Seoul, South Korea
Seoul, South Korea

Yonsei University ) is a private research university located in Seoul, South Korea. Yonsei was established in 1885 and is one of the oldest universities in South Korea.The student body consists of 38,725 students: 26,731 undergraduate students, 11,994 graduate students, 4,518 faculty members, 6,788 staff, and 257,931 alumni. Today, Yonsei operates its main campus in Seoul that have extensive programs in the Korean and English language.The university was formally established in January, 1957 through the union of Yonhi College and Severance Union Medical College . This was a result of a lasting bilateral cooperation between the two colleges that began in the 1920s. The institutions were new to Korea at the time of their inception — Yonhi College was one of the first modern colleges, founded originally as Chosun Christian College in March, 1915, and Severance has its roots in the first modern medical center in Korea, Gwanghyewon , founded in April, 1885. As a tribute, the name 'Yonsei' was derived from the first syllables of the names of its two parent institutions, 'Yon; 연; 延' from Yonhi College and 'Sei; 세; 世' from Severance Union Medical College. Wikipedia.


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A preparation method for a magnetic composite for treating and diagnosing cancer. The method may include a step of pyrolyzing a precursor of a magnetic nanoparticle in the presence of a conjugated polymer. The preparation method for a magnetic composite can produce a magnetic composite economically and efficiently because a magnetic composite comprising a magnetic nanoparticle coated with a conjugated polymer can be prepared by a single process.


The present invention relates to a method for selective cell attachment/detachment, cell patternization and cell harvesting by means of near infrared rays. More particularly, conducting polymers or metal oxides having exothermic characteristics upon irradiation of near infrared light is used as a cell culture scaffold, thus selectively attaching/detaching cells without an enzyme treatment. The scaffold has an effect of promoting proliferation or differentiation of stem cells, and therefore, can be used as a stem cell culture scaffold. The scaffold enables cell attachment/detachment without temporal or spatial restrictions, thus enabling cell patternization.


Provided are anisotropic conductive materials, electronic devices including anisotropic conductive materials, and/or methods of manufacturing the electronic devices. An anisotropic conductive material may include a plurality of particles in a matrix material layer. At least some of the particles may include a core portion and a shell portion covering the core portion. The core portion may include a conductive material that is in a liquid state at a temperature greater than 15 C. and less than or equal to about 110 C. or less. For example, the core portion may include at least one of a liquid metal, a low melting point solder, and a nanofiller. The shell portion may include an insulating material. A bonding portion formed by using the anisotropic conductive material may include the core portion outflowed from the particle and may further include an intermetallic compound.


Patent
Qualcomm and Yonsei University | Date: 2015-09-14

Error detection and correction decoding apparatus performs single error correction-double error detection (SEC-DED) or double error correction-triple error detection (DEC-TED) depending on whether the data input contains a single-bit error or a multiple-bit error, to reduce power consumption and latency in case of single-bit errors and to provide powerful error correction in case of multiple-bit errors.


Patent
Yonsei University | Date: 2016-08-24

A method and device for transforming 2D images into 3D are disclosed. The disclosed device includes a dictionary storage unit configured to store a word-depth gradient dictionary; a color patch obtainer unit configured to obtain color patches from an input image; a matching word search unit configured to transform each of the color patches obtained by the color patch obtainer unit into a SIFT descriptor form and search for words closest to the SIFT descriptors of the obtained color patches from among the words of the word-depth gradient dictionary; a matching depth gradient obtainer unit configured to obtain depth gradient information of the words matching the obtained color patches from the word-depth gradient dictionary; and a depth map generation unit configured to compute a depth from the obtained matching depth gradient for each of the obtained color patches and generate a depth map.


Patent
Yonsei University | Date: 2016-09-13

A VOC detection sensor includes: a photoemission acceleration unit including a first electrode and a second electrode spaced apart from each other to face each other and a power source unit forming an electric field between the first electrode and the second electrode, photoemission means disposed within a space formed by the first electrode and second electrode of the photoemission acceleration unit and emitting photoelectrons, a light source supplying light energy by which the photoemission means emits photoelectrons, and an ammeter measuring the amount of charges flowing between the first electrode and the second electrode, wherein VOCs in the space between the first electrode and the second electrode are ionized through a collision against photoelectrons accelerated by the photoemission acceleration unit, and the ammeter detects a concentration of the VOCs by measuring the amount of charges formed by the ionized VOCs between the first electrode and the second electrode.


Patent
Yonsei University | Date: 2016-09-15

Provided is a highly sensitive pressure sensor that includes a lower substrate on which a first electrode having surface roughness is formed; an upper substrate on which a second electrode having surface roughness is formed; and a dielectric material stacked between the lower substrate and the upper substrate to be disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode.


Patent
LG Corp and Yonsei University | Date: 2014-12-16

Provided are an airborne microbial measurement apparatus and a method of measuring the same. The airborne microbial measurement apparatus includes a particle separation device including a main body having a flow space in which airborne microorganism flows and a collection unit separably coupled to one side of the main body to collect the airborne microorganism, a reagent container in which a lysis reagent reacting with the airborne microorganism collected in the collection unit and a luminous material are stored, and a luminescence measurement device for measuring intensity of light emitted after the airborne microorganism reacts with the lysis reagent and the luminous material.


Provided are a tube-type lens usable for accurately detecting a plasma state in a plasma process, an optical emission spectroscopy (OES) apparatus including the tube-type lens, a plasma monitoring system including the OES apparatus, and a method of manufacturing a semiconductor device by using the plasma monitoring system. The tube-type lens includes: a cylindrical tube; a first lens disposed at an entrance of the cylindrical tube, on which light is incident, the first lens including a central portion which prevents transmission of the light and a second lens disposed at an exit of the cylindrical tube, from which the light exits.


Patent
Yonsei University | Date: 2015-01-09

Disclosed is a method for predicting cancer prognosis, comprising: forming gene pairs by using a plurality of genes to be tested; determining clusters for the formed gene pairs through a clustering method; calculating a distribution of each gene pair based on the determined cluster; and selecting reference gene pairs for determining a class based on the calculated distribution.


Patent
Yonsei University | Date: 2016-08-04

Disclosed is a rear-view camera system for a vehicle. The rear-view camera system for a vehicle according to one embodiment of the present invention includes at least one wide-angle lens and at least one standard lens, and may take a rear image of the vehicle using the wide-angle lens or the standard lens. According to the embodiment of the present invention, it is possible to reduce an accident risk, while the vehicle is reversing, by providing an image taken through the wide-angle lens or an image taken through the standard lens according to a distance between the vehicle and an object located at a rear thereof or a users selection, and also to observe rules of parking etiquette without any difficulty.


Patent
Electronics, Telecommunications Research Institute and Yonsei University | Date: 2016-07-08

A fitness device-based simulator and a simulation method using the simulator. The fitness device-based simulator includes a feature point extraction unit for acquiring action-sensing information of a user who is located on a fitness device, and extracting feature points for a body skeletal structure of the user based on the action-sensing information, a feature point cluster generation unit for generating multiple feature point clusters by clustering two or more of the feature points, and setting respective cluster symbols for multiple feature point clusters, an exercise pattern information accumulation unit for generating and storing information about a state transition between the multiple feature point clusters of the user, and an exercise state prediction unit for predicting a subsequent exercise state of the user by predicting a feature point cluster subsequent to a feature point cluster currently being generated for the user, based on state transition information.


Patent
Samsung and Yonsei University | Date: 2016-07-28

Provided is a semiconductor memory device. The semiconductor memory device includes: a memory cell; a sensing circuit connected to the memory cell via a first bit line and a second bit line different from the first bit line, the sensing circuit configured to sense data stored in the memory cell; and a bit line voltage control circuit connected to the memory cell via the first bit line and the second bit line, the bit line voltage control circuit configured to precharge the first bit line to a first voltage that is lower than a supply voltage and to precharge the second bit line to a second voltage that is lower than the supply voltage and is different from the first voltage.


Provided are anisotropic conductive materials, electronic devices including anisotropic conductive materials, and/or methods of manufacturing the electronic devices. An anisotropic conductive material may include a plurality of particles in a matrix material layer. At least some of the particles may include a core portion and a shell portion covering the core portion. The core portion may include a conductive material that is in a liquid state at a temperature greater than 15 C and less than or equal to about 110C or less. For example, the core portion may include at least one of a liquid metal, a low melting point solder, and a nanofiller. The shell portion may include an insulating material. A bonding portion formed by using the anisotropic conductive material may include the core portion outflowed from the particle and may further include an intermetallic compound.


Patent
Pacific System Co. and Yonsei University | Date: 2017-01-11

Disclosed are a micelle containing bubbles for drug delivery and a method for manufactuing the same. The micelle formed according to the present invention includes microbubbles fromed by evaporating the liquiefied inert gas due to the irradiation of ultrasonic waves to a solution in which the liquefied inert gas is mixed with a drug for disease treatment, and the micelle is formed as a unit structure in which the microbubbles are contained in a cavity and the cavity is enclosed in a shell, and delivers the drug to the human body. Therefore, the micelle can protect a material of the drug, which is delivered to the human body, as well as deliver a larger amount of the drug than the existing technique, and can be easily applied to the treatment of various diseases.


Patent
Yonsei University | Date: 2017-02-08

Disclosed is a rear-view camera system for a vehicle. The rear-view camera system for a vehicle according to one embodiment of the present invention includes at least one wide-angle lens and at least one standard lens, and may take a rear image of the vehicle using the wide-angle lens or the standard lens. According to the embodiment of the present invention, it is possible to reduce an accident risk, while the vehicle is reversing, by providing an image taken through the wide-angle lens or an image taken through the standard lens according to a distance between the vehicle and an object located at a rear thereof or a users selection, and also to observe rules of parking etiquette without any difficulty.


The present application relates to a kit for diagnosing pancreatic cancer, a method for providing information for diagnosing pancreatic cancer using the kit, and a method for diagnosing pancreatic cancer using same, wherein the kit includes an antibody specifically binding to complement factor B protein and an antibody specifically binding to carbohydrate antigen 19-9 protein. According to the present application, it is possible to provide a marker for diagnosing pancreatic cancer having enhanced sensitivity and specificity.


Patent
Samsung and Yonsei University | Date: 2017-04-12

A graphene device and a method of operating the same are provided. The graphene device includes: an active layer including a plurality of meta atoms spaced apart from each other, each of the meta atoms having a radial shape, and a graphene layer that contacts each of the plurality of meta atoms; and a dielectric layer covering the active layer.


Patent
Samsung and Yonsei University | Date: 2017-04-12

The present invention relates to a device and a method for calculating a biological brain age by measuring a brain cortex thickness of each region in a brain MRI image of a person to be examined, and comparing the measured brain cortex thickness with normal control group information, and the device includes: an image information input unit configured to input an MRI brain image of a person to be examined; a brain age calculation control unit configured to control a biological brain age calculation operation of the person to be examined based on the MRI brain image; a brain thickness measuring unit configured to measure a brain cortex thickness of each region in the MRI brain image; and a brain age calculating unit configured to match the measured brain cortex thickness with a normal range of brain thickness of each age, and calculate a biological brain age of the person to be examined.


