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Receive press releases from IQ4I Research & Consultancy Pvt. Ltd.: By Email IQ4I Research & Consultancy Published a New Report on "Brain Monitoring Devices Global Market – Forecast to 2023" Brain monitoring devices aid in understand the activity of brain and explore structure and functions. Increasing incidence and prevalence neurological diseases, rising awareness, technological advancements/innovations are driving the market growth. Boston, MA, April 25, 2017 --( Brain monitoring devices market is growing at a steady rate, as estimated by IQ4I Research the market is expected to reach $10.01billion by 2023. The major factors driving the brain monitoring device market includes growing incidence and prevalence of neurological disorders, rising awareness about neurodegenerative disorders, growing healthcare spending and technological advancements/innovations offering wider scope of applications for brain monitoring. However, some of the factors like shortage of trained professionals, high cost of complex devices, stringent regulations and unfavorable reimbursement policies may hinder the growth of global brain monitoring device market. The brain monitoring devices global market is segmented based on their products, applications, end users and geography. Among products, sleep monitoring devices holds the largest market share because of the advancements in portable sleep devices technologies and growing incidence of obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep monitoring devices is expected to grow at the single digit mid-CAGR. The global brain monitoring devices application segment is classified into neurodegenerative disorders, brain tumor, psychiatric disorders, sleep disorders and other applications. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by progressive loss of neurons in the central nervous system and Epilepsy, Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington’s disease falls under this category. In 2016, the market was estimated to be dominated by neurodegenerative disorders. The large share of this segment can be attributed to the growing incidence of Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) globally owing to various factors like, increasing occurrence of falls, blunt trauma and motor vehicle crashes among other causes of TBIs and along with the increasing aging population. Geographically, the bran monitoring devices market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of the World. North America region held the largest market share within that United States accounted for the largest share this growth is driven due to its high acceptance of advanced technologies and sophisticated universal treatment facilities. Asia- Pacific region is the fastest growing region due to its increase in healthcare spending and advancements in healthcare facilities, the easy access to advanced healthcare technology. The global brain monitoring devices market is fragmented where key players like GE Healthcare (U.S.), Philips N.V. (Netherland), Siemens Healthineers (Germany), Medtronic (Ireland) and Natus Medical Inc. (U.S.) holding a major share in 2016. The protection of intellectual property rights plays a very important role as a long term strategy for survival of the company and to maintain a competitive advantage. According to IQ4I Analysis, Advanced Brain Monitoring filed the largest number of PCT applications followed by Siemens Healthineers and Philips N.V. at World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Some of the prominent players in brain monitoring device market include Advanced Brain Monitoring (U.S.), Cadwell Laboratories (U.S.), CAS Medicals Inc. (U.S), Compumedics Limited (Australia), Electrical Geodesics Incorporated (U.S.), Elekta AB (Sweden), GE Healthcare (U.S.), Integra Lifesciences (U.S.), Koninklijke Philips N.V. (Netherland), Masimo corporation (U.S.), Medtronic (Ireland), Natus Medical Inc.(U.S.), Nihon Kohden Corporation (Japan) and Siemens Healthineers (Germany). Boston, MA, April 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Brain monitoring devices are used to monitor and diagnose the neurological conditions by exploring the structure and functions of the brain in patients. These devices provide the information of the brain and greater understanding of neurological problems, with possible new treatments. Among brain monitoring devices CT and MRI are the conventional devices which are being used for the structural diagnosis of the brain like tumour, head injury etc., whereas EEG, MEG, TCD, oximeters and ICP monitors are the recent techniques used for the functional imaging of the brain. EEG measures the electrical activity generated by the various cortical layers of the brain whereas, MEG capture the magnetic fields generated by neural activity within the brain. Similarly, TCD measures the velocity of the blood flow through the brain’s blood vessels, oximeters are used to measure the regional cerebral oxygen saturation with in the brain and ICP monitors monitor the intracranial pressure within the skull while treating severe traumatic brain injury in patients. In addition to all these devices, sleep monitoring devices which occupies major share in the brain monitoring devices global market, are being used to understand