Wuhan Mental Health Center

Hugang, China

Wuhan Mental Health Center

Hugang, China
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Luo Y.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Wang J.,Wuhan Mental Health Center | Wu H.R.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Zhu D.M.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Zhang Y.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology
Neural Regeneration Research | Year: 2013

Although plasticity in the neural system underlies working memory, and working memory can be improved by training, there is thus far no evidence that children with developmental dyslexia can benefit from working-memory training. In the present study, thirty dyslexic children aged 8-11 years were recruited from an elementary school in Wuhan, China. They received working-memory training, including training in visuospatial memory, verbal memory, and central executive tasks. The difficulty of the tasks was adjusted based on the performance of each subject, and the training sessions lasted 40 minutes per day, for 5 weeks. The results showed that working-memory training significantly enhanced performance on the nontrained working memory tasks such as the visuospatial, the verbal domains, and central executive tasks in children with developmental dyslexia. More importantly, the visual rhyming task and reading fluency task were also significantly improved by training. Progress on working memory measures was related to changes in reading skills. These experimental findings indicate that working memory is a pivotal factor in reading development among children with developmental dyslexia, and interventions to improve working memory may help dyslexic children to become more proficient in reading.


Ou J.-J.,Central South University | Xu Y.,Zhejiang University | Chen H.-H.,Wuhan Mental Health Center | Fan X.,University of Massachusetts Medical School | And 6 more authors.
Psychopharmacology | Year: 2013

Objective: The objective of the study was to compare metabolic effects of ziprasidone versus olanzapine treatment in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Methods: In this 6-week, multicenter, open-label trial, 260 patients were randomly assigned to receive ziprasidone or olanzapine treatment (130 per group). Primary metabolic measures were changes in weight and body mass index (BMI). Secondary metabolic measures were changes in glucose, insulin, lipids, and blood pressure. Efficacy and safety were also measured additionally. Results: A total number of 230 patients completed the study. The mean daily dosages were 138.2(28.6) mg for ziprasidone and 19.0(2.3) mg for olanzapine. After 6-week treatment, there were significant between-group differences in change scores on weight [4.22(3.49) kg versus -0.84(2.04) kg, p < 0.001] and BMI [1.59(1.37) versus -0.30(0.74), p < 0.001]. In addition, there were significant between-group differences in change scores on fasting plasma glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment 2-insulin resistance, low-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, and triglycerides (p < 0.001); all the changes were clinically in favor of ziprasidone treatment. Both medications were effective in improving schizophrenia symptoms, but the decreases in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total scores of the olanzapine group were significantly greater than that of the ziprasidone group (p < 0.05). Compared with olanzapine, ziprasidone also induced more prolonging of corrected QT interval and extrapyramidal side effects (p < 0.05). Both medications were well tolerated, and no serious adverse events were observed in either group. Conclusions: Compared with olanzapine, ziprasidone treatment was associated with less adverse effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Guo X.,Central South University | Zhai J.,Jining Medical College | Wei Q.,Sun Yat Sen University | Twamley E.W.,University of California at San Diego | And 4 more authors.
Neuroscience Letters | Year: 2011

The study aimed to assess the cognitive effects of first- and second-generation antipsychotics on neurocognition under naturalistic treatment conditions. In a 12-month, open-label, multicenter study, 698 patients with early-stage schizophrenia (duration of illness ≤5 years) were prescribed chlorpromazine, sulpiride, clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or aripiprazole monotherapy. A neuropsychological battery including tests of attention, processing speed, learning/memory, and executive functioning was administered at baseline, 6- and 12-months. The primary outcome was change in a cognitive composite score after 12-months of treatment. At 12 months, treatment resulted in mild to moderate neurocognitive improvements of z=0.32 for chlorpromazine, 0.33 for sulpiride, 0.43 for clozapine, 0.51 for risperidone, 0.69 for olanzapine, 0.64 for quetiapine and 0.46 for aripiprazole. However, the olanzapine and quetiapine groups demonstrated greater improvement in the composite score and processing speed than did the chlorpromazine and sulpiride groups. Both first- and second-generation antipsychotics may improve cognitive function in patients with early-stage schizophrenia. Given that some neurocognitive improvement is attributable to a practice effect, any improvement is likely to be in the range of a small effect size. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Ou J.-J.,Central South University | Xun G.-L.,Central South University | Wu R.-R.,Central South University | Li L.-H.,Central South University | And 8 more authors.
Psychopharmacology | Year: 2011