Gee H.Y.,Yonsei University | Noh S.H.,Yonsei University | Tang B.L.,National University of Singapore | Kim K.H.,Yonsei University | Lee M.G.,Yonsei University
Cell | Year: 2011

The most prevalent disease-causing mutation of CFTR is the deletion of Phe508 (ΔF508), which leads to defects in conventional Golgi-mediated exocytosis and cell surface expression. We report that ΔF508-CFTR surface expression can be rescued in vitro and in vivo by directing it to an unconventional GRASP-dependent secretion pathway. An integrated molecular and physiological analysis indicates that mechanisms associated with ER stress induce cell surface trafficking of the ER core-glycosylated wild-type and ΔF508-CFTR via the GRASP-dependent pathway. Phosphorylation of a specific site of GRASP and the PDZ-based interaction between GRASP and CFTR are critical for this unconventional surface trafficking. Remarkably, transgenic expression of GRASP in ΔF508-CFTR mice restores CFTR function and rescues mouse survival without apparent toxicity. These findings provide insight into how unconventional protein secretion is activated, and offer a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis and perhaps diseases stemming from other misfolded proteins. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-08-2014 | Award Amount: 25.06M | Year: 2015

The TBVAC2020 proposal builds on the highly successful and long-standing collaborations in subsequent EC-FP5-, FP6- and FP7-funded TB vaccine and biomarker projects, but also brings in a large number of new key partners from excellent laboratories from Europe, USA, Asia, Africa and Australia, many of which are global leaders in the TB field. This was initiated by launching an open call for Expressions of Interest (EoI) prior to this application and to which interested parties could respond. In total, 115 EoIs were received and ranked by the TBVI Steering Committee using proposed H2020 evaluation criteria. This led to the prioritisation of 52 R&D approaches included in this proposal. TBVAC2020 aims to innovate and diversify the current TB vaccine and biomarker pipeline while at the same time applying portfolio management using gating and priority setting criteria to select as early as possible the most promising TB vaccine candidates, and accelerate their development. TBVAC2020 proposes to achieve this by combining creative bottom-up approaches for vaccine discovery (WP1), new preclinical models addressing clinical challenges (WP2) and identification and characterisation of correlates of protection (WP5) with a directive top-down portfolio management approach aiming to select the most promising TB vaccine candidates by their comparative evaluation using objective gating and priority setting criteria (WP6) and by supporting direct, head-to head or comparative preclinical and early clinical evaluation (WP3, WP4). This approach will both innovate and diversify the existing TB vaccine and biomarker pipeline as well as accelerate development of most promising TB vaccine candidates through early development stages. The proposed approach and involvement of many internationally leading groups in the TB vaccine and biomarker area in TBVAC2020 fully aligns with the Global TB Vaccine Partnerships (GTBVP).


Patent
Yonsei University and Sangji University | Date: 2015-11-09

Disclosed herein is a bidirectional alternating application system for preventing or treating a brain tumor caused by malignant glioma cells in animals. The bidirectional alternating magnetic field application system can apply a magnetic field having weak intensity and low frequency to patients in need of the prevention or treatment of brain tumor to thereby specifically inhibit the proliferation and mobility of glioma cells without causing any damage to normal cells. Thus, the bidirectional alternating magnetic field application system can greatly reduce side effects occurring in patients after surgery.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-10-2016 | Award Amount: 8.10M | Year: 2016

Blue-Action will provide fundamental and empirically-grounded, executable science that quantifies and explains the role of a changing Arctic in increasing predictive capability of weather and climate of the Northern Hemisphere.To achieve this Blue-Action will take a transdisciplinary approach, bridging scientific understanding within Arctic climate, weather and risk management research, with key stakeholder knowledge of the impacts of climatic weather extremes and hazardous events; leading to the co-design of better services.This bridge will build on innovative statistical and dynamical approaches to predict weather and climate extremes. In dialogue with users, Blue-Arctic will take stock in existing knowledge about cross-sectoral impacts and vulnerabilities with respect to the occurrence of these events when associated to weather and climate predictions. Modeling and prediction capabilities will be enhanced by targeting firstly, lower latitude oceanic and atmospheric drivers of regional Arctic changes and secondly, Arctic impacts on Northern Hemisphere climate and weather extremes. Coordinated multi-model experiments will be key to test new higher resolution model configurations, innovative methods to reduce forecast error, and advanced methods to improve uptake of new Earth observations assets are planned. Blue-Action thereby demonstrates how such an uptake may assist in creating better optimized observation system for various modelling applications. The improved robust and reliable forecasting can help meteorological and climate services to better deliver tailored predictions and advice, including sub-seasonal to seasonal time scales, will take Arctic climate prediction beyond seasons and to teleconnections over the Northern Hemisphere. Blue-Action will through its concerted efforts therefore contribute to the improvement of climate models to represent Arctic warming realistically and address its impact on regional and global atmospheric and oceanic circulation.


Patent
National University of Singapore and Yonsei University | Date: 2015-04-28

Embodiments of the invention provide a method for fabricating a magnetoresistive device. The method comprises: releasing a multi-layer magnetoresistive structure for forming the magnetoresistive device from a first substrate to relax an intrinsic stress in the multi-layer magnetoresistive structure such that the magnetic and/or magnetoresistive properties of the magnetoresistive device can be improved. The magnetic and/or magnetoresistive properties include, but are not limited to coercivity, squareness or abruptness of switching, magnetoresistance (MR) and resistance of the magnetoresistive device.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.3.2-2 | Award Amount: 19.00M | Year: 2010

With 14.4 million prevalent cases and 1.7 million deaths tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most serious infectious diseases to date. An estimated 2 billion people are believed to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and at risk of developing disease. Multi- and extensively drug resistant strains are increasingly appearing in many parts of the world, including Europe. While with current control measures the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set for 2015 may be achieved, reaching these would still leave a million people per year dying from TB. Much more effective measures, particularly more effective vaccines will be essential to reach the target of eliminating TB in 2050. Two successive FP5 and FP6 funded projects, Tuberculosis (TB) Vaccine Cluster (2000-2003) and TBVAC (2004-2008), have in the recent decade made significant contributions to the global TB vaccine pipeline, with four vaccines (out of nine globally) being advanced to clinical stages. Both projects strongly contributed to the strengthening and integration of expertise and led to a European focus of excellence that is unique in the area of TB vaccine development. In order to sustain and accelerate the TB vaccine developments and unique integrated excellence of TBVAC, a specific legal entity was created named TuBerculosis Vaccine Initiative (TBVI). The NEWTBVAC proposal is the FP7 successor of TBVAC, and will be coordinated by TBVI. The proposal has the following objectives : 1) To sustain and innovate the current European pipeline with new vaccine discoveries and advance promising candidates to clinical stages; 2) To design new, second generation vaccines based new prime-boost strategies and/or new (combinations of) promising subunit vaccines, that will impact on reduction of disease in exposed individuals; 3) To sustain and innovate discovery, evaluation and testing of new biomarkers, that will be critically important for future monitoring of clinical trials.


Ultrasensitive detection of nanoscale particles has applications in important fields ranging from environmental monitoring to analysis of viral structures. However, it remains extremely difficult due to ultralow polarizability of small-sized, low-index particles. A team led by Professor Xiao Yun-Feng at Peking University, collaborated with Yonsei University of Republic of Korea, demonstrated experimentally that the dissipative interaction in a high-Q optical microcavity allows the detection of single nanoparticles. This work has been published in a recent issue of Physical Review Applied.


News Article | March 7, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

​Ultrasensitive detection of nanoscale particles has applications in important fields ranging from environmental monitoring to analysis of viral structures. However, it remains extremely difficult due to ultralow polarizabilities of small-sized, low-index particles. A team led by Professor Xiao Yun-Feng at Peking University, collaborating with Yonsei University of the Republic of Korea, demonstrated experimentally that the dissipative interaction in a high-Q optical microcavity allows the detection of single nanoparticles. This work has been published in the recent issue of Physical Review Applied. Over the past few years, high-Q optical microcavities have shown great potential in sensing applications due to the strongly enhanced light-matter interaction therein. The conventional sensing mechanism, however, has to rely on the reactive interaction. The reactive sensing is limited by the polarizability of the particle, and will fail its sensing function when the real part of the polarizability approaches zero. In the publication, the authors point out that the dissipative interaction opens a channel of the cavity mode decay and results in the resonance linewidth change, which forms an effective sensing scheme even when the real part of analyte polarizability approaches zero, because the signal magnitude is determined by the absorption loss and side scattering of the particle. In the experiment, detection of single gold nanorodsis used to assess the sensing performance. “The gold nanorod of the size of 40 nm × 16 nm is a perfect candidate to test the microcavity sensor for two reasons. One is that the polarizability of this nanoparticle can be tuned by varying the probe wavelength. The other is that the surface plasmon resonance of the particle of this dimension coincides with one of our probe wavelengths in the experiment, at which the real part of the polarizability become zero, most likely invalidating the reactive sensing method, but strengthening the dissipative one,” says Dr. Yanyan Zhi, post-doctor and one of the co-first authors of this work. The researchers examined experimentally both the reactive and dissipative sensing methods by monitoring the mode shift and the linewidth change of the high-Q cavity resonance, respectively. It was found that the reactive sensing signal cannot be recognized from the noises when the probe wavelength is on plasmonic resonance where the nanorod polarizability approaches zero, while the proposed dissipative sensing method still works well, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. The anticipated detection limit can reach 13 nm × 5 nm, which is about 12 times smaller volume than that can be detected by the reactive sensing method. This dissipative sensing method not only provides a new physical mechanism of microcavity sensing, but also represents a significant step towards practical optical sensors in areas of analytical chemistry, environmental science, and molecular biology. “Practically, it’s ready that both the mode shift and the linewidth change of the cavity mode can be simultaneously measured, and thus the common reactive and the proposed dissipative sensing methods are compatible to each other,” says Xiao. “The combination of those two sensing methods adds new dimensions to what can be measured using each of the two methods alone. The dissipative sensing method using a high-Q microcavityoffers a great platform for the detection of tiny single particles, such as vital virus, particles in the polluted air, loss of particles in the manufacturing process, and other nanoparticles under interest.”


