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Morgantown, WV, United States
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Morgantown, WV, United States

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News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Husson University announced today that WHSN 89.3 FM took first place at the College Media Association’s Pinnacle Awards. This prestigious national collegiate media organization recognized the station’s 2015 live broadcast of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Premature Burial” as the Best Radio Talk/Entertainment Show of the Year. “Our students and faculty are what make the annual “Tales of Mystery and Imagination” broadcast so successful,” says Mark Nason, manager of communications and internships at Husson University’s New England School of Communications (NESCom). “This award stands as a testament to the quality learning experience we make available to our students. With modern broadcast equipment and knowledgeable, experienced faculty members, NESCom’s radio production program is regarded by many as the best in Maine.” The College Media Association’s (CMA) Pinnacle Awards honor the best college media organizations and individual work. The contest is open to student work produced by any college media organization during an academic year. The awards, presented at the Fall National College Media Convention, recognize achievements by college TV and radio stations, online media outlets, magazines, newspapers and yearbooks. In winning this first place award, WHSN 89.3 FM prevailed over similar programs at much larger universities. Second place went to West Virginia University’s (WVU) “Moose in the Morning.” The Fall 2015 enrollment at WVU’s main campus is 28,776. Fall 2015 WVU System enrollment is 31,514. Third place went to WZIS-FM at Indiana State University (ISU). Total enrollment at ISU during the fall of 2015 was 13,584 students. Husson University, by comparison, is much smaller. Fall 2015 enrollment at Husson was 3,420 students. Husson continues to grow. In Fall 2016, Husson University enrollment was 3,682. “Our radio program is just as good, if not better, than those at larger colleges and universities,” continued Nason. “The individual attention NESCom students get as part of their education is one of the reasons why so many of our graduates go on to achieve career success after graduation.” The live radio broadcast of Poe’s “The Premature Burial” was performed as a live 1940’s-style radio drama from the stage of the Gracie Theatre. It featured a cast of Husson University students and local area residents. Members of the audience got to see everything that goes into the creation of a live radio drama – including the terrifying sound effects. “The Premature Burial” by Edgar Allan Poe is about a man who randomly falls into a death-like trance. As a result of this condition, he’s afraid that he’ll be mistakenly declared dead and subsequently buried alive. He becomes obsessed by this fear. To protect himself, he refuses to leave his home and builds an elaborate burial chamber with equipment that will allow him to signal for help in case he finds himself entombed accidentally. Then, one day, he awakens in pitch darkness in a confined area. Despite his precautions, was he buried alive? In past years, “Tales of Mystery and Imagination” has received accolades and recognition from a variety of organizations. Recognition for past productions includes: “The Cask of Amontillado” 2011 – Broadcast Education Association (BEA) Festival of Media Arts - Honorable Mention Student Audio Comedy or Drama category “The Fall of the House of Usher” 2012 - BEA Festival of Media Arts - First Place Student Audio Comedy or Drama category 2013 - College Media Association Pinnacle Awards - Finalist - Best Radio Talk/Entertainment Program “The Masque of the Red Death” and “The Pit and the Pendulum” 2013 - Maine Association of Broadcasters - Second Place Locally Produced Program category “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” 2014 - College Media Association Pinnacle Awards - First Place - Best Radio Talk/Entertainment Program 2014 - BEA Festival of Media Arts - First Place Student Audio Comedy or Drama category 2014 – College Broadcasters, Inc. (CBI) National Student Production Awards - Finalist Best Special Broadcast 2014 - Maine Association of Broadcasters -Third Place Locally Produced Program category In reflecting on the success of the live radio show, Husson University Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Dr. Lynne Coy-Ogan remarked, “Members of the public and our campus community who attend these live broadcast have seen, first hand, why the New England School of Communications at Husson University is regarded as one of the region’s leading educators of media professionals. The professional quality of our students and the broadcast is impressive.” Completed in October of 2009, the Gracie Theatre is Husson University's center for the fine and performing arts. This beautiful new 500-seat theatre is quickly earning a reputation as one