Dayton, OH, United States
Dayton, OH, United States

Wright State University is a public research university in Fairborn, Ohio, located just outside of Dayton near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and Beavercreek. The university offers degrees at the associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral levels. A branch campus is located at Grand Lake St. Marys State Park southeast of Celina, Ohio. As of 2014, the university had more than 17,000 students enrolled. Wikipedia.


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Zhang X.,Wright State University
IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control | Year: 2011

This technical note presents a sensor fault detection and isolation scheme for a class of Lipschitz nonlinear systems with unstructured modeling uncertainty. It significantly extends previous results by considering a class of system nonlinearities which are modeled as functions of the system input and partially measurable state variables. A new sensor fault diagnosis method is developed using adaptive estimation techniques. Adaptive thresholds for fault detection and isolation are derived, and several important properties are investigated, including robustness, stability and learning capability, and fault isolability. A robotic example is used to show the effectiveness of the method. © 2011 IEEE.


Gomez-Cambronero J.,Wright State University
Advances in Biological Regulation | Year: 2014

Phospholipase D (PLD) is a membrane protein with a double role: maintenance of the structural integrity of cellular or intracellular membranes and involvement in cell signaling through the product of the catalytic reaction, PA, and through protein-protein interaction with a variety of partners. Cross-talk during PLD signaling occurs with other cancer regulators (Ras, PDGF, TGF and kinases). Elevation of either PLD1 or PLD2 (the two mammalian isoforms of PLD) is able to transform fibroblasts and contribute to cancer progression. Elevated total PLD activity, as well as overexpression, is present in a wide variety of cancers such as gastric, colorectal, renal, stomach, esophagus, lung and breast. PLD provides survival signals and is involved in migration, adhesion and invasion of cancer cells, and all are increased during PLD upregulation or, conversely, they are decreased during PLD loss of function. Eventhough the end results of PLD action as relates to downstream signaling mechanisms are still currently being elucidated, invasion, a pre-requisite for metastasis, is directly affected by PLD. This review will introduce the classical mammalian PLD's, PLD1 and PLD2, followed by the mechanisms of intracellular regulation and a status of current investigation in the crucial involvement of PLD in cancer, mostly through its role in cell migration, invasion and metastasis, that has grown exponentially in the last few years. © 2013 The Author.


Patent
Wright State University | Date: 2016-02-03

Systems, methods, and other embodiments associated with clear nesting material for animals. According to one embodiment, the clear nesting material comprises a clear polymer material such that an animal inside of a nest constructed of the clear nesting material is visible.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.82K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: Temperature and magnetic field dependent terahertz spectroscopies have proven useful for characterizing novel electronic and magnetic materials. To this end, we are developing a turn-key, continuous-wave (CW) terahertz transmission platform operating from 5 K to 300 K with fields up to 9 T. Fiber-coupled photoconductive switches operate from 200 GHz to 1.2 THz in the cryogenic and high-field sample environment -- eliminating the need to align a THz beam through multiple cryostat windows. In Phase I, first generation prototype hardware demonstrated the promise of this approach especially for characterization of thin-film electronic materials. This proposal focuses on finalizing development, application, validation, and software integration of the experimental methods and physical models that ultimately form the heart of a commercial THz material characterization system. In this work, the accuracy of material parameter extraction algorithms will be improved with the development of a calibration procedure specific to this experimental platform. Upgrades to first generation hardware, including a more phase-stable CW-THz spectrometer, will improve the efficiency and reliability of signal acquisition. Finally, the hardware, calibration and material property extraction algorithms will be validated through a series of Hall and CW-THz characterization measurements on conductive ZnO thin films.; BENEFIT: This system will be an affordable, compact, convenient-to-use measurement platform focused on the characterization needs of researchers of novel electronic and magnetic materials. As a turnkey solution conditioned with the necessary cryogenic/ magnetic sample environment and application-specific software, scientist users who are not necessarily optics and THz experts can rapidly begin productive and illuminating material characterization work. THz characterization is expected to help reveal new properties of materials being studied for high speed semiconductor, THz sensors, photovoltaics, organic electronics, and spintronics applications, as well as chemical/biological threat detection.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SPECIAL PROJECTS - CISE | Award Amount: 941.10K | Year: 2015