the person’s sleep physiology and track sleep with the aim of finding patterns and correlations with person’s behaviours.Brain monitoring devices market is growing at a steady rate, as estimated by IQ4I Research the market is expected to reach $10.01billion by 2023. The major factors driving the brain monitoring device market includes growing incidence and prevalence of neurological disorders, rising awareness about neurodegenerative disorders, growing healthcare spending and technological advancements/innovations offering wider scope of applications for brain monitoring. However, some of the factors like shortage of trained professionals, high cost of complex devices, stringent regulations and unfavorable reimbursement policies may hinder the growth of global brain monitoring device market.The brain monitoring devices global market is segmented based on their products, applications, end users and geography. Among products, sleep monitoring devices holds the largest market share because of the advancements in portable sleep devices technologies and growing incidence of obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep monitoring devices is expected to grow at the single digit mid-CAGR.The global brain monitoring devices application segment is classified into neurodegenerative disorders, brain tumor, psychiatric disorders, sleep disorders and other applications. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by progressive loss of neurons in the central nervous system and Epilepsy, Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington’s disease falls under this category. In 2016, the market was estimated to be dominated by neurodegenerative disorders. The large share of this segment can be attributed to the growing incidence of Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) globally owing to various factors like, increasing occurrence of falls, blunt trauma and motor vehicle crashes among other causes of TBIs and along with the increasing aging population.Geographically, the bran monitoring devices market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of the World. North America region held the largest market share within that United States accounted for the largest share this growth is driven due to its high acceptance of advanced technologies and sophisticated universal treatment facilities. Asia- Pacific region is the fastest growing region due to its increase in healthcare spending and advancements in healthcare facilities, the easy access to advanced healthcare technology.The global brain monitoring devices market is fragmented where key players like GE Healthcare (U.S.), Philips N.V. (Netherland), Siemens Healthineers (Germany), Medtronic (Ireland) and Natus Medical Inc. (U.S.) holding a major share in 2016. The protection of intellectual property rights plays a very important role as a long term strategy for survival of the company and to maintain a competitive advantage. According to IQ4I Analysis, Advanced Brain Monitoring filed the largest number of PCT applications followed by Siemens Healthineers and Philips N.V. at World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).Some of the prominent players in brain monitoring device market include Advanced Brain Monitoring (U.S.), Cadwell Laboratories (U.S.), CAS Medicals Inc. (U.S), Compumedics Limited (Australia), Electrical Geodesics Incorporated (U.S.), Elekta AB (Sweden), GE Healthcare (U.S.), Integra Lifesciences (U.S.), Koninklijke Philips N.V. (Netherland), Masimo corporation (U.S.), Medtronic (Ireland), Natus Medical Inc.(U.S.), Nihon Kohden Corporation (Japan) and Siemens Healthineers (Germany). Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from IQ4I Research & Consultancy Pvt. Ltd.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

(Reuters) - Europe’s top tech hubs tend to radiate from massive capital cities like London, Berlin and Paris. But the heart of European innovation isn’t a major metropolis –it’s a small city in the Dutch-speaking region of Flanders. That’s the conclusion of Reuters’ second annual ranking of Europe’s Most Innovative Universities, a list that identifies and ranks the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and help drive the global economy. The most innovative university in Europe, for the second year running, is Belgium’s KU Leuven. This nearly 600-year-old institution was founded by Pope Martin V, but today it’s better known for technology than theology: KU Leuven maintains one of the largest independent research and development organizations on the planet. In fiscal 2015, the university’s research spending exceeded €454 million, and its patent portfolio currently includes 586 active families, each one representing an invention protected in multiple countries. How does a relatively small Catholic university out-innovate bigger, better-known institutions across Europe? KU Leuven earned its first-place rank, in part, by producing a high volume of influential inventions. Its researchers submit more patents than most other universities on the continent, and outside researchers frequently cite KU Leuven inventions in their own patent applications. Those are key criteria in Reuters ranking of Europe’s Most Innovative Universities, which was compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, and