of Maine’s premier performance venues. In addition, The Gracie also serves as a learning platform for students from the New England School of Communications in digital audio, sound mixing, set design and construction, lighting, acting and electronics. For more information, visit GracieTheatre.com The New England School of Communications (NESCom) at Husson University offers Bachelor of Science degrees in communications technology, mass communications, and entertainment production. Within these degrees, students may choose from concentrations in audio engineering, live sound technology, video production, web media, entertainment production, journalism, marketing communications, radio broadcasting, and sports journalism. NESCom specializes in communications and provides students with a hands-on experience that gives them the education and skills needed for today's job market. For more than 100 years, Husson University has prepared future leaders to handle the challenges of tomorrow through innovative undergraduate and graduate degrees. With a commitment to delivering affordable classroom, online and experiential learning opportunities, Husson University has come to represent superior value in higher education. Our Bangor campus and off-campus satellite education centers in Southern Maine, Wells and Northern Maine provide advanced knowledge in business; health and education; pharmacy studies, science and humanities; as well as communication. In addition, Husson University has a robust adult learning program. For more information about educational opportunities that can lead to personal and professional success, visit Husson.edu.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ARLINGTON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Four major health systems, including Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center (Conn.), Singing River Health System (Miss.), SLUCare Physician Group (Mo.) and WVU Medicine (W. Va.), went live with Surescripts National Record Locator Service (NRLS) to equip providers with fast and easy access to clinical records for 230 million patients and four billion nationwide patient visit locations. This latest expansion comes on the heels of recent deployments of Surescripts NRLS across eight large health systems. NRLS now reaches patients in all 50 states and is live in 10 major metropolitan areas, including Charlotte, N.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, St. Louis and Portland, Ore. “As consumers of healthcare, patients are demanding a more connected healthcare experience,” said Tom Skelton, Chief Executive Officer of Surescripts. “Our goal is to accelerate provider adoption of critical data-sharing technologies to increase patient safety, lower costs and ensure quality care. With Surescripts National Record Locator Service, these healthcare organizations have access to actionable patient intelligence, and can make faster and better decisions to ultimately improve patient care.” As part of the Carequality framework, NRLS automatically queries Carequality implementer locations, allowing providers to electronically share data across technology platforms and networks. By enabling access to critical patient health information within existing electronic health record (EHR) workflows, providers can easily identify and share patient records across disparate systems and geographies to focus more time on delivering quality patient care. With this latest expansion of NRLS, thousands of healthcare providers across the country are harnessing the ability to identify previous care locations, share and retrieve nationwide clinical records and effectively get a more complete picture of patients’ medical histories. The health systems that are now enabled for NRLS to provide care to thousands of patients, including: “Since deploying Surescripts National Record Locator Service in January, our care teams are already seeing the benefits of having real-time access to valuable clinical information, no matter where a patient previously received treatment,” said C. Steven Wolf, M.D., Chairman of Emergency Medicine at Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center. “We look forward to continuing to harness the benefits of NRLS to ensure that our patients receive top-quality care, in every circumstance.” NRLS meets the demands of patients seeking a more connected healthcare experience, as evidenced by their responses to Surescripts’ 2016 Connected Care and the Patient Experience survey. The survey revealed that: For more information on Surescripts National Record Locator Service, please visit Surescripts Booth #6660 or the Interoperability Showcase at the 2017 HIMSS Annual Conference & Exhibition in Orlando, Fla., Feb. 19-23 or click here. About Surescripts Our purpose is to serve the nation with the single most trusted and capable health information network. Since 2001, Surescripts has led the movement to turn health data into actionable intelligence to increase patient safety, lower costs and ensure quality care. Visit us at www.surescripts.com and follow us at twitter.com/surescripts.