Rationale: S-citalopram (escitalopram) is the very active moiety of citalopram. It has been shown in many studies to be an effective and safe antidepressant for treating major depressive disorder (MDD). Objective: The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of escitalopram vs citalopram in Chinese MDD patients. Methods: In the double-blind study, 240 MDD patients were randomly assigned to treatment for 6 weeks either with escitalopram (10-20 mg/d) or citalopram (20-40 mg/d). The primary efficacy measurement was the change of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) total score from baseline to the end of study. The secondary efficacy measurements were response and remission rates. The adverse events (AEs) were recorded by the investigator. Results: Two hundred and three (85%) patients completed the trial. The average dose was 13.9 mg/d in the escitalopram group and 27.6 mg/d in the citalopram group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in the change in HAMD-17 total score, response, and remission rate. These results were similar in severe MDD patients. No significant differences were found between the two groups in AEs. No serious AEs were observed in this study. Conclusions: The study suggests that escitalopram 10-20 mg/d are as effective and safe as citalopram 20-40 mg/d in the short-term treatment for Chinese MDD patients. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


PubMed | Ningbo Kang Ning Hospital, King Abdulaziz University, Hebei Medical University, Kangning Hospital and 36 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Current biology : CB | Year: 2015

Adversity, particularly in early life, can cause illness. Clues to the responsible mechanisms may lie with the discovery of molecular signatures of stress, some of which include alterations to an individuals somatic genome. Here, using genome sequences from 11,670 women, we observed a highly significant association between a stress-related disease, major depression, and the amount of mtDNA (p = 9.00 10(-42), odds ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29-1.37]) and telomere length (p = 2.84 10(-14), odds ratio 0.85 [95% CI = 0.81-0.89]). While both telomere length and mtDNA amount were associated with adverse life events, conditional regression analyses showed the molecular changes were contingent on the depressed state. We tested this hypothesis with experiments in mice, demonstrating that stress causes both molecular changes, which are partly reversible and can be elicited by the administration of corticosterone. Together, these results demonstrate that changes in the amount of mtDNA and telomere length are consequences of stress and entering a depressed state. These findings identify increased amounts of mtDNA as a molecular marker of MD and have important implications for understanding how stress causes the disease.


She P.,Hubei University | Zeng H.,Wuhan Mental Health Center | Yang B.,Hubei University
Journal of Psychiatric Research | Year: 2016

Objective: The aim of the study was to explore the efficacy of structural group therapy on the self-consistency and congruence of inpatient adolescents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Method: Sixty inpatient adolescents with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). The intervention group was provided with a 12-session structural group therapy program for six weeks (1 h, two times per week), while the control group participated in a handicraft group. All patients were assessed with the Self-Consistency and Congruence Scale (SCCS) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at pretest, posttest, three-month and one-year follow-up. The results were analyzed using t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. Findings: The two groups had no significant difference at the pre-test of outcome measures (p > 0.05). Significant differences existed between the two groups in ego-dystonic, self-flexibility, SCCS scores, positive syndrome, general psychopathology and PANSS scores after the intervention (p < 0.05). At the three-month follow-up, ego-dystonic, self-flexibility and PANSS scores were also found to be significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). But the outcome measures were not significantly different between the two groups at the one-year follow-up. Conclusion: Structural group therapy in a mental health setting had a positive effect on improving self-consistency and congruence, positive symptoms and general psychopathology of inpatient adolescents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Hubei University and Wuhan Mental Health Center
Type: | Journal: Journal of psychiatric research | Year: 2016