is based on proprietary data and analysis of indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The second most innovative university in Europe is Imperial College London, an institution whose researchers have been responsible for the discovery of penicillin, the development of holography and the invention of fiber optics. The third-place University of Cambridge has been associated with 91 Nobel Laureates during its 800-year history. And the fourth-place Technical University of Munich has spun off more than 800 companies since 1990, including a variety of high-tech startups in industries including renewable energy, semiconductors and nanotechnology. Overall, the same countries that dominate European business and politics dominate the ranking of Europe's Most Innovative Universities. German universities account for 23 of the 100 institutions on the list, more than any other country, and the United Kingdom comes in second, tied with France, each with 17 institutions. But those three countries are also among the most populous and richest countries on the continent. Control for those factors, and it turns out that countries with much smaller populations and modest economies often outperform big ones. The Republic of Ireland has only three schools on the entire list, but with a population of less than 5 million people, it can boast more top 100 innovative universities per capita than any other country in Europe. On the same per capita basis, the second most innovative country on the list is Denmark, followed by Belgium, Switzerland and the Netherlands. Germany, the United Kingdom and France rank in the middle of the pack, an indication that they may be underperforming compared with their smaller neighbors: On a per capita basis, none of those countries has half as many top 100 universities than Ireland. And the same trends hold true if you look at national economies. According to the International Monetary Fund, in 2016 Germany’s gross domestic product exceeded $3.49 trillion –11 times larger than Ireland at $307 billion, yet Germany has only 7 times as many top 100 innovative universities. Some countries underperform even more drastically. Russia is Europe’s most populous country and has the region’s fifth largest economy, yet none of its universities count among the top 100. Other notable absences include any universities from Ukraine or Romania–a fact that reveals another divide between Western and Eastern Europe. To compile the ranking of Europe’s most innovative universities, Clarivate Analytics (formerly the Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters) began by identifying more than 600 global organizations that published the most articles in academic journals, including educational institutions, nonprofit charities, and government-funded institutions. That list was reduced to institutions that filed at least 50 patents with the World Intellectual Property Organization in the period between 2010 and 2015. Then they evaluated each candidate on 10 different metrics, focusing on academic papers (which indicate basic research) and patent filings (which point to an institution's ability to apply research and commercialize its discoveries). Finally, they trimmed the list so that it only included European universities, and then ranked them based on their performance. This is the second consecutive year that Clarivate and Reuters have collaborated to rank Europe’s Most Innovative Universities, and three universities that ranked in the top 100 in 2016 fell off the list entirely: the Netherland’s Eindhoven University of Technology, Germany’s University of Kiel, and the UK’s Queens University Belfast. All three universities filed fewer than 50 patents during the period examined for the ranking, and thus were eliminated from consideration. They’ve been replaced by three new entrants to the top 100: the University of Glasgow (#54), the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis (#94), and the Autonomous University of Madrid (#100). The returning universities that made the biggest moves on the list were the Netherland’s Leiden University (up 21 spots to #17) and Germany’s Technical University of Berlin (up 21 spots to #41). Belgium’s Université Libre of Brussels (down 17 to #38) and the UK’s University of Leeds (down 17 to #73) made the biggest moves in the opposite direction. Generally, though, the list remained largely stable: Nine of the top ten schools of 2016 remained in the top 10 for 2017, and 17 of the top 20. This stability is understandable because something as large as university paper output and patent performance is unlikely to change quickly. Of course, the relative ranking of any university does not provide a complete picture of whether its researchers are doing important, innovative work. Since the ranking measures innovation on an institutional level, it may overlook particularly innovative departments or programs: a university might rank low for overall innovation but still operate one of the world's most innovative computer science laboratories, for instance. And it's important to remember that whether a university ranks at the top or the bottom of the list, it's still within the top 100 on the continent: All of these universities produce original research, create useful technology and stimulate the global economy.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.ictsd.org

