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Patent
Xandem Technology, LLC | Date: 2014-03-14

Systems and methods are provided for device-free motion detection and presence detection within an area of interest. A plurality of nodes, configured to be arranged around the area of interest, form a wireless network. The plurality of nodes transmit wireless signals as radio waves and receive transmitted wireless signals. The received signal strength (RSS) of the transmitted wireless signals between the plurality of nodes are measured and a value is reported. A computing device receives the reported values for the measured RSS and tracks the reported values over time. The computing device processes the reported values using an aggregate disturbance calculation to detect motion and presence within the area of interest. The computing device may notify notification device of a detected disturbance within the area of interest.


Patent
Xandem Technology, LLC | Date: 2011-12-13

Systems and methods are provided for device-free motion detection and presence detection within an area of interest. A plurality of nodes, configured to be arranged around the area of interest, form a wireless network. The plurality of nodes transmit wireless signals as radio waves and receive transmitted wireless signals. The received signal strength (RSS) of the transmitted wireless signals between the plurality of nodes are measured and a value is reported. A computing device receives the reported values for the measured RSS and tracks the reported values over time. The computing device processes the reported values using an aggregate disturbance calculation to detect motion and presence within the area of interest. The computing device may notify notification device of a detected disturbance within the area of interest.


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2013

This SBIR Phase I project will investigate the possibility of using a network of low-cost, battery-powered radio frequency (RF) transceivers to detect, localize and track the movements of people illegally trying to enter the US borders through wooded areas. The system uses radio tomography (RT), i.e., the changes in radio signal strength (RSS) measurements on the static links of the network over time, to localize and track stationary and moving targets. In a wooded environment, a major challenge is represented by the environmental noise, i.e., the changes in RSS introduced by e.g. wind and rain. In this project, we will demonstrate noise reduction algorithms capable of learning the characteristics of the environmental noise and filtering it from the collected RSS signals. This allows the system to detect a person crossing a link line despite the environmental noise. Moreover, in remote wooded areas, the battery-powered RF sensors composing the system must function for an extended period of time (e.g., one year). We will address the issue of power efficiency first by developing a self-synchronizing communication protocol which enables radio duty-cycling. Second, the system will adaptively adjust the sampling (i.e., communication) rate of the sensors depending on the detection of significant events (i.e., intrusions of people in the monitored area). We will test large-scale deployments of RF sensors in wooded areas and process the collected data off-line to demonstrate the ability of our RT system to accurately track people as they move through the deployment area.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will investigate the rapid deployment of wireless networks for the purpose of device-free localization (DFL) in tactical through-building surveillance applications. DFL locates people inside of a building using only simple radio devices deployed on the outside of the building. In a police or military operation, these devices are thrown or launched around the building, and then measure the received signal strength (RSS) between many pairs of devices. Within seconds of deployment, the DFL system shows a map tracking people and objects within the building. Such a system requires rapid deployment techniques and real-time operator-free network configuration. This project will advance the state-of-the-art in self-configuring and adaptive wireless networks. Methods for using reconfigurable antennas to direct the antenna pattern through the building regardless of how a sensor lands will be developed. For operator-free deployment, the network will have devices which self-localize, and learn the statistics of the particular radio channels to be measured. The combined results will show that tactically deployed wireless devices can be used to rapidly obtain intelligence regarding occupants before entering a dangerous building. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project are significant, as lives are lost every year because law enforcement officers do not know what is happening on the other side of a wall. If successful, this project will enable a product for police/SWAT and military special operations forces (SOF) which will save lives by providing actionable intelligence prior to entering a dangerous building. Existing radar technology for through-wall imaging is too expensive ($100k) for all but the most cost-insensitive applications. We plan a product that, because of its low cost, small size, and ease of use, will be standard equipment in police departments and in SOF teams. We will thus capture a portion of an $78 billion surveillance equipment market, which is growing at a 10-13% annual rate. Development of rapid deployment technologies for wireless networks will benefit a wide range of environmental monitoring and "internet-of-things" systems.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 483.91K | Year: 2013

