Expanding the energy budget would enable greater investment in reproduction without decreasing energy available for larger brains or increased activity. Food sharing and increased adiposity, which decrease variance in food energy availability, may have been integral to this metabolic strategy. © 2012 by The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research.All rights reserved.


Patent
York College | Date: 2016-02-05

A device for assisting individuals having impaired motor skill to actuate a selectable region of touch screen input of a portable computing device. The touch screen is secured in a housing, which includes an operator hand support structure. The hand support include a member for placement of the palm of the operator and allowing the palm to move the hand support structure to a selectable one of a plurality of regions of the touch screen and pivot downwardly to assist the operator to touch activate the touch screen input at the selected region. The device further includes a faceplate, which is positionable over the touch screen and has openings corresponding to the input regions of the touch screen input without interfering with the movement of the hand support. The sidewalls of the faceplate are of sufficient height to assist the operators actuation of the intended region of the touch screen and inhibiting the operator from unintentional actuation of an adjacent region. The housing still further includes tabletop support for positioning the touch screen input at one of a plurality of selectable angles to facilitate ease of operation. The tabletop support can be repositioned to enclose the touch screen input.


A major goal of current efforts to improve life science education is to provide opportunities for students to engage in original research. The Bridge to Research in Environmental and Applied Genomics (BREAM) project is a scaffolded inquiry-based teaching and learning module that seeks to develop, implement, and assess a transformative STEM experience for first-year students through inquiry-based, relevant science experiences. The long-term goal is to develop a model for undergraduate research that provides students with early research experience in a relevant and truly meaningful social context at an urban college. In the context of a pressing local environmental issue, the restoration of Jamaica Bay in New York City, students will learn to use cutting-edge scientific tools, such as applied environmental metagenomics, to investigate ecosystem function and the restoration of urban estuaries. The project will be implemented at York College/CUNY, drawing participants from a diverse student population. This effort is ideally timed to take advantage of the newly energized relationship between CUNY, the City of New York, and other partners with the goal of understanding and restoring Jamaica Bay.

This project will bring together several research-informed practices (such as problem-based learning, authentic research experiences, and scaffolded instruction) that have been shown to be effective in STEM education with more novel elements intended to improve student motivation, confidence and expertise. Scaffolded activities will introduce students to concepts like hypothesis development, scientific literature review, and experimental design, with an overwhelming emphasis on active participation. The project will assess whether explicit scaffolding in an inquiry-based program improves learning and retention in STEM majors. Project outcomes will be rigorously assessed by external evaluators based on measured changes in scientific literacy, critical thinking skills, and communication. The BREAM module will be ultimately disseminated to educators at regional two- and four-year institutions through seminars and training workshops.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: I-Corps | Award Amount: 50.00K | Year: 2015

Urban students, especially those living in poverty who come from minority groups, continue to perform far below their more affluent, suburban, white peers in these areas vital to personal and community 21st century success. However, while high school graduation remains a concern in cities such as New York and across the United States, the gap between high school graduation and college readiness has become a national educational priority. Every year, thousands of students in the United States enroll in college without the skills needed to succeed academically and in need of remediation that is costly in time and money, both for the students themselves and the community at large. The proposed program developed by this team seeks to address the high school to college gap by targeting schools with low rates of college readiness and developing a STEM-learning and college-going culture in the school community. The proposed Peer Enabled Restructured Classroom (PERC) Program improves secondary school STEM teaching and learning while dramatically increasing college readiness for middle performing urban high school students. The PERC Program is an instructional model that is proven to change the trajectory of urban youth--mostly minority students living in poverty--from barely graduating from high school to being prepared for college success. This program was developed with the understanding that STEM courses, with ever increasing standards for mastery, remain as gateways for high school achievement.

The PERC Program is founded on the principle of learning through teaching and leadership and is designed to build a cadre of peer leaders in schools who work along with the teachers to address the needs of peers in STEM classes. Through the PERC model, teachers and peer leaders form an instructional team and work daily to meet the needs of high school students. In this transformative program, peer leaders, called Teaching Assistant Scholars, or TAS, are themselves students who have not yet met the college-ready benchmarks and are often overlooked as potential school or academic leaders. Through the act of teaching and leadership, TAS grow into the role of leaders and scholars and emerge from high school college-ready and confident in STEM. Through the act of developing strong TAS, STEM teachers become more reflective about their practice and use TAS feedback to improve instruction. With the support of their peers, high school students become more confident and capable in STEM. Critical components of the PERC Program support the work of the PERC teachers and TAS. A strong professional development program introduces the teachers to their new classroom roles and identities, sustains their growth as managers of instructional teams, and develops the skills they need to teach and mentor the TAS. The TAS Pipeline-to-College begins with the TAS Class, which focuses on learning to teach, learning to learn, STEM content, and knowledge about college. The pipeline then offers TAS advanced courses and a bridge to college program extending into freshman year. A highly successful summer institute acts as a teacher professional development laboratory, offers internship opportunities to TAS, enables TAS to take courses to advance college readiness or earn college credits, and provides additional STEM learning opportunities for struggling students. The proposed project will take the PERC Program from an NSF-funded research project to a commercially viable program available to school districts across New York State and the country.

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