25 May, Washington, US, and online. TRADE, SECURITY, AND THE U.S.-MEXICO RELATIONSHIP. This event is being organised by the Brookings Institution’s Mexico Initiative and will feature a series of panel discussions that will explore the various dimensions of the US-Mexico relationship, including on trade. Please note that the event will also be webcast live. To learn more and to register, please visit the Brookings website. 25 May, Geneva, Switzerland. GLOBAL HEALTH R&D: HOW CAN WE BEST SET PRIORITIES BASED ON EVIDENCE? This event is being organised by the governments of Switzerland and South Africa, as well as the European Commission, and will be hosted by the Global Health Centre. The meeting will examine research and development (R&D) activities within the context of global health, examining different initiatives that are currently in place to help in setting priorities for future R&D financing. To learn more and to register, please visit the event website. 29-31 May, Dakar, Senegal. PRACTICAL WORKSHOP ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND TRADITIONAL CULTURAL EXPRESSIONS. This workshop is being organised by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and will focus on building knowledge and exchanging views on the subjects of traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions. To learn more, visit the WIPO website. 31 May-1 June, Almaty, Kazakhstan. WORKSHOP: EFFICIENT MANAGEMENT OF STATE-OWNED ENTERPRISES. This workshop is being organised by the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) and will examine the challenges and prospects for reforming state-owned enterprises in Asia. The event will bring together government representatives from various countries in the region. Please note that attendance is by invitation only. For more information, please visit the ADBI website. An updated list of forthcoming WTO meetings is posted here. Please bear in mind that dates and times of WTO meetings are often changed, and that the WTO does not always announce the important informal meetings of the different bodies. Unless otherwise indicated, all WTO meetings are held at the WTO, Centre William Rappard, rue de Lausanne 154, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland, and are open to WTO members and accredited observers only. 30 May: Workshop on Aid for Trade 31 May: Committee on Trade and Development – Session on Aid for Trade 1 June: Working Party on the Accession of Comoros 2 June, Washington, US. INDIA’S SEARCH FOR PROSPERITY. This event is being organised by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and will feature economist Vijay Joshi as the guest speaker. Joshi will lead a discussion based on his book, India’s Long Road: The Search for Prosperity, which examines the evolution of the Indian economy and the roles of different actors in this context. Joshi will be part of a panel featuring speakers from the International Monetary Fund and the Carnegie Endowment. To learn more and to register, please visit the Carnegie website. 12 June, Geneva, Switzerland. DISCIPLINING FOSSIL FUEL SUBSIDIES: A CONTRIBUTION OF THE TRADE SYSTEM TO CLIMATE MITIGATION AND SDGS. This roundtable is being organised by the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) as part of the E15 Initiative, which is jointly implemented with the World Economic Forum. The focus of this event will be looking at trade tools and how these can be used to help discipline subsidies for fossil fuels. The meeting will include both WTO negotiators and experts in the field. Please note that attendance is by invitation only. To learn more, visit the ICTSD website. 14 June, London, UK. BREXIT, TRUMP AND THE FUTURE OF THE TRANSATLANTIC ALLIANCE. This Chatham House event will examine the implications of Brexit and the election of US President Donald Trump for the bilateral relationship between the United Kingdom and the United States. The event’s guest speaker will be Sir Nigel Sheinwald GCMG, who is a Visiting Professor at King’s College London Department of War Studies, and was previously the UK’s ambassador to the United States and the UK’s permanent representative to the European Union. Please note that attendance is by invitation only. To learn more, visit the Chatham House website. 20 June, Brussels, Belgium. INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON WOMEN AND TRADE. This event is being hosted jointly by the European Commission and the International Trade Centre, bringing together stakeholders from a range of backgrounds with the goal of building support for empowering women through trade. A full event agenda is available online. To learn more and the register, please visit the European Commission website. 30 June – 2 July, Geneva, Switzerland. FIFTH GLOBAL REVIEW OF AID FOR TRADE: “REDUCING TRADE COSTS FOR INCLUSIVE, SUSTAINABLE GROWTH.” This biennial WTO event will feature over 50 sessions focusing on the Aid for Trade Initiative, as well as how to address the issue of trade costs in the context of the UN’s Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development and the related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Please note that registration closes on 26 June. To learn more, please visit the WTO website. 