The innovation of this SBIR Phase II project is the development and commercialization of a low-cost through-building surveillance product for police and SWAT teams that locates and tracks people across an entire building using a network of wireless sensors deployed around the outside of the building. Unlike other through-single-wall imaging technologies, a device does not need to be held against a wall. This project will develop new technologies that make the system useful for police team end-users to quickly deploy and use without extensive training. Specifically, the produce should investigate methods to achieve robust connectivity across larger buildings; develop capabilities for 2.5-dimensional (x,y + floor) imaging and tracking; develop adaptive estimation algorithms that automatically adjust to the environment; develop devices suited for rapid deployment, and develop a real-time commercial prototype including user interface. At the end of the project, the combination of these developments should allow delivery of a prototype to a SWAT team for them to deploy and use on their own in a training exercise. The broader/commercial impact is the commercialization of a technology for police and SWAT (special weapons and tactics) teams to quickly obtain situational intelligence that will save lives. Lives are lost every year because law enforcement officers do not know what is happening inside a building prior to entering. In addition, other life-saving applications will benefit from technologies developed, for example: military urban operations; building security and homeland security systems; finding people alive in collapsed buildings or during fire rescue; and worker safety systems. The firms technology is also useful in systems that allow elderly to live longer in their own home by monitoring their activities to ensure their safety and health. The proposed solution to these challenges is uniquely useful because it does not require a person to wear or carry any device, and cannot image a person's face or features, thus preserving privacy. The technology is capable of "seeing" through walls, even in the dark or through smoke. These features make it compelling for indoor and outdoor security systems, in-home monitoring systems, "smart building" energy-conservation systems, and other context-aware computing systems. This project develops technologies for a new sensing modality with many compelling applications.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will develop a
revolutionary new sensor for aging-in-place and assisted living which uses a network of
radio frequency (RF) transceivers as a sensor in a home to track a person?s location and
detect falls. The sensor is contact-free, i.e., a person does not need to remember to wear it
in order to be monitored. The system monitors links for changes in signal strength which
indicate a person being near the line between two transceivers. Algorithms use the link
information to infer the location of a person. With transceivers at two different heights,
algorithms can distinguish whether a person is standing, sitting, or laying on the floor, and
use the speed at which someone moves to the floor to detect a dangerous fall. Room-level
tracking can also be used to look for unusual patterns which indicate physical or cognitive
decline. This project will develop methods to minimize deployment time and expertise. It
will develop novel algorithms that allow for a lower density of transceivers in the system,
and still achieve room-level tracking and fall detection accuracy. Live demonstrations will
be conducted with potential investors and customers.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the ability for the sensor to
increase the ability of an elder to safely age-in-place in their preferred living environment,
benefitting them and reducing the costs of nursing home care. Unfortunately, many older
people fall each year, often when alone, resulting in long delays before help arrives. The
fear of falling and being unable to get help is a reason many enter nursing care. Older
adults at risk for cognitive decline (e.g., dementia) could live independently longer with
sensing systems that help caregivers monitor their well-being. Beyond aging-in-place,
these technologies have application in hospitals; smart-building systems for automation and
energy efficiency; security systems; retail analytics; and generally for context- and location-
aware computing applications. Existing technologies use (1) wearable sensors, which are often forgotten,
(2) video camera surveillance, which is seen as too invasive of privacy, or (3) infrared motion sensors,
which do not detect falls and are prone to false alarms. In contrast, the proposed sensor does not
need to be worn, reliably senses falls, and is privacy-preserving. Our sensor provides
capabilities currently unavailable, and will be bought by aging-in-place monitoring and
system integrator companies.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 486.91K | Year: 2013

The innovation of this SBIR Phase II project is the development and commercialization of a low-cost through-building surveillance product for police and SWAT teams that locates and tracks people across an entire building using a network of wireless sensors deployed around the outside of the building. Unlike other through-single-wall imaging technologies, a device does not need to be held against a wall. This project will develop new technologies that make the system useful for police team end-users to quickly deploy and use without extensive training. Specifically, the produce should investigate methods to achieve robust connectivity across larger buildings; develop capabilities for 2.5-dimensional (x,y + floor) imaging and tracking; develop adaptive estimation algorithms that automatically adjust to the environment; develop devices suited for rapid deployment, and develop a real-time commercial prototype including user interface. At the end of the project, the combination of these developments should allow delivery of a prototype to a SWAT team for them to deploy and use on their own in a training exercise.