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

The gastroenterology ward at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Hong Kong has undergone a dramatic change under the watchful eyes of gastroenterologist Siew Ng and her colleagues. When Ng started seeing patients there nearly seven years ago, she mainly encountered infectious diseases such as intestinal tuberculosis that ravage the gastrointestinal tract. But today, the ward is overwhelmed by young men and women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a lifelong gastrointestinal condition that can be debilitating if left untreated (see 'Preparing for the burden'). “I can hardly keep up with all the patients I have,” says Ng. “The number of cases is basically exploding. And she has the data to support this statement. Ng also leads the Asia-Pacific Crohn's and Colitis Epidemiology Study (ACCESS), which, for the past five years, has tracked new cases of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis — the two major forms of IBD — across 13 countries in Asia as well as Australia. The incidence of IBD in Hong Kong has grown from just 1 case in a million in 1985 to a little over 30 in every million in 2014 (ref. 1). In countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada, the rate of IBD is much higher, with roughly 200–300 cases per million people. In fact, for a long time after IBD was first reported in the United Kingdom in the mid-1800s, it was thought of as a disease of European ancestry. But with the condition now appearing all around the world, the consensus is that anyone can get IBD. “IBD really is a global disease now,” says Ashwin Ananthakrishnan, an epidemiologist and clinician at the Massachusetts General Hospital Crohn's and Colitis Center in Boston. “If you look at the sheer number of patients, there are probably more in India and China than in North America.” The continuing surge in cases is providing research opportunities for clinicians such as Ng. Like other immune-related disorders such as multiple sclerosis and psoriasis, the incidence of IBD has risen in parallel with industrialization and urbanization, but the environmental drivers of IBD are not well understood. As people flock to cities, they have access to better health care and sanitation, but they are also exposed to poorer air quality, and are more likely to have sedentary, largely indoor lifestyles and to consume convenience diets that are high in saturated fat. Studies have linked factors such as these with IBD, but it is difficult to determine the origin in regions that have a long history of the disease. The ideal time to tease apart the complex web of environmental triggers and genetic associations, says Ng, is as urbanization is happening and before the incidence of IBD has peaked. The extent of environmental change may correlate with IBD's rise and characteristics, and could lead to new hypotheses about the causes. “The golden time for finding the cause of the disease is the next ten years,” says Ng. More than 200 genetic variants have been associated with IBD. In the first genetic-association study of IBD to include multiple ethnic groups — Europeans, East Asians, Indians and Iranians — 38 new loci (regions of the genome) with links to IBD were uncovered, 25 of which have previously been associated with other diseases or traits, such as multiple sclerosis or levels of cholesterol2. But the rise of IBD in Asia is not being driven by the emergence of new mutations — genetic changes occur over a much longer timescale than the global onset of IBD has taken. That does not mean, however, that genetics has nothing to offer in the quest to understand the increase of incidence in Asia. Genetic variants could provide clues to why environmental changes have greater impacts on some populations than on others, says Ananthakrishnan. Punjab state in northern India, for instance, has one of the highest incidences of ulcerative colitis in Asia — around 6 new cases in 100,000 people per year3. And the incidence of IBD in people of Indian descent who live in Malaysia is six times higher than that in indigenous Malaysians, and three times higher than that in those of Chinese descent4; clearly, some genetic risk factor is at play. Not all the genes or variants present the same risk across the globe. For example, the ATG16L1 gene — involved in the cellular recycling process autophagy — is associated with risk of Crohn's in white populations, but is not implicated in IBD in Asian people. And NOD2, a risk gene in individuals of European ancestry that is also connected with more aggressive forms of the disease, harbours different IBD-linked variants in Asian populations. What's more, the degree to which these genes explain the disease varies between different populations. In Asia, only 3% of people with IBD have a close relative with the disease, compared with 15% of individuals in the West5. As well as overall risk, certain gene variants may also correlate with particular presentations of IBD, Ananthakrishnan says. His work, which focuses on the environmental and genetic factors associated with IBD, suggests that an Indian person living in the West, for example, will have a type of Crohn's that is more similar to that seen in India than to cases in the West. Genetic and microbial data from different populations can also be used to help tailor treatments for people with IBD, says Jae Hee Cheon at Yonsei University College of Medicine in Seoul, who has conducted genetic, microbiome and epidemiological research in Koreans with IBD. For instance, the microbiota pills in development, which researchers hope to use to replace a pathogenic gut bacterial community with a healthy one, will not necessarily work for patients across the globe because patient populations vary in their disease features and response to treatment, he says. And finding the relevant genetic variants in smaller Asian countries is difficult, partly because the disease is still relatively rare. In Malaysia, for example, only about 2,000–3,000 people are thought to have IBD. That makes genome-wide association studies, which need many thousands of cases, nigh on impossible. The next best option for researchers is to pick handfuls of genetic variants identified as risk factors in larger studies, such as those done in the West, and test to see whether these variants pose a risk in smaller groups, says gastroenterologist Ida Hilmi at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur. Risk factors One of the biggest questions Ananthakrishnan fields from people with IBD is how they can prevent their children from developing the disease. “It's a question that all of us working in the environmental-influence space want to answer,” he says. But at the moment, he can offer only a few general recommendations: avoid passive smoking, minimize antibiotic exposure in the early years and avoid giving children non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which can irritate the gut. For the most part, however, studies have shown these to be only risk factors, rather than proven interventions. Work to unpick the environmental factors behind IBD has a long way to go. Some of the clearest evidence for the role of the environment in IBD comes from studies of immigrants. For example, a large study of residents in Ontario, Canada, showed that South Asian immigrants have an incidence rate of roughly 70 new cases of IBD per million people per year6. Although that is still considerably lower than the annual rate for long-term residents of 240 per million, children of South Asian immigrants have an annual incidence rate that is nearly the same (60 per million) as the children of long-term residents (72 per million). One of the biggest surprises in this study was that the age at which immigrants arrive in Canada is a strong predictive factor for developing IBD, says paediatric gastroenterologist Eric Benchimol of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute in Ottawa, who led the study. For every decade older the person is when they arrive, the risk of IBD decreases by nearly 10%. This implies that there are factors in the new environment that, for certain genetic variations, increase the risk of IBD. Researchers suspect that the likeliest way the environment increases risk is by altering a person's gut bacteria. The main line of thought is that environmental triggers have a greater influence early in life, as the immune system and a full complement of gut bacteria develop and mature. “That's where the excitement is,” says Benchimol. Several large studies are under way in the United States and Canada to investigate the theory. In 2015, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia showed that inflammation, antibiotic exposure and changes to diet independently alter the balance of gut microbes in children with Crohn's disease7. Treatment with a biological drug to decrease inflammation or dietary approaches seemed to normalize the composition of the microbiota. The ongoing Canadian Children Inflammatory Bowel Disease Network's CIDsCaNN study is collecting data from children with a new IBD diagnosis and following them for 18 months, including those with a South Asian background. Researchers are collecting stool samples to investigate the make-up of the microbiota, as well as recording information about early-life environmental risk factors, to try to understand what is triggering the disease. And a team at the University of Toronto in Canada is running a study called GEMINI (Generational Differences in Environmental Exposures caused by Migration: Impact on Incidence of Inflammatory Disease), to investigate risk factors in healthy first- and second-generation South Asian immigrants for IBD and other autoimmune diseases (such as type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis). Canada is the perfect place to conduct these studies, partly because its national-health registries make it easy to identify and track those with the disease, Benchimol says. Prospective studies such as CIDsCaNN, which follow individuals over time, are crucial for understanding the environmental factors that contribute to IBD. Ananthakrishnan is analysing data gathered through the Nurses' Health Study, a longitudinal study of more than 100,000 US women who have completed medical history and lifestyle questionnaires for decades. He found that women who ate high levels of fibre — about 24 grams per day — in the form of fruits and vegetables, were 40% less likely to get Crohn's disease than women who ate around half that8. Other studies have found similar trends for ulcerative colitis. High fibre intake has also been shown to prevent relapse in people with IBD, and animal models of IBD support the role of fibre in reducing the inflammatory damage wrought by the disease. Taken together, the move from a high-fibre diet towards a low-fibre Western diet, which seems to be happening in Asian cities in particular, might be part of the reason for the rise in IBD, Ananthakrishnan says. One limitation to applying findings from Western studies, such as the Nurses' Health Study, to what is happening in Asia is that participants are mainly of European ancestry. Although some factors, such as breastfeeding, seem to be universally protective, other environmental factors do not always carry the same weight across different ethnicities. Smoking, for instance, is one of the strongest risk factors for Crohn's disease in Western populations, but this was not the case for Asian participants in Ng's ACCESS cohort. ACCESS data also seem to suggest that antibiotic use — thought to be a risk factor in the West — is protective against IBD in Asian populations. But it can be more difficult to decipher relationships between antibiotic use and IBD in Asia, because the drugs can be bought over the counter in some countries, making it difficult to accurately record their use. To get to the heart of why the incidence of IBD in Asia is on the rise, rigorous studies based in the continent are needed. Ananthakrishnan thinks that the data sets gathered in the West are excellent models for understanding how environmental risk factors affect chronic disease. Researchers can use these both to narrow the scope of the exposure data and determine when and how often data are collected in Asian epidemiological studies of IBD, says gastroenterologist and epidemiologist Gilaad Kaplan of the University of Calgary in Canada. Ng and her collaborators are pursuing several lines of research as the incidence in Asia swells and their golden window of opportunity to identify the triggers begins to diminish. She is planning to compare the urban and rural populations of China, which are ethnically similar, but starkly different in their environmental exposures — from their dietary choices to whether they use flush toilets. Targeting areas in China that have a low incidence of IBD, such as Xiangshan County in Zhejiang and Chengdu, may help to uncover genetic and environmental factors that protect some individuals from the disease. Much research needs to be done, Ng says. “Every day, I go to work and I see new cases being referred, and I ask my colleague, 'Why has this disease dropped from the sky, out of nowhere? Where did it come from?” Researchers know that the best chance to find out is now.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Opening Ceremony was held at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse. Addressing the Opening ceremony, Peking University President Professor Lin Jianhua said, “For universities in the Chinese mainland, we have a commitment to take on the responsibility for the society, the nation and the world. Peking University has inherited and has been diligently following this tradition. On the one hand, we teach students to bear social responsibility during their studies and after graduation. On the other hand, the Universities have to bear their responsibility for the community, the region, and the nation, during their course of development and advancement.” Professor Lin added, “This is a difficult mission, and it calls for concerted efforts of higher education leaders.” Speaking at the Opening Ceremony, PolyU President Professor Timothy W. Tong said, “Over the last few decades, global challenges such as economic development, environmental protection and technological innovation have driven universities worldwide to redefine their roles and responsibilities beyond traditional education and research in order to bolster their impact on society. Consequently, social responsibility has become a subject high on the agenda.” Professor Tong added, “The USR Network member universities sharing the same vision of making our world increasingly just, inclusive, peaceful and sustainable. With an emphasis on collaboration among members and with other networks and alliances, the Network has vigorously promoted USR by organizing a number of projects including this University Social Responsibility Summit.” This year, the Summit has brought together more than 50 speakers who are higher education leaders and scholars from over 10 countries and regions. They exchanged views at three Presidents’ Roundtable sessions respectively themed “Social Responsibility: A Core Mission of Universities in 21st Century?”, “USR: Translating Vision into Action and Impact”, and “USR in Asia: Challenges and Opportunities”. Plenary sessions held tomorrow (5 November) will include “Community Engagement in Higher Education: Policy and Practice”, “Nurturing Future Leaders through Service-Learning: Strategies and Learning Outcomes” and “Building Disaster Response Capacity – University Students as Community First Responders”. This is the first time that the Summit has a separate Student Forum on 4 November at Peking University campus. The Forum attracted more than 100 students, many of them are delegates from the USR Network member universities. In addition, there will be a student presentation tomorrow. Four teams of students from PolyU, PekingU, Sichuan University and Beijing Normal University conducted presentations to share the views and practical experience of USR from the students’ perspective. Their presence and contribution at the Summit are evidence of the USR Network’s commitment to engaging the university community to address world challenges and shape a better future. The second Executive Committee meeting of the USR Network was held yesterday (3 November) to discuss the strategies and work for the coming year. With two new members, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil and University of Pretoria, South Africa, the USR Network now include the following 14 universities (in alphabetical order of their country): Australia | University of New South Wales Brazil | University of Sao Paulo Hong Kong, P.R.C. | The Hong Kong Polytechnic University Israel | University of Haifa Japan | Kyoto University Korea | Yonsei University P.R.C. | Peking University P.R.C. | Beijing Normal University P.R.C. | Sichuan University P.R.C. | South Africa University of Pretoria U.K. | Clare Hall, University of Cambridge U.K. | The University of Manchester U.S.A. | Tufts University U.S.A. | Washington University in St. Louis For details of the USR Network, please visit http://www.usrnetwork.org.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Torrance dentists at Blue Sky Family Dental are now offering orthodontic treatment options with braces and Invisalign. Properly aligned teeth are important for clear speech, comfortable eating, and proper oral aesthetics. Proper orthodontic treatment can ensure the bite is well-balanced and the teeth are aligned. Braces are the traditional orthodontic treatment. Most patients recognize them as metal brackets and wires, but modern braces have come a long way from the bulky braces of the past with sleeker, more comfortable components. Invisalign is a more technologically advanced option, but works using many of the same principals of braces. Instead of metal wires, Invisalign uses clear aligners that apply pressure to certain points to move teeth. Both treatments can be used to treat: “The high-end technology that is available today enables me to give you an amazing, healthy smile,” said Dr. Mondavi. “Because my staff and I are trained yearly on the newest, most advanced procedures, I’m able to exceed patients’ expectations.” Along with orthodontic treatments, Dr. Mondavi and the team at Blue Sky Family Dental offer restorative dentistry, crowns and bridges, inlays and onlays, dental implants, dentures, bruxism and athletic mouth guards, root canals, pediatric dental care, dental veneers, and smile makeovers. Dr. Robert Mondavi is a graduate of the University of the Pacific in San Francisco. He continues to take advanced courses to advance his knowledge, including advanced cosmetic dentistry training and advanced implant training. Dr. Augustine Kim graduated from UCLA before attending USC’s School of Dentistry. During his time there, he was recognized for his academic accomplishments. He then completed his residency in orthodontics at Tufts University in Boston and an internship at Yonsei University Orthodontic Department in Seoul, South Korea. He is a member of the California Association of Orthodontists and the American Association of Orthodontists. He is board-eligible and in the process of becoming a diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics. Dr. Homan Hanasab is a periodontist who offers comprehensive periodontal care including crown lengthening, dental implants, sinus lifts, gum grafting, socket preservation, ridge expansion, and other gum disease treatments.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