26-28 September, Geneva, Switzerland. WTO PUBLIC FORUM 2017. This year’s edition of the WTO’s outreach event will have as its theme “Trade: Behind the Headlines.” The meeting will aim to look at the real-life implications of trade, as opposed to rhetoric, and will also look at how trade can support the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and related issues. A call for proposals is currently open for those who wish to organise sessions at this year’s forum, with a due date of 4 June 2017. To learn more, please visit the WTO website.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Presidential Elections in Iran Hamed Behravan Iran Program Director Democracy Council "Many progressive Iranians, and specially the western-oriented youth, want the incumbent President Rouhani to continue working towards a more open society he is promising on the campaign trail. Rouhani is playing into this trend by adapting a much harsher rhetoric against the establishment, and specially the powerful IRGC and judiciary -- a rhetoric so harsh that was criticized openly by the country's supreme leader Ayatollah Khamenei. Despite the usual difficulty in predicting the outcome of Iran's elections, one thing is for sure: The majority of the Iranian people still believe their votes matter, even if it can only raise the price the establishment has to pay if it decides to override the will of the people, and even if that will is only limited to choosing between the lesser of two evils." Based in Washington, D.C., Behravan has been a freelance journalist focusing on Iran for more than a decade. As a journalist, he produced a TV show in Persian focusing on the role of technology in helping users bypass censorship and improve civil society. As Democracy Council's Iran program director, he has designed, executed, and managed complex projects to help the civil society organizations and activists in Iran in areas such as rule of law, human rights, and information freedom. He is fluent in Persian. Website: www.demcouncil.org Expert Contact: behravan@demcouncil.org Why the White House Needs an Onsite Coach/Psychologist Michael Klein, PsyD Psychologist, Principal MK Insights LLC "The key to staying on track at work is managing internal roadblocks and reacting thoughtfully to external ones. While a few industries understand the benefit to the bottom line in having highly trained, in-house coaches and advisors available, most haven't caught on yet. This is not about providing therapy at work but, rather, applying sound psychological insights and tools to help successful (and often narcissistic or sociopathic) leaders perform at peak capacity based on their own need to do well and manage critical blindspots." Dr. Klein is available to speak about the use of in-house psychiatrists and psychologists as consultants when a deeper understanding of mental health and personality is required. As a psychologist, he can address how personality, emotional intelligence, and motivators impact decision-making, management style, and potential "de-railing" behaviors. He is the author of "Trapped in the Family Business: A practical guide to understanding and managing this hidden dilemma," and is approaching 20 years of experience as a human resources professional, psychologist, and organizational consultant. Book: www.trappedinthefamilybusiness.com Website: www.mkinsights.com Expert Contact: mklein@mkinsights.com Earlier this month, the Trump administration formally told Congress that it intends to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico. Following are experts who are available for interviews on this topic: Alex Lawson Senior Reporter, International Trade Law360 "The big dynamic to watch is how aggressive the Trump administration will be in overhauling the agreement. Trump spent his entire campaign bashing NAFTA as a disaster for the U.S. economy and flirted with completely terminating the agreement as recently as a few weeks ago. But the comments from US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer suggest that a more modest 'modernization' of NAFTA may be in order. The administration will also be fielding a litany of calls from industry groups and other advocates who want to see the NAFTA reshaped in their best interests. Lighthizer's notification to Congress mentioned that he was interested in improving the NAFTA's labor, environmental, digital trade and intellectual property rules, but each of those broad topics contains a multitude of policy options for the administration." Lawson, a senior reporter covering all aspects of international trade, has been reporting on NAFTA for years, including many stories on President Trump's NAFTA policies and proposed changes. He can provide other reporters with unbiased commentary – on business, legal and political implications -- rooted in research and first-party interviews. His stories for Law360 focus on trade disputes, enforcement efforts and regulatory developments. He has covered the negotiations of numerous regional trade agreements, including the passage of the largest bundle of trade legislation in two decades. Recent Law360 stories by Lawson include coverage of the first steps by the Trump White House to investigate the causes of U.S. trade deficits (https://www.law360.com/articles/913580), news of the $1.2 billion penalty imposed on ZTE Corp. for violating export control rules for Iran and North Korea (https://www.law360.com/articles/899473), and an analysis of Trump's trade brain trust (https://www.law360.com/articles/876707). Contact: Eric Sokolsky, eric@plat4orm.com Raj Bhala Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law; Rice Distinguished Professor University of Kansas School of Law "NAFTA has become a pillar of the American economy and stands as one of the broadest, deepest free-trade agreements in human history. One way to appreciate its significance is to see it in the light of the long, uneasy history of U.S.