The broader/commercial impact is the commercialization of a technology for police and SWAT (special weapons and tactics) teams to quickly obtain situational intelligence that will save lives. Lives are lost every year because law enforcement officers do not know what is happening inside a building prior to entering. In addition, other life-saving applications will benefit from technologies developed, for example: military urban operations; building security and homeland security systems; finding people alive in collapsed buildings or during fire rescue; and worker safety systems. The firms technology is also useful in systems that allow elderly to live longer in their own home by monitoring their activities to ensure their safety and health. The proposed solution to these challenges is uniquely useful because it does not require a person to wear or carry any device, and cannot image a persons face or features, thus preserving privacy. The technology is capable of seeing through walls, even in the dark or through smoke. These features make it compelling for indoor and outdoor security systems, in-home monitoring systems, smart building energy-conservation systems, and other context-aware computing systems. This project develops technologies for a new sensing modality with many compelling applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant This proposal investigates the use of a novel passive personal monitoring system to stem the tide in the epidemic of deaths due to unintentional opioid drug overdoses In the U S in opioid drug overdoses including prescription pain relievers and heroin caused deaths a number that has increased dramatically over the past two decades A person who overdoses on an opioid drug can have their breathing slow and then stop during sleep leading to anorexic brain damage or death We propose PlusOne a non contact whole home breathing monitor that is always on and provides early detection of severe respiratory depression and sends an alert in time for intervention to prevent death The overall goal of this project is to develop a beta prototype and to validate the technology in human subject studies This validation will provide the foundation for early commercialization of a consumer respiratory monitor and provide the background for future clinical trials performed in Phase II in order to request FDA regulatory approval for a clinical device Currently at risk patients who live or sleep alone are at high risk for overdose death because periodic visits or monitoring is insufficient to detect an overdose soon enough to prevent death No other non contact breathing sensor or wearable sensor provides robust protection as people donandapos t plan an overdose and thus donandapos t plan to wear or position themselves to be monitored after an overdose PlusOne has been tested with bench studies and preliminary human subject studies The device has shown that it is accurate to within bpm compared to a current clinical standard capnograph and that it can monitor breathing across an entire home The steps outlined in this Phase I proposal will validate the feasibility of the technology through successful development and implementation of real time processing algorithms a human subject study performed on sleeping individuals with sleep conditions i e obstructive sleep apnea restless leg syndrome etc and month long deployments in the homes of healthy subjects Successful completion of these aims will provide verification and validation of the robustness of the solution we propose as well as the commercial viability for deployment in the homes of at risk individuals By initially targeting the market of patients in or recently in rehabilitation treatment we believe PlusOne can achieve a $ million annual revenue and decrease unintentional opioid drug overdose deaths by more than PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE In drug overdoses caused deaths in the US half were due to prescription medications including from prescription opioid medications Opioid drugs inhibit the bodyandapos s breathing processes causing respiration to be depressed or stop completely We will develop PlusOne a radio frequency based whole home non contact breathing monitor that sends alerts to caretakers or if a personandapos s breathing rate falls to a dangerously low level within the home providing an opportunity to save the personandapos s life


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will develop a revolutionary new sensor for aging-in-place and assisted living which uses a network of radio frequency (RF) transceivers as a sensor in a home to track a person?s location and detect falls. The sensor is contact-free, i.e., a person does not need to remember to wear it in order to be monitored. The system monitors links for changes in signal strength which indicate a person being near the line between two transceivers. Algorithms use the link information to infer the location of a person. With transceivers at two different heights, algorithms can distinguish whether a person is standing, sitting, or laying on the floor, and use the speed at which someone moves to the floor to detect a dangerous fall. Room-level tracking can also be used to look for unusual patterns which indicate physical or cognitive decline. This project will develop methods to minimize deployment time and expertise. It will develop novel algorithms that allow for a lower density of transceivers in the system, and still achieve room-level tracking and fall detection accuracy. Live demonstrations will be conducted with potential investors and customers. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the ability for the sensor to increase the ability of an elder to safely age-in-place in their preferred living environment, benefitting them and reducing the costs of nursing home care. Unfortunately, many older people fall each year, often when alone, resulting in long delays before help arrives. The fear of falling and being unable to get help is a reason many enter nursing care. Older adults at risk for cognitive decline (e.g., dementia) could live independently longer with sensing systems that help caregivers monitor their well-being. Beyond aging-in-place, these technologies have application in hospitals; smart-building systems for automation and energy efficiency; security systems; retail analytics; and generally for context- and location- aware computing applications. Existing technologies use (1) wearable sensors, which are often forgotten, (2) video camera surveillance, which is seen as too invasive of privacy, or (3) infrared motion sensors, which do not detect falls and are prone to false alarms. In contrast, the proposed sensor does not need to be worn, reliably senses falls, and is privacy-preserving. Our sensor provides capabilities currently unavailable, and will be bought by aging-in-place monitoring and system integrator companies.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will investigate the rapid deployment of wireless networks for the purpose of device-free localization (DFL) in tactical through-building surveillance applications. DFL locates people inside of a building using only simple radio devices deployed on the outside of the building. In a police or military operation, these devices are thrown or launched around the building, and then measure the received signal strength (RSS) between many pairs of devices. Within seconds of deployment, the DFL system shows a map tracking people and objects within the building. Such a system requires rapid deployment techniques and real-time operator-free network configuration. This project will advance the state-of-the-art in self-configuring and adaptive wireless networks. Methods for using reconfigurable antennas to direct the antenna pattern through the building regardless of how a sensor lands will be developed. For operator-free deployment, the network will have devices which self-localize, and learn the statistics of the particular radio channels to be measured. The combined results will show that tactically deployed wireless devices can be used to rapidly obtain intelligence regarding occupants before entering a dangerous building.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project are significant, as lives are lost every year because law enforcement officers do not know what is happening on the other side of a wall. If successful, this project will enable a product for police/SWAT and military special operations forces (SOF) which will save lives by providing actionable intelligence prior to entering a dangerous building. Existing radar technology for through-wall imaging is too expensive ($100k) for all but the most cost-insensitive applications. We plan a product that, because of its low cost, small size, and ease of use, will be standard equipment in police departments and in SOF teams. We will thus capture a portion of an $78 billion surveillance equipment market, which is growing at a 10-13% annual rate. Development of rapid deployment technologies for wireless networks will benefit a wide range of environmental monitoring and internet-of-things systems.

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