FAIRPORT, NY, November 03, 2016-- William Y. Chey, MD, DSc, has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.With more than 50 years of experience as a physician, educator and research scientist in gastrointestinal medicine, Dr. Chey is widely recognized for his expertise in the field of gastroenterology and hepatology. Prior to his retirement in 2000, he served as a professor of medicine and director of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Rochester Medical Center, and as a consultant gastroenterologist at Canandaigua VA Medical Center. He is a fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Gastroenterological Association, a member of the AGA Legacy Society, and was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and American Physiological Society, among other medical organizations. In addition, he is the former president of the American Pancreatic Association and the American Society of Acupuncture. He was invited nationally and internationally as a visiting professor by numerous prestigious institutions in the United States, Europe, Asia and Mid-Eastern countries. In particular, he holds the titles of Honorary Professor at the Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea and Visiting Professor at Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China and Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.After completing his medical education in 1953 through the two top medical schools in Seoul, Korea, Seoul National University and Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea, and serving as a medical officer of the Republic of Korea in the Korean War, Dr. Chey emigrated to the United States in 1954 and had his post-graduate training including internship and residency in internal medicine at City Hospital of New York, fellowship in pathology at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, and fellowship in hepatology at Jersey City Medical Center, Seton Hall University School of Medicine and Dentistry, Jersey City, NJ. Then he received advanced degrees of Master of Science in Gastroenterology in 1962 and Doctor of Science in Medicine in 1966 from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. At Temple University Medical Center and the Samuel S. Fel's Research Institute, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, he finished a fellowship in gastroenterology and became a faculty member in 1963. He was an Associate Professor of Medicine and Head of Gastrointestinal Research in 1971 when he was recruited by the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY. He was the Founding Director of the Isaac Gordon Center for Digestive Diseases and Nutrition at the Genesee Hospital and Attending Physician at Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, NY. In 1992, he became Director of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He was also the Founding Director of the William and Sheila Konar Center for Digestive and Liver Diseases at Strong Memorial Hospital until his retirement in 2000. During his tenure, he trained numerous clinical and research fellows from the United States and abroad, including Asia, Europe, South America, Mid-East and Africa. The majority of them returned to their native countries and are active in their leadership positions. During the following ten years, he enjoyed practicing gastrointestinal medicine at the Rochester Institute for Digestive Diseases and Sciences and was also actively involved in the American Gastroenterological Association and the American Pancreatic Association. He has been married to Fan K. Tang since 1959. They have 4 children; William D. married to Janine Zwiren, Donna married to Dale Hoellrich, Richard married to Maura Bauman, and Laura married to Richard Warren, and 9 grandchildren; Cameron, Brandon (deceased), Samuel, Megen, Russell, Paris, Wyatt, Josephine and LiLi.He contributed numerous articles to competitive scientific journals, and published many chapters in text-books and two books of his specialty and research. He was a member of the editorial board of the Pancreas and American Journal of Physiology, and has been the Editor-In-Chief of Clinical Endoscopy since 2011. He served as an active member of the National Institute of Health, Surgery and Bioengineering Study Section and a consultant to the Gastrointestinal Drug Advisory Committee, Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services.In recognition of his contributions to medicine, Dr. Chey received a wide variety of honors and awards. He was the recipient of the V.L. William and Frisca Go Award for Life Time Achievement from the American Pancreatic Association, the Governor's Award for Excellence in Clinical Research from the American College of Gastroenterology, Distinguished Clinician Award and Mentor's Research Scholar Award from the American Gastroenterological Association, Distinguished Service Award from the Rochester Academy of Medicine and American Top Physicians Award in 2008 from the Consumers' Research Council of America. He has been cited in Marquis Who's Who in America, in Medicine and Health Care, in Science and Engineering, and in the World.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

