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Sapporo, Japan

Yamamoto T.,Yamamoto ENT Clinic | Asakura K.,Muroran Municipal Hospital | Shirasaki H.,Sapporo Medical University | Himi T.,Sapporo Medical University
Journal of Otolaryngology of Japan | Year: 2015

Background: Persons allergic to birch pollen often report oral and pharyngeal hypersensitivity to fruit and vegetables, due to immunological cross-reactivity between pollen and foods. This phenomenon is referred to as the oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Such cross-reactive antigen reactions mainly involve Bet v 1, which is the major birch-pollen allergen, and partially involve birch-pollen profilin Bet v 2. Soybean contains Bet v 1-related antigen (Gly m 4), and soy milk often causes the OAS with severe symptoms such as precordial and abdominal burning sensation because soy milk undergoes little denaturation, and this water-soluble liquid is consumed by most people rather quickly. We evaluated the frequency of the OAS after ingestion of soymilk and examined IgE antibodies to various allergens. Methods: A total of 167 patients [122 women, 45 men; age range, 4-72 years (mean age, 32 years)], who had experienced OAS episodes and had IgE birch-pollen antibodies, were interviewed. Using the CAP system, we examined IgE antibodies to birch pollen and other allergens. Of 167 patients, 161 were examined for IgE antibodies to Bet v 1, Bet v 2, Gly m 4, and soybean. We evaluated the frequency of the OAS after soy milk ingestion based on reports by OAS patients with birch pollen allergy, and evaluated the positive rates of some of the IgE antibodies. Results: Among the 167 patients with birch-pollen allergy and OAS on ingestion of any of the foods, there were 16 cases (10%) with OAS following soy milk ingestion. In addition, the foods that caused OAS most often were apples (123 cases, 74%), peaches (67%), and cherries (55%), followed by pears (37%) and kiwi (37%). A higher CAP class for birch pollen, Bet v 1, Gly m 4, and soybean was associated with a higher prevalence of OAS to soy milk. Of 15 patients who had OAS on ingestion of soy milk and had birch-pollen allergy, 47% (7cases) were CAP class ≥1 for soybean and only 7% (1case) was CAP class ≥2, whereas 93% (14cases) were CAP class ≥1 for Gly m 4, and 87% (13cases) were CAP class ≥2 for Gly m 4. Conclusion: Among the birch-pollen allergic OAS patients, 10% had the OAS on ingestion of soy milk, and among these with birch-pollen allergy and the OAS on ingestion of soy milk, the positive rate for soy milk CAP was low, whereas that for Gly m 4 CAP was high.


Shirasaki H.,Sapporo Medical University | Yamamoto T.,Yamamoto ENT Clinic | Saikawa E.,Sapporo Medical University | Seki N.,Sapporo Medical University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Otolaryngology of Japan | Year: 2014

Occurrence of airborne pollen in Sapporo has been studied for 19 years during the period between 1995 and 2013. There are wide year-to-year variations in the quantities of birch pollens. A simple linear regression with the least squares method was used for studying correlations between the annual quantities of birch pollens and the meteorological factors. A significant positive correlation was found between the hours of sunlight in June of the preceding year and the annual birch pollen concentrations with the correlation coefficient, R= 0.667. Also, we found the significant positive correlation between the hours of sunlight in March and the annual birch pollen concentrations with the correlation coefficient, R= 0.684. These results suggest that the atmospheric birch pollen counts can be predicted from meteorological factors.


Yamamoto T.,Yamamoto ENT Clinic | Asakura K.,Muroran Municipal Hospital | Shirasaki H.,Sapporo Medical University | Himi T.,Sapporo Medical University
Journal of Otolaryngology of Japan | Year: 2013

[Background] In Hokkaido and Scandinavia, birch pollen allergic persons are common and they often report oral and pharyngeal hypersensitivity to fruits and vegetables (oral allergy syndrome, OAS), because of immunological cross-reactivity. In Scandinavia, nuts as well as Rosaceae fruits such as apples were the foods most often reported to elicit symptoms. On the other hand, nuts are minor foods causing hypersensitivity in Japan. Even in Japan, regional differences of foods causing hypersensitivity have been reported, which may be related to the regional differences of elementary habit and pollen dispersion. In the present study, we evaluated the intake history of the foods and the frequency of food hypersensitivity in adults from the general population. [Methods] Three hundreds and thirty nine subjects (20-67 years old) took part in the study. With a questionnaire survey, we asked them about their intake history and hypersensitive symptoms for 33 kinds of fruit, vegetables, and nuts. [Results] 30% of subjects had eaten Brazil nuts, 80% had eaten pomegranates, and 81% had eaten hazelnuts. And over 95% of subjects had eaten the other 30 foods. Those who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years had a higher frequency of plum consumption than the others. Those who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years had a lower frequency of loquat, fig and pomegranate consumption than the others. Food hypersensitivity was found in 52 subjects (15.3%). The most common symptom was OAS (46 subjects, 13.6%), and foods most frequently causing OAS were peach (21 subjects, 6.2%), cherry (19 subjects, 5.6%) and apple (17 subjects, 5.0%). 26 subjects (7.7%) reported OAS to Rosaceae fruits. The ratio of having OAS to consuming Rosaceae fruits was 11.0% in the group who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years, which was higher than the group who has lived in Hokkaido for less than 20 years. The intake history of hazelnuts and Brazil nuts was very low, with a correspondingly low frequency of food hypersensitivity associated with these nuts. [Conclusion] The frequency of intake and hypersensitivity of some foods differ among different regions.


