New York City, NY, United States

Yeshiva University

www.yu.edu
New York City, NY, United States

Yeshiva University is a private university in New York City, with four campuses in New York City. Founded in 1886, it is a research university.The university's undergraduate schools—Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Syms School of Business— offer a dual curriculum inspired by Modern-Centrist-Orthodox Judaism's hashkafa of Torah Umadda combining academic education with the study of Torah. Yeshiva is perhaps best known for its secular, highly selective graduate schools, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. The Forward announced on May 27, 2014 that Yeshiva would be shedding the financial burden of Albert Einstein College of Medicine by initiating an arrangement with Montefiore Hospital.Yeshiva University is an independent institution chartered by New York State. It is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and by several professional agencies. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Patent
Yeshiva University | Date: 2016-08-08

Methods and compositions are provided for alleviating and/or preventing one or more side effects associated with exposure to radiation in a subject exposed to radiation or at risk for exposure to radiation comprising oral administration to the subject of an amount of an edible source of melanin effective to alleviate a side effect associated with radiation.


Patent
Yeshiva University | Date: 2017-01-11

Recombinant herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) vaccine vectors, virions thereof, compositions and vaccines comprising such, and methods of use thereof are each provided.


Patent
Yeshiva University | Date: 2017-04-26

Methods and compositions for clonally inhibiting or clonally stimulating T-cells are provided.


Patent
Yeshiva University | Date: 2017-04-05

Methods are provided for identifying an agent that directly modulates a Bcl-2- associated x-protein (BAX) by promoting or disrupting dimerization of the BAX. Agents that directly modulate BAX by affecting dimerization are also provided.


Patent
VICTORIA LINK Ltd and Yeshiva University | Date: 2016-11-10

The present invention relates to 3-hydroxypyrrolidine compounds of the general formula (1) which are inhibitors of 5-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase or 5-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase. The invention also relates to the use of these compounds in the treatment of diseases or conditions in which it is desirable to in 5-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase or 5-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase including cancer, and to pharmaceutical compositions containing the compounds.


Methods for treating and for preventing Filovirus infections are disclosed, as well as compositions therefor.


Patent
Yeshiva University | Date: 2017-06-28

Heritable mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 and other genes in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway increase risk of breast, ovarian and other cancers. In response to DNA breaks, the proteins encoded by these genes bind to each other and are transported into the nucleus to form nuclear foci and initiate homologous recombination. Flow cytometry-based functional variant analyses (FVAs) were developed to determine whether variants in BRCA1 or other DSB repair genes disrupted the binding of BRCA1 to its protein partners, the phosphorylation of p53 or the transport of the BRCA1complex to the nucleus in response to DNA damage. Each of these assays distinguished high-risk BRCA1 mutations from low-risk BRCA1 controls. Mutations in other DSB repair pathway genes produced molecular phenocopies with these assays. FVA assays may represent an adjunct to sequencing for categorizing VUS or may represent a stand-alone measure for assessing breast cancer risk.


Patent
Yeshiva University | Date: 2017-03-10

Recombinant herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) vaccine vectors, virions thereof, compositions and vaccines comprising such, and methods of use thereof are each provided.


Schramm V.L.,Yeshiva University
Annual Review of Biochemistry | Year: 2011

Experimental analysis of enzymatic transition-state structures uses kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) to report on bonding and geometry differences between reactants and the transition state. Computational correlation of experimental values with chemical models permits three-dimensional geometric and electrostatic assignment of transition states formed at enzymatic catalytic sites. The combination of experimental and computational access to transition-state information permits (a) the design of transition-state analogs as powerful enzymatic inhibitors, (b) exploration of protein features linked to transition-state structure, (c) analysis of ensemble atomic motions involved in achieving the transition state, (d) transition-state lifetimes, and (e) separation of ground-state (Michaelis complexes) from transition-state effects. Transition-state analogs with picomolar dissociation constants have been achieved for several enzymatic targets. Transition states of closely related isozymes indicate that the protein's dynamic architecture is linked to transition-state structure. Fast dynamic motions in catalytic sites are linked to transition-state generation. Enzymatic transition states have lifetimes of femtoseconds, the lifetime of bond vibrations. Binding isotope effects (BIEs) reveal relative reactant and transition-state analog binding distortion for comparison with actual transition states. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Frangogiannis N.G.,Yeshiva University
Physiological Reviews | Year: 2012

The term matricellular proteins describes a family of structurally unrelated extracellular macromolecules that, unlike structural matrix proteins, do not play a primary role in tissue architecture, but are induced following injury and modulate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. When released to the matrix, matricellular proteins associate with growth factors, cytokines, and other bioactive effectors and bind to cell surface receptors transducing signaling cascades. Matricellular proteins are upregulated in the injured and remodeling heart and play an important role in regulation of inflammatory, reparative, fibrotic and angiogenic pathways. Thrombospondin (TSP)-1, -2, and -4 as well as tenascin-C and -X secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), osteopontin, periostin, and members of the CCN family (including CCN1 and CCN2/connective tissue growth factor) are involved in a variety of cardiac pathophysiological conditions, including myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, aging-associated myocardial remodeling, myocarditis, diabetic cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease. This review discusses the properties and characteristics of the matricellular proteins and presents our current knowledge on their role in cardiac adaptation and disease. Understanding the role of matricellular proteins in myocardial pathophysiology and identification of the functional domains responsible for their actions may lead to design of peptides with therapeutic potential for patients with heart disease. © 2012 by the American Physiological Society.

Loading Yeshiva University collaborators
Loading Yeshiva University collaborators