NEW YORK, NY, February 28, 2017 Yoshiaki Omura has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.With almost five decades of invaluable contributions to his field, Dr. Omura is renowned for his excellence as a medical researcher and educator. He discovered how to detect cancer from an electro-cardiogram and his work is strongly accepted worldwide. Dr. Omura will be a keynote speaker at the World Congress in Baltimore, MD, on February 20-22, 2017. Dr. Omura was also a keynote speaker on February 8, 2017 at European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium on non-invasive early diagnosis of cancer.Best recognized as the creator of the US patented non-invasive, early diagnostic method of cancer & cardiovascular diseases "Bi-Digital O-Ring Test", Dr. Omura parlays his expertise into roles at New York Medical College, where he is an adjunct professor of family and community medicine. Until 2 years ago, he has been affiliated with the Heart Disease Research Foundation, where he has been the director of medical research since 1972, the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, where he has been a member of the alumni council since 1986, and the Ukrainian National Medical University, where he has been a professor for more than 10 years in the department of non-orthodox medicine since 1993.Dr. Omura earned an associate degree from Electrical Engineering Dept. of Nihon University, a Bachelor of Science in applied physics from Waseda University, and an MD from Yokohama City University. Upon graduation, Dr. Omura started as a rotating intern at Tokyo University Hospital and subsequently held the same role at Norwalk Hospital in Connecticut. In 1960 he joined Columbia University as a research fellow in cardiovascular surgery, which is the same year he began postgraduate studies in experimental physics. From 1961 until 1965, he worked as a resident physician in oncological surgery at Francis Delafield Hospital, then main cancer institute of Columbia University and towards the end of that role, he earned a Doctor of Science degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University in Pharmaco-electrophysiology of single cardiac cell in vivo & in vitro. Dr. Omura has also worked as a visiting professor at the University of Paris, important research position at INSERM (National Institute of Health of France), visiting professor of Unviersity of Padua, Italy, visiting professor of Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea, visiting professor of Showa University of Tokyo, visiting professor of Chinese Medical School, consultant with the New York Pain Center, and vice chair for the American Board of Forensic Medicine.A diplomate through the International College of Acupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics, the American Academy of Pain Management and the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress, Dr. Omura has contributed his extensive knowledge to a variety of creative works. He is the author of 9 books and has also served on the editorial board of the Scandinavian Journal of Acupuncture and Electrotherapy since 1987, as editor-in-chief of the Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research, International Journal since 1974, and Functional Neurology of Italy from 1988 until 2002. In order to remain abreast of changes in the field, he affiliates himself with the New York Cardiology Society, the American College of Angiology, the American Association of Integrative Medicine, and the life fellow of Royal Society of Medicine of England, as well as many others.A shining example of excellence in his field, Dr. Omura has achieved much throughout his long-standing career, including obtaining seven U.S. and seven Japanese patents in the medical field. In recognition of his efforts, he was named Acupuncture Scientist of the Year through the International Congress of Chinese Medicine in 1989 and earned the World First Qi Gong Scientist of the Year Award through the same organization a year later. Additionally, he has had the honor of being named to Who's Who in American Education, Who's Who in Science and Engineering and Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare. Among the top 100 scientists by International Biographical Institute of Oxford, he was selected.To learn more about Dr. Omura, visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/yoshiaki-omura-m-d-sc-d-42436047 About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Home > Press > Unmasking new drivers of stomach cancer: Study advances understanding of stomach cancer progression and could lead to new therapeutic targets and improved clinical outcomes Abstract: Scientists have uncovered a new class of master control elements in stomach cancer called “super-enhancers”, which control critical cancer genes and proteins required for stomach tumours to survive and grow. The team’s generation of this unprecedented and comprehensive catalogue of stomach cancer super-enhancers is an important milestone for the community. Currently, stomach cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of global cancer death[1]. Most gastric cancers are diagnosed late, and the disease is often resistant to current clinical treatments. By studying super-enhancers in stomach tumours, the team was able to shed light on how these elements impact the risk of stomach cancer development and progression of the disease. For example, stomach cancer patients whose tumours exhibited high numbers of super-enhancers exhibited a significantly poorer survival rate. Selective activation of these super-enhancers could explain why certain groups of people are at risk of developing the disease. These tissue-specific super-enhancers also represent a previously untapped reservoir of cancer vulnerability, acting to bridge oncogenic signalling to tissue-specific features of malignancy. Thus, studying the mechanisms driving the development of super-enhancers in stomach cancer may lead to novel therapies. Specifically, the team also identified two DNA-binding proteins as drivers for the formation of tumour-specific super-enhancers. These may serve as potential drug targets for stomach cancer. The researchers were able to make this finding using a highly sensitive, “made-in-Singapore” technology, called Nano-ChIPseq. Developed at A*STAR’s Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), Nano-ChIPseq enables the study of epigenomic changes in clinical samples obtained directly from stomach cancer patients, rather than laboratory cultured cell lines. Unlike DNA which is stable and unchanging, epigenomic instructions are strongly influenced by factors such as food, infectious agents, and chemicals, suggesting that they can be modified by environmental risk factors. The team is now working to commercialise the technology and develop data technologies, which will enable scientists to revolutionise cancer therapeutics. “Future work in our lab will investigate how such super-enhancers can be disrupted by drugs, which will open up new avenues for cancer therapy,” said the study’s corresponding author Prof Patrick Tan, Deputy Executive Director of A*STAR’s Biomedical Research Council and an associate faculty member at the GIS. “We hope that our findings will encourage the scientific community to embrace our technology as a means to rapidly uncover master control elements that are highly relevant to diseases and clinical outcomes. This effort may eventually change the way stomach and other cancers are managed, which will enhance the clinical outcomes of cancer patients.” Published in scientific journal Nature Communications, this study was led by GIS, in collaboration with Duke-NUS Medical School, Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore (NUS), Singapore General Hospital (SGH), Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine at Oxford University, and the Singapore Gastric Cancer Consortium (SGCC). Commercialisation of the Nano-ChIPseq platform is currently supported through gap funding awarded by ETPL Pte Ltd, the commercialisation arm of A*STAR. "I felt something awesome will be coming when I heard about the new method, Nano-ChIPseq. The study suggests that extensive alterations in gene regulation, and not genes themselves, explain deep mysteries of gastric cancer, which are known to exhibit small numbers of mutations and deep involvement of bacterial infection, an environmental factor. Naturally, development of novel therapeutic strategies must take account of these findings," said Dr Toshikazu Ushijima, Chief of Division of Epigenomics at the National Cancer Center Research Institute in Japan, and a member of the SGCC Scientific Advisory Board. GIS Executive Director Prof Ng Huck Hui added, “This is a remarkable technological breakthrough for the community. As we constantly work to find better treatments for cancer, it is also important that we find more efficient ways to study how epigenomic changes can drive the formation of cancerous cells from healthy cells. A greater understanding about molecular changes in diseases can potentially lead to early therapeutic intervention and improved care for the patients. 1Cancer Therapeutics and Stratified Oncology, Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, Genome #02-01, Singapore 138672, Singapore. 2Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8 College Road, Singapore 169857, Singapore. 3NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074, Singapore. 4Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 14 Medical Drive, #12-01, Singapore 117599, Singapore. 5Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 2 Medical Drive #04-01, Singapore 117597, Singapore. 6Department of Human Genetics, Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, Genome #02-01, Singapore 138672, Singapore. 7Medical Research Council (MRC) Molecular Haematology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 9DS, UK. 8Department of Upper Gastrointestinal & Bariatric Surgery, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore 169608, Singapore. 9Division of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore, 11 Hospital Drive, Singapore 169610, Singapore. 10Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore 169608, Singapore. 11Department of Medical Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, South Korea. 12SingHealth/Duke-NUS Institute of Precision Medicine, National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore 168752, Singapore. 13Laboratory of Cancer Epigenome, Department of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre, 11 Hospital Drive, Singapore 169610, Singapore. 14School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637551, Singapore. 15Cellular and Molecular Research, National Cancer Centre, 11 Hospital Drive, Singapore 169610, Singapore. *These authors contributed equally to this work. About Genome Institute of Singapore, A*STAR The Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) is an institute of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). It has a global vision that seeks to use genomic sciences to achieve extraordinary improvements in human health and public prosperity. Established in 2000 as a centre for genomic discovery, the GIS will pursue the integration of technology, genetics and biology towards academic, economic and societal impact. The key research areas at the GIS include Human Genetics, Infectious Diseases, Cancer Therapeutics and Stratified Oncology, Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Cancer Stem Cell Biology, Computational and Systems Biology, and Translational Research. The genomics infrastructure at the GIS is utilised to train new scientific talent, to function as a bridge for academic and industrial research, and to explore scientific questions of high impact. For more information about GIS, please visit www.gis.a-star.edu.sg About the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) ​ The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) is Singapore's lead public sector agency that spearheads economic oriented research to advance scientific discovery and develop innovative technology. Through open innovation, we collaborate with our partners in both the public and private sectors to benefit society. As a Science and Technology Organisation, A*STAR bridges the gap between academia and industry. Our research creates economic growth and jobs for Singapore, and enhances lives by contributing to societal benefits such as improving outcomes in healthcare, urban living, and sustainability. We play a key role in nurturing and developing a diversity of talent and leaders in our Agency and Research Institutes, the wider research community and industry. A*STAR oversees 18 biomedical sciences and physical sciences and engineering research entities primarily located in Biopolis and Fusionopolis. For more information on A*STAR, please visit www.a-star.edu.sgFor more information about GIS, please visit www.gis.a-star.edu.sg For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | April 11, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Home > Press > Penn engineers develop first transistors made entirely of nanocrystal 'inks Abstract: The transistor is the most fundamental building block of electronics, used to build circuits capable of amplifying electrical signals or switching them between the 0s and 1s at the heart of digital computation. Transistor fabrication is a highly complex process, however, requiring high-temperature, high-vacuum equipment. Now, University of Pennsylvania engineers have shown a new approach for making these devices: sequentially depositing their components in the form of liquid nanocrystal "inks." Their new study, published in Science, opens the door for electrical components to be built into flexible or wearable applications, as the lower-temperature process is compatible with a wide array of materials and can be applied to larger areas. The researchers' nanocrystal-based field effect transistors were patterned onto flexible plastic backings using spin coating but could eventually be constructed by additive manufacturing systems, like 3-D printers. The study was lead by Cherie Kagan, the Stephen J. Angello Professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Ji-Hyuk Choi, then a member of her lab, now a senior researcher at the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources. Han Wang, Soong Ju Oh, Taejong Paik and Pil Sung Jo of the Kagan lab contributed to the work. They collaborated with Christopher Murray, a Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor with appointments in the School of Arts & Sciences and Penn Engineering; Murray lab members Xingchen Ye and Benjamin Diroll; and Jinwoo Sung of Korea's Yonsei University. The researchers began by taking nanocrystals, or roughly spherical nanoscale particles, with the electrical qualities necessary for a transistor and dispersing these particles in a liquid, making nanocrystal inks. Kagan's group developed a library of four of these inks: a conductor (silver), an insulator (aluminum oxide), a semiconductor (cadmium selenide) and a conductor combined with a dopant (a mixture of silver and indium). "Doping" the semiconductor layer of the transistor with impurities controls whether the device transmits a positive or negative charge. "These materials are colloids just like the ink in your inkjet printer," Kagan said, "but you can get all the characteristics that you want and expect from the analogous bulk materials, such as whether they're conductors, semiconductors or insulators. "Our question was whether you could lay them down on a surface in such a way that they work together to form functional transistors." The electrical properties of several of these nanocrystal inks had been independently verified, but they had never been combined into full devices. "This is the first work," Choi said, "showing that all the components, the metallic, insulating, and semiconducting layers of the transistors, and even the doping of the semiconductor could be made from nanocrystals." Such a process entails layering or mixing them in precise patterns. First, the conductive silver nanocrystal ink was deposited from liquid on a flexible plastic surface that was treated with a photolithographic mask, then rapidly spun to draw it out in an even layer. The mask was then removed to leave the silver ink in the shape of the transistor's gate electrode. The researchers followed that layer by spin-coating a layer of the aluminum oxide nanocrystal-based insulator, then a layer of the cadmium selenide nanocrystal-based semiconductor and finally another masked layer for the indium/silver mixture, which forms the transistor's source and drain electrodes. Upon heating at relatively low temperatures, the indium dopant diffused from those electrodes into the semiconductor component. "The trick with working with solution-based materials is making sure that, when you add the second layer, it doesn't wash off the first, and so on," Kagan said. "We had to treat the surfaces of the nanocrystals, both when they're first in solution and after they're deposited, to make sure they have the right electrical properties and that they stick together in the configuration we want." Because this entirely ink-based fabrication process works at lower temperatures than existing vacuum-based methods, the researchers were able to make several transistors on the same flexible plastic backing at the same time. "Making transistors over larger areas and at lower temperatures have been goals for an emerging class of technologies, when people think of the Internet of things, large area flexible electronics and wearable devices," Kagan said. "We haven't developed all of the necessary aspects so they could be printed yet, but because these materials are all solution-based, it demonstrates the promise of this materials class and sets the stage for additive manufacturing." ### The research was supported primarily by the National Science Foundation through its Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers Award DMR-1120901 and its Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems Award CBET-1236406; the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering Award DE-SC0002158; and the Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative Award ONR-N00014-10-1-0942. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Dublin, Dec. 20, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "HDAC Inhibitors Market, 2016 - 2026" report to their offering. The HDAC Inhibitors Market, 2016-2026 report was commissioned to examine the current landscape and the future outlook of the growing pipeline of products in this area. HDACs have been studied in cellular processes such as apoptosis, autophagy, metabolism, DNA damage repair, cell cycle control and senescence. Altered expression of HDACs has been observed in different tumors; this makes them a potential target for treatment of cancer and other genetic or epigenetic related disorders. Inhibition of HDACs has shown positive results in disruption of multiple cell signaling pathways and prevention of tumor growth. The study provides a detailed market forecast and opportunity analysis for the time period 2016-2026. The research, analysis and insights presented in this report include potential sales of the approved drugs and the ones in late stages of development (phase III and phase II). To add robustness to our model, we have provided three scenarios for our market forecast; these include the conservative, base and optimistic scenarios. Our opinions and insights, presented in this study were influenced by several discussions we conducted with experts in this area. All actual figures have been sourced and analyzed from publicly available information forums and primary research discussions. Financial figures mentioned in this report are in USD, unless otherwise specified. Example Highlights - Nearly 90 HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical / preclinical stages of development; the clinical molecules account for over 30% of the pipeline while over 60% is captured by molecules in the preclinical / discovery stage. - With 66% of the pipeline molecules targeting oncological indications, cancer remains one of the most widely studied field for HDAC inhibitors. Within oncology, hematological malignancies such as PTCL and CTCL are popular targets; three HDAC inhibitors (Zolinza, ISTODAX® and BELEODAQ®) are approved for these indications. Other therapeutic areas such as autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, inflammatory disorders, neurological disorders, are also gradually gaining traction. - Although the market was initially led by the large-size pharma players (such as Celgene, Merck, Novartis), the current market is characterized by the presence of several small / mid-sized pharma players. Notable examples of the small and mid-sized firms include 4SC, Chroma Therapeutics, CrystalGenomics, Curis, Evgen Pharma, FORUM Pharmaceuticals, Karus Therapeutics, Mirati Therapeutics, MEI Pharma, Shenzhen Chipscreen Biosciences, Syndax Pharmaceuticals and TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals. - In addition, there are several non-industry institutes and universities that are primarily carrying out preclinical research. Examples of these include Harvard Medical School (BG45), Imperial College London (C1A), Kyoto University (Jd, Sd), National Taiwan University (Quinazolin-4-one derivatives), Taipei Medical University (MPT0E028), University of Messina (MC-1575, MC-1568). - Four of the five approved drugs are pan-HDAC inhibitors targeting HDAC isoforms non-specifically. However, in the past few years, several class selective HDAC inhibitors have entered the clinic; these are associated with a higher efficacy and result in decreased toxicity from the treatment. Of the total HDAC inhibitors identified, 52% of the molecules are class specific; of these, 33% molecules target Class I specific isoforms and the rest target Class II specific isoforms of HDACs. Notable examples of molecules targeting class-specific HDACs includeentinostat (phase III), resminostat (phase II), SHP-141 (phase II), mocetinostat (phase II), CHR-3996 (phase I/II) and ricolinostat (phase I/II). - The HDAC inhibitors market is expected to grow at a healthy annual rate of 32% over the next decade.With multiple potential target indications, Istodax® is expected to capture the largest market share (close to 21%) in 2026, followed by entinostat, Farydak® and Beleodaq®. Key Topics Covered: 1. Preface 1.1. Scope Of The Report 1.2. Research Methodology 1.3. Chapter Outlines 2. Executive Summary 3. Introduction 3.1. The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology and Cell Cycle 3.2. DNA: Structure and Functions 3.3. Fundamentals of Epigenetics 3.3.1. Effect of Histone Modification on DNA Based Processes 3.3.2. Chromatin Structure Modification and its Enzymes 3.4. Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) 3.4.1. Classification of HDACs 3.4.2. Role of HDACs and HDAC Inhibitors in Cellular Processes 3.5. HDAC Inhibitors 3.5.1. Structure and Classification 3.5.2. Different Types of HDAC Inhibitors 3.5.3. Therapeutic Applications of HDAC Inhibitors 4. HDAC Inhibitors: Market Landscape 4.1. Chapter Overview 4.2. Development Pipeline of HDAC Inhibitors 4.3. Distribution by Phase of Development 4.4. Distribution by Therapeutic Area 4.5. Distribution by Class Specificity 4.6. Distribution by Type of Developer 4.7. Distribution by Geography 4.8. Active Industry Players 5. Drug Profiles: Marketed And Late-Stage HDAC Inhibitors 5.1. Chapter Overview 5.2. Company and Drug Profiles: Marketed and Phase III Molecules 5.2.1. Celgene Corporation 5.2.3. Novartis 5.2.4. Shenzhen Chipscreen Biosciences 5.2.5. Syndax Pharmaceuticals 5.3. Drug Profiles: Phase II Molecules 5.3.1. Abexinostat (PCI-24781) 5.3.2. CUDC-907 5.3.3. FRM-0334 (EVP-0334) 5.3.4. Givinostat (ITF2357) 5.3.5. Mocetinostat (MGCD103) 5.3.6. Pracinostat (SB939) 5.3.7. Resminostat (4SC-201) 5.3.8. SFX-01 5.3.9. SHAPE (SHP-141) 5.3.10. Tefinostat (CHR-2845) 6. Key Insights: Therapeutic Area, Class Specificity, Clinical Endpoints 6.1. Clinical Development Analysis: Class Specificity and Therapeutic Areas 6.2. Clinical Development Analysis: Developer Landscape 6.3. Clinical Development Analysis: Trial Endpoint Comparison 7. Market Forecast And Opportunity Analysis 7.1. Chapter Overview 7.2. Scope and Limitations 7.3. Forecast Methodology 7.4. Overall HDAC Inhibitors Market 7.5. HDAC Inhibitors Market: Individual Forecasts 7.5.1. Zolinza (Merck) 7.5.2. Istodax® (Celgene Corporation) 7.5.3. Beleodaq® (Onxeo) 7.5.4. Farydak® (Novartis) 7.5.5. Epidaza® (Shenzhen Chipscreen Biosciences) 7.5.6. Entinostat (Syndax Pharmaceuticals) 7.5.7. Abexinostat (Pharmacyclics) 7.5.8. CUDC-907 (Curis) 7.5.9. FRM-0334 (FORUM Pharmaceuticals) 7.5.10. Mocetinostat (Mirati Therapeutics) 7.5.11. Pracinostat (MEI Pharma) 7.5.12. Resminostat (4SC, Menarini, Yakult Honsha) 7.5.13. SFX-01 (Evgen Pharma) 7.5.14. SHP-141 (TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals) 7.5.15. Tefinostat (Chroma Therapeutics) 8. Publication Analysis 8.1. Chapter Overview 8.2. HDAC Inhibitors: Publications 8.3. Publication Analysis: Quarterly Distribution 8.4. Publication Analysis: Distribution by HDAC Inhibitor Class 8.5. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Drugs Studied 8.6. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Therapeutic Area 8.7. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Journals 8.8. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Phase of Development 8.9. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Type of Therapy 9. Social Media: Emerging Trends 9.1. Chapter Overview 9.1.1. Trends on Twitter 9.1.2. Trends on Facebook 10. Conclusion 10.1. The Pipeline is Healthy with Several Molecules in Preclinical Stages of Development 10.2. HDAC Inhibitors Cater to a Wide Spectrum of Disease Areas 10.3. Class Specific HDAC Inhibitors Have Been Explored for a More Targeted Approach 10.4. The Interest is Gradually Rising Amongst Both Industry and Non-Industry Players 10.5. Supported by a Robust Preclinical Pipeline, HDAC Inhibitors are Expected to Emerge as A Multi-Billion Dollar Market 11. Interview Transcripts 11.1. Chapter Overview 11.2. Dr. Simon Kerry, CEO, Karus Therapeutics 11.3. Dr. James Christensen, CSO and Senior VP, Mirati Therapeutics 11.4. Dr. Hyung J. Chun, MD, FAHA, Associate Professor of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine 12. Appendix 1: Tabulated Data 13. Appendix 2: List Of Companies And Organizations Companies Mentioned - 4SC - AACR - AbbVie - Acceleron Pharma - Acetylon Pharmaceuticals - Active Biotech - Agios Pharmaceuticals - ASH - Arno Therapeutics - Astellas Pharma - Bayer Schering Pharma - Baylor College of Medicine - BioMarin - Bionor Immuno - bluebird bio - Case Comprehensive Cancer Center - Celera Genomics - Celgene - Celleron Therapeutics - Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie - CETYA Therapeutics - CHDI Foundation - Chipscreen Biosciences - Chong Kun Dang Pharmaceutical - Chroma Therapeutics - Croix-Rousse Hospital - CrystalGenomics - Curis - DAC - Diaxonhit - DNA Therapeutics - Duke University - ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group - Eddingpharm - Eisai - Epizyme - Errant Gene Therapeutics - European Calcified Tissue Society - Evgen Pharma - FORMA Therapeutics - FORUM Pharmaceuticals - Fudan University - Genentech - Genextra - Gilead - Gloucester Pharmaceuticals - GNT Biotech - GSK - Harvard Medical School - Henan Cancer Hospital - HUYA Biosciences - Ikerchem - Imperial College London - In2Gen - International Bone and Mineral Society - Israel Cancer Association and Bar Ilan University - Italfarmaco - Johnson and Johnson - Kalypsys - Karus Therapeutics - King's College, University of London - Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine - Kyoto University - Kyowa Hakko Kirin - Leukemia and Lymphoma Society - Lymphoma Academic Research Organization - Massachusetts General Hospital - Mayo Clinic - MedImmune - MEI Pharma - Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center - Menarini - Merck - MethylGene - Mirati Therapeutics - Morphosys - Mundipharma-EDO - National Brain Research Centre - National Comprehensive Cancer Network - National Taiwan University - NCI - Novartis - NuPotential - Oceanyx Pharma - Oncolys Biopharma - Onxeo - Onyx - Orchid Pharma - Paterson Institute for Cancer Research - Pfizer - Pharmacyclics - Pharmion Corporation - Quimatryx - Quintiles - Repligen - Respiratorius - Roche - Rodin Therapeutics - Royal Veterinary College, University of London - Ruijin Hospital - S*Bio - Sarcoma Alliance for Research through Collaboration - Seattle Genetics - Servier Canada - Shape Pharmaceuticals - Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center - Sigma Tau Pharmaceuticals - Signal Rx - SpeBio - Spectrum Pharmaceuticals - Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research - Sutro Biopharma - Syndax Pharmaceuticals - Synovo GmbH - Taipei Medical University - TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals - University of Liverpool - University of Messina - University of Miami - Vanderbilt University School of Medicine - Ventana Medical Systems - Vilnius University - Yakult Honsha - Yale University - Yonsei University College of Medicine For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/srvj3j/hdac_inhibitors