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

For the first time, researchers at West Virginia University (WVU) have directly measured the complicated 3D patterns of flowing plasma as it strikes the walls of fusion and space propulsion devices. Understanding how this process occurs, and how scientists and engineers can prevent it, is critical to the development of the next generation of energy and space exploration technologies. The measurements performed at WVU in a "helicon" plasma are the first ever 3D ion flow fields mapped in a volume. The measurements show how plasmas in fusion tokamak devices and Hall thruster spacecraft engines accelerate parallel to the wall prior to impact. This causes the walls of these devices to erode more rapidly than previously thought, limiting their lifetimes. This flow is surprising because it is not predicted in theoretical models. The researchers are currently investigating the reasons for this behavior, looking at aspects of the plasma that were assumed to be unimportant in previous models. These results, including the first fully 3D flow measurements (Figure 1), will be presented at the 2016 American Physical Society - Division of Plasma Physics meeting in San Jose, Oct. 31 to Nov. 4. "These measurements have already yielded surprising insights into plasma behavior near walls," said Derek Thompson, who took the measurements with Miguel Hernandez and Umair Siddiqui in the research laboratory of Earl Scime at West Virginia University. Comparison of 3D ion velocity distribution measurements and models in the vicinity of an absorbing boundary oriented obliquely to a magnetic fieldThursday, November 3, 2016, Room: Exhibit Hall 1


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

For the first time, researchers at West Virginia University (WVU) have directly measured the complicated 3D patterns of flowing plasma as it strikes the walls of fusion and space propulsion devices. Understanding how this process occurs, and how scientists and engineers can prevent it, is critical to the development of the next generation of energy and space exploration technologies. The measurements performed at WVU in a "helicon" plasma are the first ever 3D ion flow fields mapped in a volume. The measurements show how plasmas in fusion tokamak devices and Hall thruster spacecraft engines accelerate parallel to the wall prior to impact. This causes the walls of these devices to erode more rapidly than previously thought, limiting their lifetimes. This flow is surprising because it is not predicted in theoretical models. The researchers are currently investigating the reasons for this behavior, looking at aspects of the plasma that were assumed to be unimportant in previous models. These results, including the first fully 3D flow measurements, will be presented at the 2016 American Physical Society -- Division of Plasma Physics meeting in San Jose, Oct. 31 to Nov. 4. "These measurements have already yielded surprising insights into plasma behavior near walls," said Derek Thompson, who took the measurements with Miguel Hernandez and Umair Siddiqui in the research laboratory of Earl Scime at West Virginia University.


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: phys.org

Understanding how this process occurs, and how scientists and engineers can prevent it, is critical to the development of the next generation of energy and space exploration technologies. The measurements performed at WVU in a "helicon" plasma are the first ever 3D ion flow fields mapped in a volume. The measurements show how plasmas in fusion tokamak devices and Hall thruster spacecraft engines accelerate parallel to the wall prior to impact. This causes the walls of these devices to erode more rapidly than previously thought, limiting their lifetimes. This flow is surprising because it is not predicted in theoretical models. The researchers are currently investigating the reasons for this behavior, looking at aspects of the plasma that were assumed to be unimportant in previous models. These results, including the first fully 3D flow measurements (Figure 1), will be presented at the 2016 American Physical Society - Division of Plasma Physics meeting in San Jose, Oct. 31 to Nov. 4. "These measurements have already yielded surprising insights into plasma behavior near walls," said Derek Thompson, who took the measurements with Miguel Hernandez and Umair Siddiqui in the research laboratory of Earl Scime at West Virginia University.


