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Shimada H.,Tokyo Metropolitan University | Sawyer P.,University of Alabama at Birmingham | Harada K.,Kibi International University | Kaneya S.,Kamma Memorial Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Year: 2010

Shimada H, Sawyer P, Harada K, Kaneya S, Nihei K, Asakawa Y, Yoshii C, Hagiwara A, Furuna T, Ishizaki T. Predictive validity of the classification schema for functional mobility tests in instrumental activities of daily living decline among older adults. Objective: To determine predictive validity for cut points of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test and life-space assessment (LSA) on decline in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) among older adults. Design: Cross-sectional and 1-year follow-up study. Setting: Preventive health care services. Participants: In a cross-sectional study, 2404 older adults (65-100y) were recruited to determine cut points for the TUG and LSA for IADLs limitation. For longitudinal analysis, 436 older adults (65-100y) were followed over 1 year to explore the validity of a classification model using the cut points to predict incident IADLs decline. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The TUG, LSA, and Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology index of IADLs measurement. Results: The cut points associated with IADLs limitations for the TUG and LSA were 12 seconds and 56 points, respectively. Participants were classified into fast/high (most able; TUG <12 and LSA >56), fast/low, slow/high, and slow/low (vulnerable; TUG ≥12 and LSA ≤56) groups; there were 813 (34%), 385 (16%), 246 (10%), and 960 (40%) participants in each group, respectively. The proportions of participants with IADLs limitation in the most able, fast/low, slow/high, and vulnerable groups were 19%, 64%, 61%, and 89%, respectively. The vulnerable group included significantly more participants with IADLs limitation than any other group (P<.001). Compared with a most able group, the odds ratios of IADLs decline for the fast/low and vulnerable groups were 2.52 (95% confidence interval 1.15-5.53, P<.05) and 2.87 (95% confidence interval 1.38-5.96, P<.01), respectively. Conclusions: The combination of TUG and LSA identifies persons with future IADLs decline and has the potential to be used by community health care services to target individualized interventions. © 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.


Abe A.,Yokohama Brain and Stroke Center | Abe A.,Nippon Medical School | Ueda T.,Yokohama Brain and Stroke Center | Ueda T.,St. Marianna University School of Medicine | And 5 more authors.
Interventional Neuroradiology | Year: 2010

Although a decrease in cerebrovascular reserves (CVR) is known to enhance the risk of stroke, changes in this parameter after carotid artery stenting (CAS) have rarely been investigated. The present study is the first to compare CVR recoveries after applying CAS to patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease. CAS was performed for 31 consecutive patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease. They underwent acetazolamide-challenged single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and after CAS to obtain data on resting stage cerebral blood flow (CBFrest values) in various regions of interest (ROIs) defined by a three-dimensional stereotactic ROI template. CVR values on ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheric sides were then calculated based on the CBFrest data. The 31 patients were dichotomized into unilateral (n=22) and bilateral (n=9) lesion groups, and no significant between-group differences were observed in CBFrest before and after CAS. In the unilateral group, there were no differences in CVR values before and after CAS. In the bilateral group, however, the CVR values significantly increased in nearly all the investigated ROIs on the contralateral side. Also, the hemispheric CVR values on both sides significantly increased after CAS in the bilateral group, while no such increase was observed in the unilateral group. CAS in patients with symptomatic bilateral carotid artery disease has the potential utility for their haemodynamic improvement even on the contralateral hemispheric side.


Abe A.,Yokohama Brain and Stroke Center | Abe A.,Nippon Medical School | Ueda T.,Yokohama Brain and Stroke Center | Ueda T.,St. Marianna University School of Medicine | And 5 more authors.
Interventional Neuroradiology | Year: 2012

This study evaluated the recoveries of cerebrovascular reserves (CVR) after applying percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) to patients with symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis of varying severity. The patients were submitted to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to obtain their regional cerebral blood flows at resting stage (rCB-F rest) and acetazolamide-challenged CBF in five regions of interest (ROIs), including the MCA, on the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the hemisphere. rCVR values were then calculated from these CBF data to evaluate the CVR recoveries after PTA treatment. When the PTA effects were statistically analyzed of the patients dichotomized into more severe (n=9) and less severe (n=5) groups, distinctly significant ROI-specific PTA effectiveness was observed for CVR rather than CBF values in the patients of the severer group.


PubMed | Yokohama Brain and Stroke Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Interventional neuroradiology : journal of peritherapeutic neuroradiology, surgical procedures and related neurosciences | Year: 2012

This study evaluated the recoveries of cerebrovascular reserves (CVR) after applying percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) to patients with symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis of varying severity. The patients were submitted to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to obtain their regional cerebral blood flows at resting stage (rCBF(rest)) and acetazolamide-challenged CBF in five regions of interest (ROIs), including the MCA, on the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the hemisphere. rCVR values were then calculated from these CBF data to evaluate the CVR recoveries after PTA treatment. When the PTA effects were statistically analyzed of the patients dichotomized into more severe (n=9) and less severe (n=5) groups, distinctly significant ROI-specific PTA effectiveness was observed for CVR rather than CBF values in the patients of the severer group.


PubMed | Yokohama Brain and Stroke Center
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Interventional neuroradiology : journal of peritherapeutic neuroradiology, surgical procedures and related neurosciences | Year: 2010

Although a decrease in cerebrovascular reserves (CVR) is known to enhance the risk of stroke, changes in this parameter after carotid artery stenting (CAS) have rarely been investigated. The present study is the first to compare CVR recoveries after applying CAS to patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease. CAS was performed for 31 consecutive patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease. They underwent acetazolamide-challenged single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and after CAS to obtain data on resting stage cerebral blood flow (CBF(rest) values) in various regions of interest (ROIs) defined by a three-dimensional stereotactic ROI template. CVR values on ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheric sides were then calculated based on the CBF(rest) data. The 31 patients were dichotomized into unilateral (n=22) and bilateral (n=9) lesion groups, and no significant between-group differences were observed in CBF(rest) before and after CAS. In the unilateral group, there were no differences in CVR values before and after CAS. In the bilateral group, however, the CVR values significantly increased in nearly all the investigated ROIs on the contralateral side. Also, the hemispheric CVR values on both sides significantly increased after CAS in the bilateral group, while no such increase was observed in the unilateral group. CAS in patients with symptomatic bilateral carotid artery disease has the potential utility for their haemodynamic improvement even on the contralateral hemispheric side.

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