Yamamoto T.,Yamamoto ENT Clinic | Asakura K.,Muroran Municipal Hospital | Shirasaki H.,Sapporo Medical University | Himi T.,Sapporo Medical University
Journal of Otolaryngology of Japan | Year: 2010

Background: Persons allergic to birch pollen often report oral and pharyngeal hypersensitivity to fruit and vegetables, such as apples and peaches due to immunological cross-reactivity, or oral allergy syndrome (OAS) sometimes accompanied by systemic reaction. Such cross-reactive antigen reactions involve Bet v 1, the main birch-pollen allergen, and Bet v 2, birch-pollen profilin. We evaluated the food/antigen relationship. Methods: Subjects interviewed numbered 60-40 women and 20 men aged 12 to 70 (mean age: 35 years)-suffering OAS episodes and having IgE birch-pollen antibodies. Using CAP scoring we examined IgE antibodies to recombinant Bet v 1 (rBet v l), recombinant Bet v 2 (rBet v 2), and recombinant Pru p 3 (rPru p 3) a peach lipid transfer protein (LTP). A CAP score of 0.35 or more was considered positive. We evaluated the relationship between recombinant allergens and 9 fruit often involving OAS - apple, peach, cherry, kiwi, pear, melon, plum, strawberry, and watermelon - based on subjects' reports. Results: Of the 60, all (100%) were rBet v 1-positive, 9 (15%) rBet v 2-positive, and none (0%) rPru p 3-positive. Rose-family fruit-apples, peaches, cherries, pears, plums, and strawberries-often caused OAS regardless of positive or negative rBet v 2 CAP and were associated with rBet v 1. In contrast, more of those who were rBet v 2 CAP-positive had OAS to non-rose-family fruit-melon and watermelon-than those rBet v 2-negative. In rose-family and non-rose-family classification of the 9 fruit, cluster analysis and kappa statistics showed non-rose-family melon, watermelon, and kiwi to be associated with rBet v 2, as were grass and mugwort pollen allergies. Conclusion: Bet v 1 is associated with OAS due to rose-family fruit and Bet v 2 with OAS due to non-rose-family fruit.


Yamamoto T.,Yamamoto ENT Clinic | Asakura K.,Yamamoto ENT Clinic | Shirasaki H.,Yamamoto ENT Clinic | Himi T.,Yamamoto ENT Clinic
Nihon Jibiinkoka Gakkai kaiho | Year: 2010

BACKGROUND: Persons allergic to birch pollen often report oral and pharyngeal hypersensitivity to fruit and vegetables, such as apples and peaches due to immunological cross-reactivity, or oral allergy syndrome (OAS) sometimes accompanied by systemic reaction. Such cross-reactive antigen reactions involve Bet v 1, the main birch-pollen allergen, and Bet v 2, birch-pollen profilin. We evaluated the food/antigen relationship.METHODS: Subjects interviewed numbered 60-40 women and 20 men aged 12 to 70 (mean age: 35 years)-suffering OAS episodes and having IgE birch-pollen antibodies. Using CAP scoring we examined IgE antibodies to recombinant Bet v 1 (rBet v 1), recombinant Bet v 2 (rBet v 2), and recombinant Pru p 3 (rPru p 3) a peach lipid transfer protein (LTP). A CAP score of 0.35 or more was considered positive. We evaluated the relationship between recombinant allergens and 9 fruit often involving OAS--apple, peach, cherry, kiwi, pear, melon, plum, strawberry, and watermelon-based on subjects' reports.RESULTS: Of the 60, all (100%) were rBet v 1-positive, 9 (15%) rBet v 2-positive, and none (0%) rPru p 3-positive. Rose-family fruit-apples, peaches, cherries, pears, plums, and strawberries-often caused OAS regardless of positive or negative rBet v 2 CAP and were associated with rBet v 1. In contrast, more of those who were rBet v 2 CAP-positive had OAS to non-rose-family fruit-melon and watermelon-than those rBet v 2-negative. In rose-family and non-rose-family classification of the 9 fruit, cluster analysis and kappa statistics showed non-rose-family melon, watermelon, and kiwi to be associated with rBet v 2, as were grass and mugwort pollen allergies.CONCLUSION: Bet v 1 is associated with OAS due to rose-family fruit and Bet v 2 with OAS due to non-rose-family fruit.

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