News Article | March 15, 2016
Site: phys.org

Case Western Reserve University, Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University are forming the Tri-State University Energy Alliance. The universities have agreed to work more closely to align their individual and collective expertise for research, technology commercialization, partnerships with industry and more. "We're committed to working together to enhance the region's resources towards energy innovation," said Alexis Abramson, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the Great Lakes Energy Institute at Case Western Reserve. "In so doing, we look to create a stronger regional energy ecosystem." The universities have overlapping areas of energy research, such as grid modernization, energy storage and oil and gas; taking advantage of a regional cooperation in these areas has the potential to lead to a formidable impact. The Great Lakes Energy Institute at Case Western Reserve has a strong history in electrochemistry and materials applied to energy storage and growing expertise in data analytics used to explore the lifetime and reliability of energy technologies. Faculty and university partners also are actively engaged in developing a "living laboratory" to address grid modernization challenges. The University of Pittsburgh Center for Energy is dedicated to improving energy technology development and implementation including work in the areas of energy and electric power delivery, reliability, and security; energy efficiency and sustainability; advanced materials for demanding energy applications; clean energy development and integration; carbon management and utilization; direct energy conversion and recovery; unconventional gas resources; and energy workforce development. The Wilton E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University, launched in 2012 as a university-wide research initiative, focuses on five strategic areas: pathways to a low-carbon future, smart grid, new materials for energy, shale gas, and building energy efficiency. The Scott Institute's holistic approach to research and development—across technology, policy, integrated systems and behavioral science—facilitates identification of real-world solutions for energy problems. West Virginia University has over 120 faculty members performing research in collaboration with the WVU Energy Institute, focusing on fossil energy, sustainable energy, environmental stewardship, and energy policy. At WVU, the Marcellus Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory; the Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines and Emissions; and the US-China Clean Energy Research Center - Advanced Coal Technology Consortium; are three examples of federal-academic-industrial partnerships progressing the state-of-the-art in energy technologies. Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto announced the alliance at noon today during Carnegie Mellon's Energy Week. Peduto addressed students, faculty and representatives from business and industry, government and non-governmental agencies and the public. Alliance members will regularly discuss energy initiatives and activities, collaboration opportunities and enable faculty, research staff and students from the four universities to connect. During the next six months, members will more specifically define the scope of alliance activities. Progress and opportunities will be reviewed and discussed regularly and at annual meetings. Explore further: New energy innovation report highlights central role of emerging economies


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

As magnetically confined plasmas progress towards ignition and very long pulse experiments, the physics of the pedestal and divertor regions has become increasingly important. There is a critical need for comprehensive measurements in boundary layer plasmas and the importance of such measurements to the improvement of predictive numerical simulations. The focus of this proposal is the direct, spatially resolved, measurement of the energy spectra of ions in the edge of a plasma using in-situ probes that are easily replaced and require minimal resources. This will be accomplished by the development of a Micro Scale Ion Spectrometer. In the Phase I research, a proof of concept device will be fabricated and tested. This device will be constructed of sensing elements of the same size as a fully functional device and hence provide a very high degree of confidence in the applicability of this instrument. The benefits of a successful completion of Phase I and Phase II are significant in that the resulting sensor and instrument of a new Micro Ion Spectrometer which will exhibit extremely small size and low power consumption and which can be positioned and manipulated easily inside sealed chambers such as plasma and related vacuum process chambers. The MIS sensor has the potential to play a useful role in fundamental physic plasma research such as in fusion plasma devices and in the broader community of plasma physics and chemistry research at national research laboratories, private industry, and universities. The extended commercial applications include the gamut of plasma processes as used in semiconductor manufacturing technologies. It is thought that all plasma processing equipment are a potential site for on-board OEM packages of the MIS that could fulfill the need for real time in-situ plasma sensing. Future developments of the sensor will be that of a Micro Mass Spectrometer. The extension to semiconductor device processing will help create semiconductor structures that will lead to new and novel devices. In space based applications, such as being a part of the instrumentation package for CubeSats and other micro-satellites, the new device can be used to yield new information about energetic charged particles ion the heliosphere and magnetosphere and thereby support the expanding field of space weather research. Early warnings of space weather events are critically needed for space-based communications infrastructure and ground-based electrical distribution networks.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Yeast's ability to grow, divide, age and metabolize food is similar to human cells and provides researchers with a nearly perfect specimen to study cell processes and genetic variation. Biologist Jennifer Gallagher is taking advantage of the organism's functions to examine how an individual would respond to stress at a molecular level, and the effects herbicides such as the common household weedkiller RoundUp, have on genes. "Because we all have the same ancestor, as life diversified, the same biochemical pathways were just elaborated on," said Gallagher an assistant professor of biology at West Virginia University. "You can take most of the human genes and put them in yeast and they will function." To understand how individual's respond to stress, Gallagher is looking at small variations in the genetic makeup that could explain why people have different reactions to stress. Gallagher is also looking at genes that could are regulating the response to herbicides, such as RoundUp. In 2015, an international agency declared glyphosate, the primary ingredient in the popular product, a "probable human carcinogen." "RoundUp is not toxic to people in acute doses," said Gallagher. In plants and yeast, it inhibits a pathway that humans don't have. Gallagher says that by studying yeast, we can determine whether there are other pathways for RoundUp to affect humans. Gallagher has received a $250,000, two-year grant from the National Science Foundation to study genetically diverse strains of yeast collected from all over the world and different types of environments. The grant will also fund an outreach partnership with the WVU Earl L. Core Arboretum called, "Information Acquired by Students who Know West Virginia Has Yeast," or I ASK WHY. Forty years ago, there was no human resistance to -- or ability to withstand the effects of RoundUp, Gallagher said. Gallagher plans to pinpoint the cause behind organisms' ability to adapt to herbicide exposure. Yeast, she added, can be preserved for decades, allowing Gallagher's research team to compare the effects of RoundUp on yeast from one hundred years ago compared to now. "If you are trying to develop a treatment, you can't do so by studying one patient, and that's essentially what the field has been doing," said Gallagher. "We can get a bigger picture by studying these other strains and it will help develop the tools that we need for our research."


