Yarra Valley Water

Mitcham, Australia

Yarra Valley Water

Mitcham, Australia
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Gato-Trinidad S.,Swinburne University of Technology | Gan K.,Yarra Valley Water
Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium 2014, HWRS 2014 - Conference Proceedings | Year: 2014

The design of water and wastewater supply systems is traditionally based on maximum water demand which is a function of multiple factors. Understanding these factors and how these affect maximum water demand will lead to the estimation of appropriate peak design factors for a more cost effective design of water and wastewater supply systems. This paper describes the maximum water demand of seven separate residential suburbs in Greater Melbourne, Australia with populations ranging from 1000 to 23000. The study involves the analysis of water consumption data recorded at five-minute interval over one year. The effects of population and the sampling interval on the peak factor have been analysed. From a set of data collected at five-minute interval, further data sets at 10, 20, 30 and 60-minute have been derived. New equations to estimate the peak flow demand for small number of population have been developed. Results also show that at five-minute interval a more accurate peak design factor have been estimated. It is however, recommended that more suburbs be analysed to enable generalisation of results.


Gato-Trinidad S.,Swinburne University of Technology | Gan K.,Yarra Valley Water
Journal of Water Supply: Research and Technology - AQUA | Year: 2014

A preliminary analysis of the effectiveness of a rainwater tank rebate scheme for both the Victorian Government and individual householders who participated in the scheme was undertaken, together with a determination of the factors affecting the water savings achieved. Yarra Valley Water provided the data for 4,391 households who received a government rebate for installing a rainwater tank and for 4,400 households who did not participate in the scheme. The water savings from different tank sizes were calculated. A comparison of water consumption between households with rainwater tanks and those without was also undertaken to determine the benefit of rolling the rebate scheme to households who are currently not under the scheme. The analysis revealed that installation of rainwater tanks contributed to a reduction of 42.5% in average household water consumption. The results also show that, depending on the tank size and uses of rainwater, the payback period (PP) ranged from 12 to 47 years for householders and 1 to 12 years for the Victorian Government. All rainwater tank sizes except 2,000-4,999 L with connection to toilets and/or laundry have PPs of less than 20 years to householders. This is due to the high capital and operating costs even with higher rebates from the government. © IWA Publishing 2014.


Gato-Trinidad S.,Swinburne University of Technology | Gan K.,Yarra Valley Water
WIT Transactions on the Built Environment | Year: 2011

The design of water and wastewater supply systems is traditionally based on maximum water demand which is a function of multiple factors. Understanding these factors and how these affect maximum water demand will lead to the estimation of appropriate peak design factors for a more cost effective design of water and wastewater supply systems. This paper describes the maximum water demand of four separate residential suburbs in Greater Melbourne, Australia with populations ranging from 1000 to 20,774. The study involves the analysis of water consumption data recorded at five-minute intervals over one year. The effects of population and the sampling interval on the peak factor have been analysed. From a set of data collected at five-minute intervals, further data sets at 10, 20, 30 and 60 minutes have been derived. New equations to estimate the peak flow demand for a small number of the population have been developed. Results also show that at five-minute intervals, a more accurate peak design factor has been estimated. © 2012 WIT Press.


Gato-Trinidad S.,Swinburne University of Technology | Jayasuriya N.,RMIT University | Roberts P.,Yarra Valley Water
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2011

The 'end use' of water is a breakdown of the total household water usage such as water used for toilets, showers, washing machines, taps, lawn watering, etc. Understanding end uses of water will enable water planners, water authorities and household owners determine where water is used/wasted, how much and how often. This paper describes the end uses of water from a number of single-family homes in Greater Melbourne, Australia. The study involves the analysis of water consumption data recorded at 5-s intervals from logged households collected by Yarra Valley Water in Melbourne in 2004. The study determines how much water is used for outdoor and indoor purposes in a single-family home in Melbourne and compares the water usage during winter and summer. Hourly patterns of major end uses of water are also developed. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the end uses of water and to assist where to focus water conservation efforts that would be most effective financially and environmentally, and be acceptable to everyone. © IWA Publishing 2011.