-Mexican relations and swings in Mexican economy policy through much of the 20th century. Another, 21st century, way to think about NAFTA is to realize that America, Canada and Mexico already spent eight years rewriting and modernizing it -- it's called the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Unilateral threats of withdrawal or demands for renegotiations risk triggering yet more protectionist moves across the globe." An expert on international trade law, Bhala can discuss free trade agreements, NAFTA, its original form, renegotiation, economic impacts of the deal on the three cooperating nations, relations between the three countries, national security related to trade and related topics. Bhala has worked extensively in all three NAFTA nations and more than 25 countries around the world, including a majority of the Trans-Pacific Partnership nations. He has written dozens of books and journal articles on international trade, including "TPP Objectively: Law, Economics, and National Security of History's Largest, Longest Free Trade Agreement," "Modern GATT Law" and "Understanding Islamic Law (Shari'a)." Contact: Mike Krings, mkrings@ku.edu Brandon Stallard Founder and Chief Executive Officer TPS Logistics "The impact of Trump's public criticisms of NAFTA has been negligible. There have been no duty rate increases and no shipping pattern changes. I don't foresee anything happening in the near future that would be detrimental to American trade. However, Trump's newly released 'A Better Way' tax plan -- which proposes a 20 percent border tax -- could have a momentous economic blow to the U.S. Our North American trade relationships feature more large-item manufacturing, so minor adjustments would be a far more feasible form of action." Stallard is a nationally recognized expert in transportation. His company has a strong focus on North American trade, regularly moving freight and goods between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. He brings over 30 years of experience to the table and can apply his expertise across a plethora of different industries, including retail, manufacturing, automotive, oil and gas, health and beauty, and more. His expertise includes transportation, trade regulation, North American cross-border trucking and trade, and international shipping. Website: www.tpslogistics.com Contact: Rachel Bonello, rbonello@identitypr.com Doreen Edelman Shareholder and Co-Leader, Global Business Team Baker Donelson "Leaders of all three NAFTA member countries have now acknowledged the benefits that might be gained by renegotiating the 1994 regional free trade agreement. And, despite criticism of NAFTA as it currently exists, President Trump recently recognized the virtues of regional trade, declaring in a recent meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that both countries will 'coordinate closely to protect jobs in our hemisphere and keep wealth on our continent.' Indeed, there is a lot to be gained from renegotiation. While the U.S. economy has certainly benefitted under NAFTA, there are four main areas in which NAFTA may be improved for the benefit of U.S. business and job growth: labor and environmental standards, rules of origin, e-commerce and professional services." Edelman has more than 25 years of experience counseling companies on import and export compliance, foreign investment and global expansion and her work has carried her to all corners of the world. She has helped to establish a natural gas facility in Turkey, protected a client's intellectual property in Japan, and watched out for the interests of a major fast-food chain franchisor in Latin America. She is co-author of a comprehensive analysis of NAFTA and many other trade-related articles. She recently penned an article published by The Hill, "4 Smart Ways to Improve NAFTA" (http://tinyurl.com/l7gb59q). Blog: https://www.exportcompliancematters.com Bio: https://www.bakerdonelson.com/Doreen-M-Edelman Contact: Jonathan Breed, breed@postoncommunications.com Mohan Tatikonda Professor of Operations Management, and Dr. L. Leslie and Mary Louise Waters Faculty Fellow Indiana University Kelley School of Business "Changing NAFTA alone does nothing to address workers' skills and the impact of increasing automation and productivity, but there are other ways to increase high-wage U.S. manufacturing jobs. That includes companies refocusing their product lines to be more innovative, customized and responsive to customer needs. Why don't companies do that now? One is because executives sometimes find it easier to go down the cost minimization path rather than the innovation path. The other reason is that executives who are following the belief of