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Ji X.,Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps Key Laboratory of Special Fruits and Vegetables Cultivation Physiology and Germplasm Resources Utilization | Ji X.,Shihezi University | Zhang Y.M.,Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps Key Laboratory of Special Fruits and Vegetables Cultivation Physiology and Germplasm Resources Utilization | Zhang Y.M.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | And 4 more authors.
Vegetos | Year: 2014

In arid land, water is a limiting factor, the distribution and species of vegetation are greatly affected by water supply. Moss crust is the main components of biological soil crusts (BSCs), it plays an important role in water retention than crusted lichen and algae and generally, moss crust remain distributed in patches. This paper focuses on further explaining the reason that moss crust distribute in the form of different sizes patches from the point of water using. In this study, sizes of moss crust was calculated by Photoshop CS 5.0, dew deposition and water evaporation were measured by micro-lysimeters, soil water content was analyzed by drying oven. The results showed size effect of moss crust on water evaporation which was not consistent, smaller patch evaporated slowly but later, they evaporated fast and large patch evaporated slowly; the medium-size patch showed the greatest deposition ability, and the smallest exhibited the least; there was heterogeneity of soil water content of moss crusts patches, the waterisland of moss crust was a little smaller than patch size; usually, water content of moss crusts patch decreased from center to edge. In whole, medium size patches showed high water using efficiency, it was one of the reasons why there were few large moss crusts patches in the Gurbantunggut Desert. We inferred preliminarily it was a tactic to raise water using efficiency for moss crusts to distribute in patches. © 2014 Society for Plant Research. All rights reserved. Source


Pei M.,Shihezi University | Pei M.,Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps Key Laboratory of Special Fruits and Vegetables Cultivation Physiology and Germplasm Resources Utilization | Niu J.,Shihezi University | Niu J.,Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps Key Laboratory of Special Fruits and Vegetables Cultivation Physiology and Germplasm Resources Utilization | And 6 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2016

Background: The objective of this study was to increase understanding about genetic mechanisms affecting calyx persistence in Korla fragrant pear (Pyrus brestschneideri Rehd). Flowers were collected at early bloom, full bloom, and late bloom. The RNA was extracted from the flowers and then combined according to calyx type. Transcriptome and digital gene expression (DGE) profiles of flowers, ovaries, and sepals with persistent calyx (SC_hua, SC_ep, and SC_zf, respectively) were compared with those of flowers, ovaries, and sepals with deciduous calyx (TL_hua, TL_ep, and TL_zf, respectively). Temporal changes in the expression of selected genes in floral organs with either persistent or deciduous calyx were compared using real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). Results: Comparison of the transcriptome sequences for SC_hua and TL_hua indicated 26 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with known relationship to abscission and 10 DEGs with unknown function. We identified 98 MYB and 21 SPL genes from the assembled unigenes. From SC_zf vs TL_zf, we identified 21 DEGs with known relationship to abscission and 18 DEGs with unknown function. From SC_ep vs TL_ep, 12 DEGs with known relationship to abscission were identified along with 11 DEGs with unknown function. Ten DEGs were identified by both transcriptome sequencing and DGE sequencing. Conclusions: More than 50 DEGs were observed that were related to calyx persistence in Korla fragrant pear. Some of the genes were related to cell wall degradation, plant hormone signal transduction, and stress response. Other DEGs were identified as zinc finger protein genes and lipid transfer protein genes. Further analysis showed that calyx persistence in Korla fragment pear was a metabolic process regulated by many genes related to cell wall degradation and plant hormones. © 2016 Pei et al. Source

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