As social media permeates our daily life, there has been a sharp rise in the use of social media to humiliate, bully, and threaten others, which has come with harmful consequences such as emotional distress, depression, and suicide. The October 2014 Pew Research survey shows that 73% of adult Internet users have observed online harassment and 40% have experienced it. The prevalence and serious consequences of online harassment present both social and technological challenges. This project identifies harassing messages in social media, through a combination of text analysis and the use of other clues in the social media (e.g., indications of power relationships between sender and receiver of a potentially harassing message.) The project will develop prototypes to detect harassing messages in Twitter; the proposed techniques can be adapted to other platforms, such as Facebook, online forums, and blogs. An interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, social scientists, urban and public affairs professionals, educators, and the participation of college and high schools students in the research will ensure wide impact of scientific research on the support for safe social interactions.

This project combines social science theory and human judgment of potential harassment examples from social media, in both school and workplace contexts, to operationalize the detection of harassing messages and offenders. It develops comprehensive and reliable context-aware techniques (using machine learning, text mining, natural language processing, and social network analysis) to glean information about the people involved and their interconnected network of relationships, and to determine and evaluate potential harassment and harassers. The key innovations of this work include: (1) identification of the generic language of insult, characterized by profanities and other general patterns of verbal abuse, and recognition of target-dependent offensive language involving sensitive topics that are personal to a specific individual or social circle; (2) prediction of harassment-specific emotion evoked in a recipient after reading messages by leveraging conversation history as well as senders emotions; (3) recognition of a senders malicious intent behind messages based on the aspects of power, truth (approximated by trust), and familiarity; (4) a harmfulness assessment of harassing messages by fusing aforementioned language, emotion, and intent factors; and (5) detection of harassers from their aggregated behaviors, such as harassment frequency, duration, and coverage measures, for effective prevention and intervention.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 359.77K | Year: 2016

This CISE Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site award funds a new REU site focuses on cybersecurity at Wright State University. Each summer, students will work with experienced faculty mentors state-of-the-art facilities and emerging tools and techniques to solve problems that are timely and important. The challenges of cybersecurity research provide an exciting opportunity for students to investigate fundamental principles and strategies to develop real-world, secure systems that we can all trust. This project is co-funded by the Cyber Corps (R): Scholarship for Service Program.

The project is led by an outstanding team offering modern facilities and professional mentors to guide undergraduates in explorations of problems related to cybersecurity. The team will use proven strategies to recruit undergraduate students from groups traditionally under-represented in computer science. The team will also seek to include veterans who are returning to pursue computing degrees The students will participate in research and professional development activities all designed to achieve the goals of retaining and graduating undergraduate students in computer fields, recruiting students from groups traditionally under-represented in computing fields, developing students confidence and capabilities of conducting independent research, and motivating students to pursue graduate programs.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.96K | Year: 2015

In Phase I of this project MLPC, WSU, and AFIT were successfully able to identify several optical data features that are indicative of the quality of components built with the selective laser melting additive manufacturing process. Four unique optical sensors were identified to collect this information and they include infrared and visible wavelength high-speed cameras and spectrometers. The sensors used in Phase I were very expensive, university developed, and produce very big data sets. In this phase II proposal MLPC and their collaborators will continue this work by developing a new low-cost sensor system to specifically track key data features identified in Phase I. This sensor system will then be used to perform in-process quality monitoring and qualification of manufactured parts. In Phase II this analysis will also be extended to electron beam freeform fabrication. To complete the project MLPC, WSU, and AFIT will continue analysis of the Phase I sensor data to identify more obscure process quality data, and develop process maps that correlate sensor output to part microstructure. Then MLPC and AFIT will design and build the low-cost sensor system to track all key data, and test it on MLPCs custom build additive manufacturing test cell. Next MLPC will perform the necessary programming and data processing to implement a process monitoring system that will show sensor data position on the process maps in real-time, thus enabling in-process quality assurance. MLPC will then study and report the cost savings NASA could gain with this technology. Finally, MLPC will test this concept on an electron beam system and determine its viability for that process. At the end of Phase II the TRL will be 5, and this product will be ready for licensing for commercial use in existing additive manufacturing machines, and the MLPC developed additive manufacturing system will be available for licensing as a package unit with the integrated sensor system.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 123.69K | Year: 2016