Tjandraatmadja G.,CSIRO | Sharma A.K.,CSIRO | Grant T.,Life Cycle Strategies Pty Ltd | Pamminger F.,Yarra Valley Water
Water Resources Management | Year: 2013

This paper describes a decision support methodology for the selection of a wastewater treatment system based on integrated urban water management principles for a remote settlement with failing septic systems. Thirty-two service and treatment technologies options were considered, these included: (i) conventional gravity sewerage, (ii) common effluent drainage, (iii) community sewage treatment plant based on various technology options (lagoon treatment, Living Machine®, sequencing batch reactor, membrane biological reactor, rotating biological contactor, recirculating textile filter, extended aeration) with and without urine separation, greywater diversion or treatment and reuse at household scale. The options were assessed using a framework that considered technical, economic, environmental and social factors relevant to the local community and associated stakeholders (water utility, government agencies) and tools such as engineering design, life cycle assessment and multi-criteria analysis for evaluation of overall sustainability. Adoption of a systems approach allowed the identification of benefits and trade-offs among stakeholders creating opportunities for adoption of more innovative treatment options and maximisation of the sustainability of the service. The treatment option that maximised the social, environmental and economic benefits for the settlement consisted of individual households adopting greywater treatment, storage and reuse, urine separation and a community wastewater treatment plant with recirculating textile filter technology. This solution provided the required sanitation, increased the sources of water supply to residents, satisfied environmental regulator requirements, minimised nitrogen discharge to waterways and provided an option for beneficial reuse of urine for neighbouring farmers at a cost and management needs acceptable to the water utility. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Sharma A.K.,CSIRO | Tjandraatmadja G.,CSIRO | Grant A.L.,BMT WBM Pty. Ltd. | Grant T.,RMIT University | Pamminger F.,Yarra Valley Water
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2010

The provision of water and wastewater services to peri-urban areas faces very different challenges to providing services to cities. Sustainable solutions for such areas are increasingly being sought, in order to solve the environmental and health risks posed by failing septic systems. These solutions should have the capability to reduce potable water demand, provide fit for purpose reuse options, and minimise impacts on the local and global environment. A methodology for the selection of sustainable sewerage servicing systems and technologies is presented in this paper. This paper describes the outcomes of applying this methodology to a case study in rural community near Melbourne, Australia, and describes the economic and environmental implications of various sewerage servicing options. Applying this methodology has found that it is possible to deliver environmental improvements at a lower community cost, by choosing servicing configurations not historically used by urban water utilities. The selected solution is currently being implemented, with the aim being to generate further transferable learnings for the water industry. © IWA Publishing 2010.


Rathnayaka K.,University of Melbourne | Maheepala S.,CSIRO | Nawarathna B.,Urban Water Balance Unit | George B.,University of Melbourne | And 3 more authors.
Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Year: 2014

This study investigates the variability of household water use in Melbourne with the aim of improving the current understanding of factors affecting residential water use. This understanding is critical to predicting household water demand, particularly at an appropriate spatial and temporal resolution to support Integrated Urban Water Management based planning and to improve the understanding on how different household water demands respond to demand management strategies. The study used two sets of data each collected from 837 households under significantly different water use conditions in the years 2003 and 2011. Data from each household consist of the household characteristics and quarterly metre readings. Ordinary Least Square regression analysis followed by detailed analysis of each factor was used to identify key factors affecting household water use. The variables studied are household size, typology of dwelling, appliance efficiency, presence of children under 12 years, presence of children aged between 12 and 18 years, tenancy, dwelling age, presence of swimming pool, evaporative cooler, and dishwasher. All of them except presence of children aged between 12 and 18 years, tenancy and dwelling age were identified as variables that contribute to the variability of household water use in Melbourne. The study also found that the explanatory capacity of these variables increases with decreasing water use. This paper also discusses the significance of the explanatory variables, their impact and how they vary over the seasons and years. The variables found in this study can be used to inform improved prediction and modelling of residential water demand. The paper also explores other possible drivers to explain residential water use in light of the moderate explanatory capacity of the variables selected for this study thus, provides useful insights into future research into water demand modelling. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Marlow D.R.,CSIRO | Boulaire F.,CSIRO | Beale D.J.,CSIRO | Grundy C.,Yarra Valley Water | Moglia M.,CSIRO
Journal of Infrastructure Systems | Year: 2010