maximizing shareholder returns are not always reinvesting in company R&D and worker skills." Tatikonda is an expert in corporate strategy, international manufacturing and supply chains. He is an international consultant and researcher with field experience in Mexico and across the globe. He formerly consulted for the World Bank and is an international keynote speaker. Bio: https://kelley.iu.edu/facultyglobal/directory/FacultyProfile.cfm?netID=tatikond Contact: Teresa Mackin, tmackin@iu.edu Trevor Collier Associate Professor, Economics University of Dayton "It is unlikely that Donald Trump will be happy with the result of renegotiating NAFTA. One of his complaints on the campaign trail was that NAFTA caused a reduction in auto manufacturing jobs in the United States. Manufacturing jobs in the automotive industry actually increased in the United States immediately following NAFTA. Automation has caused the largest decline in U.S. manufacturing jobs. No renegotiation of NAFTA is going to halt the increase in automation." Collier teaches principles of economics and microeconomics, public finance, economics of the environment and managerial economics. Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PA45kPy1tW8&feature=youtu.be Bio: https://udayton.edu/directory/business/economics_and_finance/collier_trevor.php Contact: Meagan Pant, mpant1@udayton.edu Dr. Nozar Hashemzadeh Professor of Economics Radford University A summary of Dr. Hashemzadeh's research regarding the impact of NAFTA on jobs in the U.S.: "For the last decade, the U.S. labor market has been characterized by rapid technological change, intensifying competitive pressure from abroad, declining union power, automation, favorable energy prices, downsizing, and rapid expansion in information, financial and investment services. The outlook for job growth depends in large part on the growth of the domestic economy, increased exports, exchange rate fluctuations, tariffs and other potential trade barriers, official protection for intellectual property rights in other countries, and the degree of economic and political stability in U.S. trading partners. Despite genuine differences of opinion among supporters and antagonists of NAFTA, nearly all economic studies of the trade accord have concluded that relaxation of trade barriers will benefit consumers and promote economic growth in North America. Dr. Hashemzadeh joined Radford University's Economics Department in 1983, where he has been teaching and conducting research on macroeconomic issues, employment disparities by race, international trade and the U.S.'s international competitiveness. He has been the advisor to the International Honor Society in Economics since 1990. Expert Contact: nhashemz@radford.edu Steven Otillar Partner, Akin Gump in Houston President-Elect, Association of International Petroleum Negotiators Otillar is available to discuss the potential impact of a NAFTA renegotiation on oil and gas, and the U.S. relationship with both Mexico and Canada, in light of Mexico's energy reforms and Canada's recent energy infrastructure deals and focus on shale. Otillar focuses his practice on the development, finance, acquisition and divestiture of domestic and international energy projects, with an emphasis on upstream projects in emerging markets. He advises clients on public tenders and auctions and a variety of development agreements in relation to major energy infrastructure projects around the world. He is representing a number of U.S. companies involved in Mexico's deep and shallow water auctions. Bio: https://www.akingump.com/en/lawyers-advisors/steven-p-otillar.html Contact: Vasiya Kemp, vasiya@BamePR.com Richard Walawender Principal Attorney Miller Canfield, Detroit Walawender is co-leader of the firm's Corporate Group, and director of the firm's International Practice and Autonomous Vehicle Practice. His practice specialties include mergers and acquisitions, corporate and commercial law, corporate governance and securities, private equity, venture capital, equity and debt financing, international transactions and joint ventures, project finance, and franchising. As director of the firm's International Practice, he has also been the lead attorney on numerous multinational M&A transactions for U.S., Canadian, European, Asian, Mexican, and other non-U.S. clients. Walawender recently penned two articles on the future of NAFTA in the new administration: "Worries about NAFTA Take Back Seat to Potential 'Border Adjustment Tax'" (http://tinyurl.com/kgwe5og) and "Could President Trump Really Pull the U.S. out of NAFTA? Basic FAQs" (http://tinyurl.com/kz2mfqo). Bio: https://www.millercanfield.com/RichardWalawender Contact: Carol L. Lundberg, lundberg@millercanfield.com Eugene Laney Head of International Trade Affairs DHL Express Laney has spoken about NAFTA at length, and can share his insights, specifically on the benefits of modernizing American's free trade agreements. Based out of Washington, D.C., Laney has more than 20 years of experience ensuring corporate compliance with regulatory requirements and tracks international trade and cargo security issues for the global market leader in the express and logistics industry, making him a great expert source. Contact: Sloane Fistel, sloane.fistel@rbbcommunications.com Jay Erstling Attorney