The aim of the study was to explore the efficacy of structural group therapy on the self-consistency and congruence of inpatient adolescents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia.Sixty inpatient adolescents with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). The intervention group was provided with a 12-session structural group therapy program for six weeks (1 h, two times per week), while the control group participated in a handicraft group. All patients were assessed with the Self-Consistency and Congruence Scale (SCCS) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at pretest, posttest, three-month and one-year follow-up. The results were analyzed using t-test and repeated measures ANOVA.The two groups had no significant difference at the pre-test of outcome measures (p > 0.05). Significant differences existed between the two groups in ego-dystonic, self-flexibility, SCCS scores, positive syndrome, general psychopathology and PANSS scores after the intervention (p < 0.05). At the three-month follow-up, ego-dystonic, self-flexibility and PANSS scores were also found to be significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). But the outcome measures were not significantly different between the two groups at the one-year follow-up.Structural group therapy in a mental health setting had a positive effect on improving self-consistency and congruence, positive symptoms and general psychopathology of inpatient adolescents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia.


PubMed | Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, Wuhan Mental Health Center and Huazhong University of Science and Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Atypical antipsychotics such as olanzapine cause metabolic side effects leading to obesity and insulin resistance. The underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study we investigated the effects of chronic treatment of olanzapine on the fatty acid composition of plasma in mice.Twenty 8-week female Balb/c mice were randomly assigned to two groups: the OLA group and the control group. After treatment with olanzapine (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle intraperitoneally for 8 weeks, fasting glucose, insulin levels and oral glucose tolerance test were determined. Effects on plasma fatty acid profile and plasma indices of D5 desaturase, D6 desaturase and SCD1 activity were also investigated.Chronic administration of olanzapine significantly elevated fasting glucose and insulin levels, impaired glucose tolerance, but did not increase body weight. Total saturated fatty acids and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids were significantly increased and total monounsaturated fatty acids were significantly decreased, while total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids showed no prominent changes. Chronic olanzapine treatment significantly up-regulated D6 desaturase activity while down-regulating D5 desaturase activity. Palmitic acid (C16:0), dihomo--linolenic acid (C20:3n-6) and D6 desaturase were associated with an increase probability of insulin resistance, whereas nervonic acid (C24:1) and SCD1 were significantly associated with a lower insulin resistance probability.All results indicated that such drug-induced effects on fatty acid profile in plasma were relevant for the metabolic adverse effects associated with olanzapine and possibly other antipsychotics. Further studies are needed to investigate geneticand other mechanisms to explain how plasma fatty acids regulate glucose metabolism and affect the risk of insulin resistance.


PubMed | Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Jining Medical University and Wuhan Mental Health Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Experimental and therapeutic medicine | Year: 2015

The incidence of depression increases annually but the pathogenesis is not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to explore the expression and interaction of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in chronic stress-induced depressive rats. A total of 20 adult healthy Sprague Dawley rats (180-220 g) were randomly divided into the control and experimental depression groups. The depression model was established with a chronic stress method, and the success of model construction was assessed through weigh measurements and the sugar consumption and open-field tests. The expression of TNF- and VEGF was detected using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Compared with the control group, the weight of the rats in the experimental group was found to be reduced (P<0.05). The open-field test showed significant differences in the horizontal and vertical motion of the rats between the two groups, and the rats in the experimental group exhibited a significantly reduced ability to adapt to a new environment (P<0.05). Furthermore, the sensitivity of the rats in the experimental group to reward stimulation was decreased. The relative mRNA expression levels of TNF- and VEGF in the hippocampus of the experimental group were lower than those in the control group, and western blot analysis revealed that the protein expression of VEGF and TNF- was reduced in the experimental group. Neurons of the experimental group exhibited reduced immunohistochemical staining compared with neurons from the normal hippocampus in the control group. In conclusion, the present study investigated the association between the occurrence of depression and TNF- and VEGF at the mRNA and protein levels using RT-qPCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry and animal behavior experiments. The results provide a fundamental basis for follow-up clinical research.

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