Managing sewer blockages represents a significant operational challenge for water utilities. In Australia, company-level blockage rates are used to compare the effectiveness of the management strategies of different utilities. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this basis may not be a fair one for comparison because blockages are influenced by a range of factors beyond management control and vary from company to company. This issue was investigated as part of a broader research effort on sewer-blockage management undertaken in conjunction with the Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA) and its members. A Web-based survey was used to collate expert opinion on factors that influence blockage rate. The identified factors were then investigated in an exploratory analysis of blockage-related data provided by two participating utilities, supported by literature reviews. The results indicate that blockage rate is influenced by a range of factors, including asset attributes, climatic conditions, water consumption, and soil type. Because these factors vary from utility to utility, this research supports the finding that company-level blockage rate in itself is not an appropriate metric for comparing management effectiveness. © 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.


News Article | April 22, 2015
Site: www.theguardian.com

You can run but you can’t hide … or flush your toilet. Yep, it’s the return of the fatberg, a monstrous blob of congealed fat, waste, and wet wipes coming soon to asewer near you. Especially if you happen to live in west London. This week’s culprit is a 40-metre bruiser removed from under the leafy streets of Chelsea and weighing as much as five Porsches. The latest fatberg was so big-boned it broke a 70-year-old sewer pipe, leaving Thames Water with a £400,000 repair bill. It wasn’t even the area’s worst. In 2013, “Britain’s biggest berg”, weighing 15 tonnes and as long as a double-decker bus, was found in Kingston upon Thames, and last year a fatberg the size of a Boeing 747 was discovered under the streets of Shepherd’s Bush. It’s only a matter of time before a fatberg as mighty as the Titanic herself bursts out of the manholes on High Street Ken and starts ransacking the place, Slimer-from-Ghostbusters style. “It’s definitely getting worse,” says Craig Rance, a campaigns executive at Thames Water. “We’re seeing a rise in the number of wipes being flushed down the toilet as people move away from toilet paper. And only one in 10 know how their drains work. People think the toilet is some magic portal that makes everything disappear, but it all has to go somewhere.” And why west London? “There is a high density of people, a lot of food outlets, and [it’s] a place where just getting rid of the rubbish is the main issue,” is his rather diplomatic answer. A fatberg, he notes, “smells like the worst wet dog you’ve ever encountered” and the bigger the sewer, the bigger the hound. “The sewer from Leicester Square through Whitehall is about two metres high and several metres wide and it can become completely clogged with fatbergs,” he says. “Three years ago our guys spent three weeks digging out one fatberg that was threatening to flood the whole of Leicester Square.” There doesn’t seem to be a city in the western world without its very own plague, however. Earlier this year a three-foot wide mass, largely constructed out of takeaway grease, was found under one of Cardiff’s busiest streets, and in Scotland it’s thought fatbergs are to blame for more than 40,000 blockages. Clearing “backups” caused by grease in New York City cost an estimated $4.65m (£3.1m) in 2013, though the Washington Post points out only London has thought to give the phenomenon “such a dubiously affectionate name”. And in Melbourne last year a buildup “of epic proportions” was found in the sewage system, prompting a Yarra Valley Water spokesman to warn its citizens: “We all know where number ones and number twos should go, but there is no such thing as a number three, so please do not put anything else down the drain.” If only someone would tell west Londoners.


ST. LOUIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aegion Corporation Awarded Three-Year Term Contract Valued at $18 Million USD from Yarra Valley Water

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