World Noni Research Foundation

Chennai, India

World Noni Research Foundation

Chennai, India

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PubMed | Indian Institute of Spices Research, Providence College, Center for Medicinal Plants Research, World Noni Research Foundation and Central Plantation Crops Research Institute
Type: | Journal: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2016

Ginger is a rhizomatous plant that belongs to the family Zingiberaceae. It is a herbaceous perennial but cultivated as annual, with crop duration of 7-10 months. Ginger is native to India and Tropical South Asia. The tuberous rhizomes or underground stems of ginger are used as condiment, an aromatic stimulant, and food preservative as well as in traditional medicine. Ginger is propagated vegetatively with rhizome bits as seed material. Cultivation of ginger is plagued by rhizome rot diseases, most of which are mainly spread through infected seed rhizomes. Micropropagation will help in production of disease-free planting material. Sexual reproduction is absent in ginger, making recombinant breeding very impossible. In vitro technology can thus become the preferred choice as it can be utilized for multiplication, conservation of genetic resources, generating variability, gene transfer, molecular tagging, and their utility in crop improvement of these crops.


Singh A.K.,Md University | Singh K.,World Noni Research Foundation | Peter P.I.,World Noni Research Foundation
Plant Genetic Resources: Characterisation and Utilisation | Year: 2011

Based on the distribution, molecular similarity and use of Morinda citrifolia L., and occurrence of a wild Morinda species, Southeast Asia and Micronesia have been suggested to be the places where noni originated. The present article discusses the indices used by Vavilov and subsequent authorities on the origin of crop plants to argue that South Asia (Southeast India) has a greater probability of being the centre of domestication/origin for noni than Southeast Asia or Micronesia. The basic reasoning is that economically important plant cannot originate without richness in biodiversity and ingenuity of local people. India with rich floristic diversity, one of the centres of origin of crop plants with a natural distribution of Morinda species, including M. citrifolia L. and its immediate ancestors, has the oldest reference of occurrence, use and cultivation (Vedic literature); therefore, it appears to be the more probable centre of noni's origin. The ancient history of the expansion of Indian culture, religion and trade to Southeast Asian countries corroborate the possible role of Indians in the introduction of noni or knowledge regarding its value to Southeast Asia, from which it was carried to Micronesia and Polynesia, which provided a more favourable environmental niche for perpetuation and use. © Copyright NIAB 2011.


Singh A.K.,World Noni Research Foundation | Peter P.,World Noni Research Foundation | Singh K.,World Noni Research Foundation
Asian Agri-History | Year: 2011

Noni is a small evergreen shrub or tree, native to South, Southeast Asia, and Australia. Presently, the distribution is pantropical. Though, it is a shy plant, yet it persists well even under adverse conditions. All parts of the plant have traditional and/or modern uses. Roots and bark are used for dyes and medicine; trunks for firewood and tools; and leaves and fruits for food and medicine. Agriculturally, it is well suited for intercropping within traditional agroforestry subsistence farming systems. A renewed interest in studying botanicals that were used in traditional healing systems has brought Noni in the forefront for further bio-prospecting and use. Scientific studies have shown that Noni consists of more than 160 phytochemicals with potential to stimulate the immune system, purify the blood, inhibit tumor growth, regulate proper cell function, regenerate damaged cells, etc. In light of these developments, the present article discusses in detail, the history, botany, origin and distribution, potential use, and future perspective of Noni plant in agriculture as a crop to supplement food, nutraceuticals for health care and a medicine for curing a range of diseases, and in production of large number of other by-products, thereby increasing farmers' income and human wellness.


PubMed | Indian Institute of Spices Research, Providence College and World Noni Research Foundation
Type: | Journal: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2016

Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews (syn. V. fragrans Salisb.), a native of Central America, is the primary source of natural vanillin and plays a major role in the global economy. The gene pool of vanilla is threatened by deforestation and overcollection that has resulted in disappearance of natural habitats and wild species. Continuous vegetative propagation and lack of natural seed set and sufficient variations in the gene pool hamper crop improvement programs. In vitro techniques, one of the key tools of plant biotechnology, can be employed for overcoming specific problems, viz. production of disease-free clones, inducing somaclonal variations, developing hybrids, gene pool conservation, incorporating desired traits by distant hybridization, genetic engineering, etc. However, realization of these objectives necessitates standardization of protocols. This chapter describes the various protocols optimized for crop improvement in Vanilla species.


PubMed | Indian Institute of Spices Research, Providence College and World Noni Research Foundation
Type: | Journal: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2016

Black pepper, Piper nigrum L., the King of spices is the most widely used spice growing in the South-Western region of India. The humid tropical evergreen forest bordering the Malabar Coast (Western Ghats is one of the hot spot areas of plant bio-diversity on earth) is its center of origin and diversity. However, the crop faces constraints like rampant fungal and viral diseases, lack of disease free planting material, hence biotechnological tools can be utilized to address these problems and strides have been made successfully. The standardization of micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, in vitro conservation, protoplast isolation, and genetic transformation protocols are described here. The protocols could be utilized to achieve similar goals in the related species of Piper too.


PubMed | Indian Institute of Spices Research, Providence College, World Noni Research Foundation and Center for Medicinal Plants Research
Type: | Journal: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2016

Turmeric is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial but cultivated as annual, belonging to the family Zingiberaceae. It is a native of India and South East Asia. The tuberous rhizomes or underground stems of turmeric are used from antiquity as condiments, a dye and as an aromatic stimulant in several medicines. Turmeric is an important crop in India and it is used as a spice, food preservative, coloring agent, cosmetic as well as for its medicinal properties. Propagation is done vegetatively with rhizome bits as seed materials. It is plagued by rhizome rot diseases most of which are mainly spread through infected seed rhizomes. Micropropagation will help in production of disease-free seed. Sexual reproduction is rare in turmeric, making recombinant breeding very difficult. In vitro technology can thus become the preferred choice and it can be utilized for multiplication, conservation of genetic resources, generating variability, gene transfer, molecular tagging, and their utility in crop improvement.

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