Patent
Yonsei University and Jiwell Electronics Co. | Date: 2012-04-27

The present invention relates to a jawbone distraction system and control method thereof, including a jawbone extension apparatus, a remote controller and a monitor, the jawbone distractor being configured to allow a horizontal shift of alveolar bone as well as performing vertical jawbone distraction, being precisely controlled in a wireless mode and configured to control a drive of the jawbone distractor through the remote controller while ascertaining a driving state by the monitor. A jawbone distraction system, including a micro-actuator and an actuator controller controlling the micro-actuator, being formed to include a jawbone distractor installed to an upper bone and a lower bone connected to the upper bone and configured to adjust an interval between the upper and lower bones, and a monitor generating and wirelessly transmitting an actuator control signal to the jawbone distractor, is further comprised of: a remote controller including a forward shift key and a reverse shift key that set the micro-actuator to shift each in a forward direction and a reverse direction, in which the monitor is configured to include an arithmetic processor generating an actuator control signal in response to a forward shift key signal and a reverse shift key signal that are received from the remote controller. The actuator controller includes an actuator state detector detecting a voltage of a device serially coupled to the micro-actuator or a current signal of an input node of the micro-actuator as a state detection signal.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.6 | Award Amount: 11.07M | Year: 2012

A federation of experimentation facilities will significantly accelerate Future Internet research. Fed4FIRE will deliver open and easily accessible facilities to the FIRE experimentation communities, which focus on fixed and wireless infrastructures, services and applications, and combinations thereof. The project will develop a demand-driven common federation framework, based on an open architecture and specification. It will be widely adopted by facilities and promoted internationally. This framework will provide simple, efficient, and cost effective experimental processes built around experimenters and facility owners requirements. Insight into technical and socio-economic metrics, and how the introduction of new technologies into Future Internet facilities influences them, will be provided by harmonized and comprehensive measurement techniques. Tools and services supporting dynamic federated identities, access control, and SLA management will increase the trustworthiness of the federation and its facilities. A FIRE portal will offer brokering, user access management and measurements. Professional technical staff will offer first-line and second-line support to make the federation simple to use. The project will use open calls to support innovative experiments from academia and industry and to adapt additional experimentation facilities for compliance with Fed4FIRE specifications. A federation authority will be established to approve facilities and to promote desirable operational policies that simplify federation. A Federation Standardization Task Force will prepare for sustainable standardization beyond the end of the project. The adoption of the Fed4FIRE common federation framework by the FIRE facilities, the widespread usage by both academic and industrial experimenters, and the strong links with other national and international initiatives such as the FI-PPP, will pave the way to sustainability towards Horizon 2020.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.1.1 | Award Amount: 5.05M | Year: 2010

The need for the radio spectrum for the rapidly growing broadband access services is evident. Abundant and fast access to spectrum has three main advantages: it fosters rapid innovation in wireless systems and services lowering entry barrier on the market; it enables affordable mobile broadband access to all; and makes new energy efficient wireless systems possible. Secondary use of already licensed, but poorly inefficiently used spectrum, (Cognitive Radio )has been proposed as a solution to make more efficient use of the spectrum. Low spectrum occupancy in a number of measurement campaigns worldwide has been the basis for claims of large gains in spectrum efficiency by cognitive radio. However, little research has been done to substantiate these claims. The QUASAR project aims at bridging this gap between the claims made in conventional cognitive radio research and practical implementation by assessing and quantifying the real-world benefits of secondary (opportunistic) access to primary (licensed) spectrum. The analysis is based on two key features of cognitive radio: the ability of the secondary users to discover the opportunity to use the spectrum, and assessing the electromagnetic impact of secondary user transmissions on primary system (receivers). Novel approaches are taken as we go beyond the conventional notion of detecting spectrum holes into treating spectrum opportunity discovery as a data fusion problem, as well as new schemes that cope interference from multiple uncoordinated secondary users. QUASAR will provide a comprehensive analysis of the techno-economical environment and provide detailed roadmaps and guidelines on how to apply and analyze new opportunistic spectrum access business models. The project will finally provide specific and reasoned proposals to go beyond the current regulatory framework. A balanced project team will provide results of high scientific quality and strong impact on the regulatory process and wireless business.