In this Phase I STTR project, pursuant to the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) and Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) interests, the proposed collaborative effort between WSU and Advratech will represent the first AM optimization framework of its kind, constructed entirely from experimental sensor data collected in-situ. Rather than using in-process data to inform limited "physics-based" FE models or detect single defects long after a build is complete, this framework will leverage correlations between in-situ data, input process parameters, and output AM build characteristics to construct a "physics-capturing" empirical black box that can be used to quantify AM process uncertainty, analyze sensitivities of AM component outputs to both input process parameters and in-process information, and ultimately, to optimize each layer of SLM builds in real-time. In essence, this project will provide a wrap-around software package and optimization tool that combines each mode of in-process data to inform real-time process parameter selection based on one or more desired physical property outputs. It will be designed on our SLM R&D test bed, be seamlessly applicable to any SLM system (e.g., Concept Laser LaserCUSING, etc.), and more generally applicable to any AM system (e.g., NASA's EBF3) used to construct aerospace components.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: Physiolg Mechansms&Biomechancs | Award Amount: 354.57K | Year: 2016

Electrical signaling occurs in all cells and is of primary importance to excitable cell function. Neurons, skeletal and cardiac muscle communicate through production and conduction of electrical signals called action potentials (AP), a transient depolarization of the membrane produced by the concerted and highly regulated activities of many voltage-gated ion channels. Slight alterations in ion channel activity often lead to altered excitability. Some of the ion channel functions depend on sugar groups, called glycans, that may comprise ~15-30% of the mature ion channel mass. Most studies showed that sugar-dependent gating effects were imposed primarily by the terminal residue, sialic acid. However, little is known about whether and how regulated sialylation modulates excitability and conduction, in vivo. Thus, questioning whether and how (mechanistically) regulated sialylation modulates cardiac excitability and conduction will be investigated. A broad range of methods including molecular, cellular, tissue, whole animal, and computational techniques will be used at several organizational levels on an animal model comprised of 1) Sialyltransferase (ST) knockout strains producing proteins with fewer attached sialic acids, and 2) The enzymatic removal of sialic acids and N-glycans. The proposed studies are designed to test the viability of a novel mechanism by which glycans modulate electrical signaling, in vivo and in silico. The paradigm challenges being studied throughout this work and the melding of disparate biological areas including ion channel and glyco-biology, have broad implications. Because ion channel activity is involved in the function of all cells of the body, and since nearly all ion channels are glycosylated, gaining an understanding of a functional role for glycosylation in electrical signaling will likely have broad scientific impact. If the studies indicate that glycan structures influence ion channel function, then future studies should address the impact of glycans on ion channel structure as it relates to channel function. In addition to these broad scientific implications, the proposed studies will have broader impact that includes education, communication, and health. To address these broader issues, undergraduate, graduate, and medical students, particularly including minority students, will be trained in the scientific method by asking a fundamental question utilizing a variety of techniques. The generated scientific findings will be shared with the general scientific community, the lay public, and our collaborators, and effectively communicate the impact of these findings on the health of society.


Patent
Wright State University | Date: 2016-01-04

A phase frequency detector with two stages of operation; each stage containing two D flip-flops. Each D flip-flop is interconnected to eliminate detection dead zone while avoiding glitches and incorrect output conditions for fast phase locked loop convergence and wide-band applications.

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