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Beckley, West Virginia, Nov. 01, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Advanced Advertising, Inc. is a breakthrough marketing company headquartered in Beckley, West Virginia. Lead by Director of Operations and former Mountaineer Linebacker Isaiah Bruce, the company was founded on competition, athleticism and teamwork. “When we explain that Advanced Advertising, Inc. was found on athleticism, we don’t mean our associates need to run a 4.5 40 yard dash in order to be qualified. We mean they must be agile in order to make quick decisions that are best for our clients and our business. We mean they must have leadership qualities in order to train and develop the next generation of our team. We mean they must have a sense of team spirit and the ability to create a positive environment within the office,” says Isaiah. Isaiah graduated from West Virginia University with a bachelor’s degree in business management. During his time at WVU, he was part of two championship wins for the Mountaineer football team, first as a freshman in 2011 and again as a senior in 2015. Upon graduation, Isaiah found his nitch in sales and marketing. “A lot of what I learned on the field I could translate to business,” he explains. “It almost seemed like every entry level position out there required at least two years of work experience. Then it hit me. Create the opportunity.” Isaiah combined agility, leadership and team spirit to produce an unparalleled business opportunity. Advanced Advertising, Inc. represents some of the biggest brands in the nation. Their goal is to continue growing their client’s footprint, and in doing so, expand the business. The best part, as explained by Isaiah, is that no experience or previous training is necessary. “We are willing to provide training in order to develop our associates to the leadership and executive positions. Our clients are projected to grow at an extraordinarily fast rate moving into the fourth quarter. We have to produce leaders to manage the brand just as quickly.” For more information about the career opportunities offered at Advanced Advertising, Inc., visit www.AdvancedAdvertisingInc.com.


News Article | September 11, 2016
Site: phys.org

The prize was awarded last week at Worchester Polytechnic Institute in Worchester, Massachusetts. WVU's Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources says in a news release that the 10 students earned the most points by successfully navigating a robot to win the Level 2 competition for the Sample Robot Return Challenge as part of NASA's Centennial Challenges. It marked the end of five years of competitions that started in 2012. In the latest challenge, seven teams had to retrieve up to 10 samples. To qualify for the event, teams had to complete a first level in which a single sample had to be returned in 30 minutes.

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