Park S.,Yonsei University | Gildersleeve J.C.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Blixt O.,Copenhagen University | Shin I.,Yonsei University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray-based technology has been widely employed for rapid analysis of the glycan binding properties of lectins and antibodies, the quantitative measurements of glycan-protein interactions, detection of cells and pathogens, identification of disease-related anti-glycan antibodies for diagnosis, and fast assessment of substrate specificities of glycosyltransferases. This review covers the construction of carbohydrate microarrays, detection methods of carbohydrate microarrays and their applications in biological and biomedical research. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


The present invention relates to a device for measuring a deformation ratio of a structure and a method of measuring a deformation ratio of a structure using the same. More specifically, the device for measuring a deformation ratio of a structure according to the present invention comprises a photonic crystal layer containing nanoparticles aligned at a certain interval. According to the present invention, when various industrial structures are deformed by a working load, and the like, presence of deformation and the correct deformation ratio in the structures may be simply and easily measured by measuring the change of structural color or magnetic flux in the corresponding part, and this measurement of deformation may also prevent accidents due to excessive deformation in structures.


Ko S.,Yonsei University | Lee J.-I.,Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology | Yang H.S.,Yonsei University | Park S.,Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology | Jeong U.,Yonsei University
Advanced Materials | Year: 2012

Mesoporous CuO particles threaded with carbon nanotubes are suggested as a novel class of nanocomposite material for a high-performance anode in the lithium-ion batteries. The nanocomposite electrode exhibits a highly reversible capacity (650 mA h g-1 at 0.1 C rate) and an excellent C rate capability (580 mA h g-1 at 5 C, and 500 mA h g-1 at 10 C). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Hargrove A.E.,University of Texas at Austin | Nieto S.,University of Zaragoza | Zhang T.,Henkel AG | Sessler J.L.,University of Texas at Austin | And 2 more authors.
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2011

The investigation of synthetic (abiotic) phosphate receptors seeks to provide improved methodologies for the detection, extraction, and transport of biologically, chemically, and environmentally important phosphates. The design of phosphate receptors is complicated by the acid-base properties of phosphate anions. In addition to the more common anion-hydrogen bond donor interactions, protonated phosphate anions can also interact with hydrogen bond acceptors. A variety of recognition interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, van der Waals forces, π-surface interactions, shape complementarity, and metal coordination, have been employed alone or in concert to generate phosphate receptors. Many noncolored receptors have been functionalized with chromophores to produce covalent frameworks that undergo a pronounced color change when treated with an appropriate guest. Indicator displacement assay (IDA) is a competition method for the sensing of analytes.


Kim S.H.,Yonsei University | Saver J.L.,University of California at Los Angeles
Stroke | Year: 2015

Results-Among 595 patients (297 placebo and 298 tPA treated) with documented initial BT, 77.1% had initial BT <37.0°C and 22.9% 37.0°C. Patients with higher initial BT had lower baseline stroke severity in both tPA-treated patients (the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale median, 11 versus 15; P=0.05) and placebo-treated patients (median, 13 versus 16; P<0.01). Patients with higher initial BT also had lower infarction volume on computed tomography at 3 months in both tPA-treated patients (median, 9.6 versus 16.7 cm; P=0.08) and placebo-treated patients (median, 13.1 versus 28.1 cm; P=0.02), but no clinical outcome differences. Analysis of lytic treatment effect found no heterogeneity in the degree of tPA benefit in both higher and lower BT groups (37.0°C: odds ratio for the modified Rankin Scale 0-1 outcome, 2.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-6.21 and <37.0°C: odds ratio, 2.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-3.84; heterogeneity P=0.83).Conclusions-In patients with hyperacute stroke, higher presenting temperatures are associated with less severe neurological deficits and reduced final infarct volumes. Presenting temperature does not modify the benefit of tPA on 3-month favorable outcome.Background and Purpose-Body temperature (BT) is an important physiological factor in acute ischemic stroke. However, the relationship of initial BT to stroke severity and degree of benefit from thrombolytic therapy has been delineated incompletely.Methods-We analyzed the public data set of the 2 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator (tPA) stroke trials, comparing patients with lower (<37.0°C) and higher (37.0°C) presenting BT. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.


Park J.,Yonsei University | Van Der Schaar M.,University of California at Los Angeles
IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications | Year: 2012

This paper develops a game-theoretic framework for the design and analysis of a new class of incentive schemes called intervention schemes. We formulate intervention games, propose a solution concept of intervention equilibrium, and prove its existence in a finite intervention game. We apply our framework to resource sharing scenarios in wireless communications, whose non-cooperative outcomes without intervention yield suboptimal performance. We derive analytical results and analyze illustrative examples in the cases of imperfect and perfect monitoring. In the case of imperfect monitoring, intervention schemes can improve the suboptimal performance of non-cooperative equilibrium when the intervention device has a sufficiently accurate monitoring technology, although it may not be possible to achieve the best feasible performance. In the case of perfect monitoring, the best feasible performance can be obtained with an intervention scheme when the intervention device has a sufficiently strong intervention capability. © 2012 IEEE.


Huang K.,Yonsei University | Zhang R.,Institute for Infocomm Research
IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications | Year: 2012

Multi-antenna precoding effectively mitigates the interference in wireless networks. However, the resultant performance gains can be significantly compromised in practice if the precoder design fails to account for the inaccuracy in the channel state information (CSI) feedback. This paper addresses this issue by considering finite-rate CSI feedback from receivers to their interfering transmitters in the two-user multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) interference channel, called cooperative feedback, and proposing a systematic method for designing transceivers comprising linear precoders and equalizers. Specifically, each precoder/equalizer is decomposed into inner and outer components for nulling the cross-link interference and achieving array gain, respectively. The inner precoders/equalizers are further optimized to suppress the residual interference resulting from finite-rate cooperative feedback. Furthermore, the residual interference is regulated by additional scalar cooperative feedback signals that are designed to control transmission power using different criteria including fixed interference margin and maximum sum throughput. Finally, the required number of cooperative precoder feedback bits is derived for limiting the throughput loss due to precoder quantization. © 2012 IEEE.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2010-11-04

Stable SRAM cells utilizing Independent Gate FinFET architectures provide improvements over conventional SRAM cells in device parameters such as Read Static Noise Margin (RSNM) and Write Noise Margin (WNM). Exemplary SRAM cells comprise a pair of storage nodes, a pair of bit lines, a pair of pull-up devices, a pair of pull-down devices and a pair of pass-gate devices. A first control signal and a second control signal are configured to adjust drive strengths of the pass-gate devices, and a third control signal is configured to adjust drive strengths of the pull-up devices, wherein the first control signal is routed orthogonal to a bit line direction, and the second and third control signals are routed in a direction same as the bit line direction. RSNM and WNM are improved by adjusting drive strengths of the pull-up and pass-gate devices during read and write operations.


Patent
Lsis Co. and Yonsei University | Date: 2014-05-22

The present disclosure provides a method for controlling a multilevel converter, the method including, detecting modulation state values and current directions of sub-modules, and designating, by one sub-module, an average number of switching for each period of an output waveform, wherein the step of designating the average number of switching includes, grouping the sub-modules according to being in ON state or in OFF state, comparing the number of sub-modules in previous ON state and the number of sub-modules in OFF state to obtain a difference therebetween, and changing a state as much as the difference, comparing a sub-module of ON state in charged state and in discharged state with a sub-module of OFF state, and changing the compared states of sub-modules of ON state and OFF state.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2013-03-05

A non-volatile latch circuit includes a pair of cross-coupled inverters, a pair of resistance-based memory elements, and write circuitry configured to write data to the pair of resistance-based memory elements. The pair of resistance-based memory elements is isolated from the pair of cross-coupled inverters during a latching operation. A sensing circuit includes a first current path that includes a resistance-based memory element and an output of the sensing circuit. The sensing circuit includes a second current path to reduce current flow through the resistance-based memory element at a first operating point of the sensing circuit.


Patent
Qualcomm and Yonsei University | Date: 2010-01-21

A resistance-based memory with a reduced voltage I/O device is disclosed. In a particular embodiment, a circuit includes a data path including a first resistive memory cell and a first load transistor. A reference path includes a second resistive memory cell and a second load transistor. The first load transistor and the second load transistor are input and output (I/O) transistors adapted to operate at a load supply voltage similar to a core supply voltage of a core transistor within the circuit.


Patent
Qualcomm and Yonsei University | Date: 2010-01-21

Systems and methods of resistance-based memory circuit parameter adjustment are disclosed. In a particular embodiment, a method of determining a set of parameters of a resistance-based memory circuit includes determining a range of sizes for a clamp transistor and selecting a set of clamp transistors having sizes within the determined range of sizes. For each clamp transistor in the set of clamp transistors, a simulation may be executed to generate a first contour graph representing current values over a range of statistical values. The first contour graph may be used to identify a read disturbance area and a design range of the gate voltage of the clamp transistor and a load of the clamp transistor. The method may execute a simulation to generate a second contour graph representing sense margin over a range of statistical values of the gate voltage of the clamp transistor and the load of the clamp transistor. A sense margin may be selected based on the second contour graph that also satisfies the design range of the first contour graph. A sense margin may be determined for a selected clamp transistor in the set of transistors and the corresponding gate voltage and the load of the selected clamp transistor is determined based on the determined sense margin.


Patent
Qualcomm and Yonsei University | Date: 2014-06-30

A static random-access memory (SRAM) memory cell includes a pair of cross-coupled inverters and a gating transistor coupled to a first node of a first inverter of the pair of cross-coupled inverters. A gate of the gating transistor is coupled to a first wordline. The gating transistor is configured to selectively couple a bitline to the first node of the first inverter responsive to a first wordline signal. The first inverter has a second node coupled to a second wordline. The first wordline and the second wordline are each independently controllable.


Patent
Snu R&Db Foundation, Yonsei University, Korea Institute of Science and Technology | Date: 2014-04-02

Provided are a novel compound, preparing method thereof, and use thereof as inhibitor of histone demethylase. The compound represented by Chemical Formula 1 has activity which inhibits histone demethylase and thus is capable of specifically and effectively inhibit activity of histone demethylase.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2011-06-30

A circuit includes a degeneration p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor (PMOS) transistor, a load PMOS transistor, and a clamp transistor configured to clamp a voltage applied to a resistance based memory element during a sensing operation. A gate of the load PMOS transistor is controlled by an output of a not-AND (NAND) circuit.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2011-06-30

A circuit includes a degeneration p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor (PMOS) transistor, a load PMOS transistor, and a clamp transistor configured to clamp a voltage applied to a resistance based memory element during a sensing operation. A gate of the load PMOS transistor is controlled by an output of an operational amplifier.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2010-04-29

In a Spin Transfer Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM) a bit cell array can have a source line substantially parallel to a word line. The source line can be substantially perpendicular to bit lines. A source line control unit includes a common source line driver and a source line selector configured to select individual ones of the source lines. The source line driver and source line selector can be coupled in multiplexed relation. A bit line control unit includes a common bit line driver and a bit line selector in multiplexed relation. The bit line control unit includes a positive channel metal oxide semiconductor (PMOS) element coupled between the common source line driver and bit line select lines and bit lines.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2012-01-09

A resistance based memory sensing circuit has reference current transistors feeding a reference node and a read current transistor feeding a sense node, each transistor has a substrate body at a regular substrate voltage during a stand-by mode and biased during a sensing mode at a body bias voltage lower than the regular substrate voltage. In one option the body bias voltage is determined by a reference voltage on the reference node. The substrate body at the regular substrate voltage causes the transistors to have a regular threshold voltage, and the substrate body at the body bias voltage causes the transistors to have a sense mode threshold voltage, lower than the regular threshold voltage.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2010-07-30

A non-volatile latch circuit includes a pair of cross-coupled inverters, a pair of resistance-based memory elements, and write circuitry configured to write data to the pair of resistance-based memory elements. The pair of resistance-based memory elements is isolated from the pair of cross-coupled inverters during a latching operation. A sensing circuit includes a first current path that includes a first resistance-based memory element and an output of the sensing circuit. The sensing circuit includes a second current path to reduce current flow through the first resistance-based memory element at a first operating point of the sensing circuit. The sensing circuit may also include an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) transistor to provide a step down supply voltage to the first current path.


