World Vision Korea

Seoul, South Korea

World Vision Korea

Seoul, South Korea
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Kang Y.,Center for Human Nutrition | Cha S.,London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine | Yeo S.,World Vision Korea | Christian P.,Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Public Health Nutrition | Year: 2017

Objective: A community-based participatory nutrition promotion (CPNP) programme, involving a 2-week group nutrition session, attempted to improve child feeding and hygiene. The implementation, utilization and influence of the CPNP programme were examined by programme impact pathway (PIP) analysis. Design: Five CPNP programme components were evaluated: (i) degree of implementation; (ii) participants’ perception of the nutrition sessions; (iii) participants’ message recall; (iv) utilization of feeding and hygiene practices at early programme stage; and (v) participants’ engagement in other programmes. Setting: Habro and Melka Bello districts, Ethiopia. Subjects: Records of 372 nutrition sessions, as part of a cluster-randomized trial, among mothers (n 876 in intervention area, n 914 in control area) from a household survey and CPNP participants (n 197) from a recall survey. Results: Overall, most activities related to nutrition sessions were successfully operated with high fidelity (>90 %), but a few elements of the protocol were only moderately achieved. The recall survey among participants showed a positive perception of the sessions (~90 %) and a moderate level of message recall (~65 %). The household survey found that the CPNP participants had higher minimum dietary diversity at the early stage (34·0 v. 19·9 %, P=0·01) and a higher involvement in the Essential Nutrition Action (ENA) programme over a year of follow-up (28·2 v. 18·3 %; P<0·0001) compared with non-participants within the intervention area. Conclusions: Our PIP analysis suggests that CPNP was feasibly implemented, promoted a sustained utilization of proper feeding behaviours, and enhanced participation in the existing ENA programme. These findings provide a possible explanation to understanding CPNP’s effectiveness. Copyright © The Authors 2017


Park S.-E.,World Vision Korea | Kim S.,World Vision Korea | Ouma C.,World Vision Eastern Africa Regional Office | Loha M.,World Vision Eastern Africa Regional Office | And 2 more authors.
Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition | Year: 2012

Globally, acute malnutrition triggers more than 50% of childhood mortality in children under 5 years old, which implies that about 3.5 million children die of malnutrition each year. Prior to the advent of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), the management of acute malnutrition was limited to hospitals, resulting in low coverage rates with high mortality, as malnourished cases were indentified at later stages often plagued with complications. However, current availability of RUTF has enabled malnourished children to be treated at communities. Further, because RUTF is dehydrated and sealed, it has the added advantage of a lower risk of bacterial contamination, thereby prolonging its storage life at room temperature. Recent data indicate that Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) is as cost effective as other high-impact public health measures such as oral rehydration therapy for acute diarrheal diseases, vitamin A supplementation, and antibiotic treatment for acute respiratory infections. Despite the high efficacy of CMAM programs, CMAM still draws insufficient attention for global implementation, suggesting that CMAM programs should be integrated into local or regional routine health systems. Knowledge gaps requiring further research include: the definition of practical screening criteria for malnourished children at communities, the need for systematic antibiotic therapy during malnutrition treatment, and the dietary management of severe malnutrition in children below 6 months of age. © 2014 by The Korean Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.


PubMed | World Vision Korea, East Africa Regional Office, Center for Human Nutrition and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Maternal & child nutrition | Year: 2016

Few trials have shown that promoting complementary feeding among young children is effective in improving child linear growth in resource-challenged settings. We designed a community-based participatory nutrition promotion (CPNP) programme adapting a Positive Deviance/Hearth approach that engaged mothers in 2-week nutrition sessions using the principles of learning by doing around child feeding. We aimed to test the effectiveness of the CPNP for improving child growth in rural Ethiopia. A cluster randomized trial was implemented by adding the CPNP to the existing government nutrition programmes (six clusters) vs. government programmes only (six clusters). A total of 1790 children aged 6 to 12months (876 in the intervention and 914 in the control areas) were enrolled and assessed on anthropometry every 3months for a year. Multi-level mixed-effect regression analysis of longitudinal outcome data (n=1475) examined the programme impact on growth, adjusting for clustering and enrollment characteristics. Compared with children 6 to 24months of age in the control area, those in the intervention area had a greater increase in z scores for length-for-age [difference (diff): 0.021 z score/month, 95% CI: 0.008, 0.034] and weight-for-length (diff: 0.042 z score/month, 95% CI: 0.024, 0.059). At the end of the 12-month follow-up, children in the intervention area showed an 8.1% (P=0.02) and 6.3% (P=0.046) lower prevalence of stunting and underweight, respectively, after controlling for differences in the prevalence at enrollment, compared with the control group. A novel CPNP programme was effective in improving child growth and reducing undernutrition in this setting. 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


PubMed | World Vision Korea
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology & nutrition | Year: 2013

Globally, acute malnutrition triggers more than 50% of childhood mortality in children under 5 years old, which implies that about 3.5 million children die of malnutrition each year. Prior to the advent of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), the management of acute malnutrition was limited to hospitals, resulting in low coverage rates with high mortality, as malnourished cases were indentified at later stages often plagued with complications. However, current availability of RUTF has enabled malnourished children to be treated at communities. Further, because RUTF is dehydrated and sealed, it has the added advantage of a lower risk of bacterial contamination, thereby prolonging its storage life at room temperature. Recent data indicate that Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) is as cost effective as other high-impact public health measures such as oral rehydration therapy for acute diarrheal diseases, vitamin A supplementation, and antibiotic treatment for acute respiratory infections. Despite the high efficacy of CMAM programs, CMAM still draws insufficient attention for global implementation, suggesting that CMAM programs should be integrated into local or regional routine health systems. Knowledge gaps requiring further research include: the definition of practical screening criteria for malnourished children at communities, the need for systematic antibiotic therapy during malnutrition treatment, and the dietary management of severe malnutrition in children below 6 months of age.

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