Patent
Qualcomm and Yonsei University | Date: 2010-03-25

A 5 Transistor Static Random Access Memory (5T SRAM) is designed for reduced cell size and immunity to process variation. The 5T SRAM includes a storage element for storing data, wherein the storage element is coupled to a first voltage and a ground voltage. The storage element can include symmetrically sized cross-coupled inverters. A single access transistor controls read and write operations on the storage element. Control logic is configured to generate a value of the first voltage a write operation that is different from the value of the first voltage for a read operation.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2012-09-13

A low sensing current non volatile flip flop includes a first stage to sense a resistance difference between two magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) and a second stage having circuitry to amplify the output of the first stage. The output of the first stage is initially pre-charged and determined by the resistance difference of the two MTJs when the sensing operation starts. The first stage does not have a pull-up path to a source voltage (VDD), and therefore does not have a DC path from VDD to ground during the sensing operation. A slow sense enable (SE) signal slope reduces peak sensing current in the first stage. A secondary current path reduces the sensing current duration of the first stage.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2014-02-12

A resistive memory sensing method includes sensing outputs of an offset-cancelling dual stage sensing circuit (OCDS-SC) by an NMOS offset-cancelling current latched sense amplifier circuit (NOC-CLSA). The NOC-CLSA is configured with a reduced input capacitance and a reduced offset voltage. Input transistors of the NOC-CLSA are coupled between latch circuitry and ground. A first phase output of the OCDS-SC is stored by the NOC-CLSA during a pre-charge step of the NOC-CLSA operation. A second phase output of the OCDS-SC is stored by the NOC-CLSA during an offset-cancelling step of the NOC-CLSA operation. By pipelining the OCDS-SC and NOC-CLSA, a sensing delay penalty of the OCDS-SC is overcome.


Patent
LSIS Co. and Yonsei University | Date: 2014-12-03

The present disclosure provides a method for controlling a multilevel converter, the method including, detecting modulation state values and current directions of sub-modules, and designating, by one sub-module, an average number of switching for each period of an output waveform, whereinthe step of designating the average number of switching includes,grouping the sub-modules according to being in ON state or in OFF state,comparing the number of sub-modules in previous ON state and the number of sub-modules in OFF state to obtain a difference therebetween, and changing a state as much as the difference, comparing a sub-module of ON state having a high voltage as much as a predetermined value in charged state with a sub-module of OFF state having a low voltage value, and changing the compared states of sub-modules of ON state and OFF state, when the values of sub-modules of ON state are higher, and comparing a sub-module of ON state having a low voltage as much as a predetermined value in discharged state with a sub-module of OFF state having a high voltage value, and changing the compared states of sub-modules of ON state and OFF state, when the values of sub-modules of OFF state are higher.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2013-07-30

An apparatus includes a group of data cells and a reference cell coupled to the group of data cells. The reference cell includes four magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) cells.


Patent
Yonsei University and Lsis Co. | Date: 2012-12-28

A method of controlling a multilevel converter is provided. In the method of controlling a multilevel converter according to an embodiment, a sub-module having the maximum voltage and a sub-module having the minimum voltage respectively are extracted from among a plurality of sub-modules. An amount of state variation of each of the plurality of sub-modules is determined. When the amount of state variation is not determined to be 0, a direction of a current flowing through the plurality of sub-modules is detected. A subsequent state of at least one sub-module is determined according to at least one of the amount of the state variation and current direction. Subsequently an arrangement time for sub-module values can be efficiently reduced while the number of the sub-modules increases in the voltage balancing.


Patent
Yonsei University and Qualcomm | Date: 2013-03-15

A method includes sensing a state of a data cell to generate a data voltage. The state of the data cell corresponds to a state of a programmable resistance based memory element of the data cell. The method further includes sensing a state of a reference cell to generate a reference voltage. The state of the data cell and the state of the reference cell are sensed via a common sensing path. The method further includes determining a logic value of the data cell based on the data voltage and the reference voltage.


News Article | September 20, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

Graphene nanoribbons customized for medical use by William Sikkema, a Rice graduate student and co-lead author of the paper, are highly soluble in polyethylene glycol (PEG), a biocompatible polymer gel used in surgeries, pharmaceutical products and in other biological applications. When the biocompatible nanoribbons have their edges functionalized with PEG chains and are then further mixed with PEG, they form an electrically active network that helps the severed ends of a spinal cord reconnect. “Neurons grow nicely on graphene because it’s a conductive surface and it stimulates neuronal growth,” Tour says. In experiments at Rice and elsewhere, neurons have been observed growing along graphene. “We’re not the only lab that has demonstrated neurons growing on graphene in a petri dish,” he says. “The difference is other labs are commonly experimenting with water-soluble graphene oxide, which is far less conductive than graphene, or nonribbonized structures of graphene. “We’ve developed a way to add water-solubilizing polymer chains to the edges of our nanoribbons that preserves their conductivity while rendering them soluble, and we’re just now starting to see the potential for this in biomedical applications,” he says. He added that ribbonized graphene structures allow for much smaller amounts to be used while preserving a conductive pathway that bridges the damaged spinal cords. Tour says only 1 percent of Texas-PEG consists of nanoribbons, but that’s enough to form a conductive scaffold through which the spinal cord can reconnect. Texas-PEG succeeded in restoring function in a rodent with a severed spinal cord in a procedure performed at Konkuk University in South Korea by co-authors Bae Hwan Lee and C-Yoon Kim. Tour says the material reliably allowed motor and sensory neuronal signals to cross the gap 24 hours after complete transection of the spinal cord and almost perfect motor control recovery after two weeks. “This is a major advance over previous work with PEG alone, which gave no recovery of sensory neuronal signals over the same period of time and only 10 percent motor control over four weeks,” Tour says. The project began when Sikkema read about work by Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero. Sikkema thought nanoribbons might enhance research that depended on PEG’s ability to promote the fusion of cell membranes by adding electrical conductivity and directional control for neurons as they spanned the gap between sections of the spinal cord. Contact with the doctor led to a collaboration with the South Korean researchers. Tour says Texas-PEG’s potential to help patients with spinal cord injuries is too promising to be minimized. “Our goal is to develop this as a way to address spinal cord injury. We think we’re on the right path,” he says. “This is an exciting neurophysiological analysis following complete severance of a spinal cord,” Tour says. “It is not a behavioral or locomotive study of the subsequent repair. The tangential singular locomotive analysis here is an intriguing marker, but it is not in a statistically significant set of animals. The next phases of the study will highlight the locomotive and behavioral skills with statistical relevance to assess whether these qualities follow the favorable neurophysiology that we recorded here.” Kim, co-primary author of the paper, is a research professor in the Department of Stem Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea, and a researcher at Seoul National University. Lee is an associate professor of physiology at the Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul. Co-authors are In-Kyu Hwang of Konkuk University, Hanseul Oh of Seoul National University and Un Jeng Kim of the Yonsei University College of Medicine. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Professor of Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering.


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Home > Press > Graphene nanoribbons show promise for healing spinal injuries: Rice University scientists develop Texas-PEG to help knit severed, damaged spinal cords Abstract: The combination of graphene nanoribbons made with a process developed at Rice University and a common polymer could someday be of critical importance to healing damaged spinal cords in people, according to Rice chemist James Tour. The Tour lab has spent a decade working with graphene nanoribbons, starting with the discovery of a chemical process to "unzip" them from multiwalled carbon nanotubes, as revealed in a Nature paper in 2009. Since then, the researchers have used them to enhance materials for the likes of deicers for airplane wings, better batteries and less-permeable containers for natural gas storage. Now their work to develop nanoribbons for medical applications has resulted in a material dubbed Texas-PEG that may help knit damaged or even severed spinal cords. A paper on the results of preliminary animal-model tests appears today in the journal Surgical Neurology International. Graphene nanoribbons customized for medical use by William Sikkema, a Rice graduate student and co-lead author of the paper, are highly soluble in polyethylene glycol (PEG), a biocompatible polymer gel used in surgeries, pharmaceutical products and in other biological applications. When the biocompatible nanoribbons have their edges functionalized with PEG chains and are then further mixed with PEG, they form an electrically active network that helps the severed ends of a spinal cord reconnect. "Neurons grow nicely on graphene because it's a conductive surface and it stimulates neuronal growth," Tour said. In experiments at Rice and elsewhere, neurons have been observed growing along graphene. "We're not the only lab that has demonstrated neurons growing on graphene in a petri dish," he said. "The difference is other labs are commonly experimenting with water-soluble graphene oxide, which is far less conductive than graphene, or nonribbonized structures of graphene. "We've developed a way to add water-solubilizing polymer chains to the edges of our nanoribbons that preserves their conductivity while rendering them soluble, and we're just now starting to see the potential for this in biomedical applications," he said. He added that ribbonized graphene structures allow for much smaller amounts to be used while preserving a conductive pathway that bridges the damaged spinal cords. Tour said only 1 percent of Texas-PEG consists of nanoribbons, but that's enough to form a conductive scaffold through which the spinal cord can reconnect. Texas-PEG succeeded in restoring function in a rodent with a severed spinal cord in a procedure performed at Konkuk University in South Korea by co-authors Bae Hwan Lee and C-Yoon Kim. Tour said the material reliably allowed motor and sensory neuronal signals to cross the gap 24 hours after complete transection of the spinal cord and almost perfect motor control recovery after two weeks. "This is a major advance over previous work with PEG alone, which gave no recovery of sensory neuronal signals over the same period of time and only 10 percent motor control over four weeks," Tour said. The project began when Sikkema read about work by Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero. Sikkema thought nanoribbons might enhance research that depended on PEG's ability to promote the fusion of cell membranes by adding electrical conductivity and directional control for neurons as they spanned the gap between sections of the spinal cord. Contact with the doctor led to a collaboration with the South Korean researchers. Tour said Texas-PEG's potential to help patients with spinal cord injuries is too promising to be minimized. "Our goal is to develop this as a way to address spinal cord injury. We think we're on the right path," he said. "This is an exciting neurophysiological analysis following complete severance of a spinal cord," Tour said. "It is not a behavioral or locomotive study of the subsequent repair. The tangential singular locomotive analysis here is an intriguing marker, but it is not in a statistically significant set of animals. The next phases of the study will highlight the locomotive and behavioral skills with statistical relevance to assess whether these qualities follow the favorable neurophysiology that we recorded here." Kim, co-primary author of the paper, is a research professor in the Department of Stem Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea, and a researcher at Seoul National University. Lee is an associate professor of physiology at the Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul. Co-authors are In-Kyu Hwang of Konkuk University, Hanseul Oh of Seoul National University and Un Jeng Kim of the Yonsei University College of Medicine. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Professor of Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering. About Rice University Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,910 undergraduates and 2,809 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews Related For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

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