Petterson Thuente IP With the Trump administration announcing it will renegotiate NAFTA, backed by a campaign threat to withdraw, what's at stake for U.S. patent and trademark owners? NAFTA contains significant IP provisions. When Trump pulled the U.S. out of the TPP, he gave up major improvements in international IP protection that had been negotiated for U.S. IP owners. It's far from clear that new bilateral negotiations, which Trump has proposed, would secure as good a deal for US IP owners. Erstling, who served in Geneva with the World Intellectual Property Organization, can speak to IP provisions of NAFTA and TPP. Chapter 17 of NAFTA, which deals with IP: http://www.sice.oas.org/trade/nafta/chap-171.asp Contact: Joshua Schneck, josh@snowcommunications.com Giacomo Santangelo Lecturer of Economics Fordham University Examples of Trump and NAFTA stories Santangelo has been interviewed on before include: 1) "Divisive policies will harm Trump's plans to grow economy," Feb. 1, 2017, San Francisco Chronicle (http://tinyurl.com/mye2ps3); 2) "Clinton's, Trump's opposition to trade pact dims growth prospects," Sept. 25, 2016, San Francisco Chronicle (http://tinyurl.com/mxtrqnx); 3) "Trade Talks," April 29, 2015, Arise America (http://tinyurl.com/mc6vwuq); 4) "Fast Track Fast Trade," April 26, 2015, Arise Review (http://tinyurl.com/mlg7jcu) Bio: http://legacy.fordham.edu/academics/programs_at_fordham_/economics/faculty/santangelo_bio_90598.asp Contact: Rachel Roman, rroman7@fordham.edu Mark David Witte Associate Professor of Economics and MBA Director College of Charleston Witte is available for interviews on the Trump administration's plan to renegotiate NAFTA, the trade impact of currency manipulation, and Mexican sugar and Mexican trucking issues concerning NAFTA. Contact: Mike Robertson, Robertsonm@cofc.edu Maia Linask Economics Professor University of Richmond Robins School of Business Linask's expertise is in international trade, and her research has examined the impact of free trade agreements on foreign direct investment and the factors that influence trade policy. She has studied the effect of trade policy on the Mexican auto market. In addition, she is a member of the International Trade and Finance Association. Bio: http://directory.richmond.edu/bios/mlinask/ Contact: Cynthia Price, Cprice2@richmond.edu Steve H. Hanke Professor of Applied Economics Co-Director, Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health, and the Study of Business Enterprise Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore Hanke is a senior fellow and director of the Troubled Currencies Project at the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C., a senior advisor at the Renmin University of China's International Monetary Research Institute in Beijing, a special counselor to the Center for Financial Stability in New York, a contributing editor atCentral Banking in London, and a contributor at Forbes. Hanke is also a member of the Charter Council of the Society of Economic Measurement and of Euromoney Country Risk's Experts Panel. In the past, Hanke taught economics at the Colorado School of Mines and at the University of California, Berkeley. He served as a member of the Governor's Council of Economic Advisers in Maryland, as a senior economist on President Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers, and as a senior advisor to the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. Hanke served as a state counselor to both the Republic of Lithuania and the Republic of Montenegro. He was also an advisor to the presidents of Bulgaria, Venezuela and Indonesia. He played an important role in establishing new currency regimes in Argentina, Estonia, Bulgaria, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Ecuador, Lithuania, and Montenegro. He has also held senior appointments in the governments of many other countries, including Albania, Kazakhstan, the United Arab Emirates, and Yugoslavia. His most recent books are "Zimbabwe: Hyperinflation to Growth" (2008), "A Blueprint for a Safe, Sound Georgian Lari" (2010), "Juntas Monetarias para Paises en Desarollo" (2015), and "Currency Boards for Developing Countries: A Handbook" (2015). Contact: Jill Rosen, jrosen@jhu.edu Following are links to job listings for staff and freelance writers, editors and producers. You can view these and more job listings on our Job Board: https://prnmedia.prnewswire.com/community/jobs/ Following are links to other news and resources we think you might find useful. If you have an item you think other reporters would be interested in and would like us to include in a future alert, please drop us a line. PROFNET is an exclusive service of PR Newswire. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/profnet-experts-available-on-nafta-iran-elections-more-300463409.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals in under-resourced communities around the world to receive access to the latest clinical information Philadelphia, PA, May 25, 2017 - Elsevier, the information analytics company specializing in science and health, will add ClinicalKey to its global research and health resources available through Research4Life starting in June 2017. The expansion of the Research4Life access program with ClinicalKey benefits healthcare professionals in under-resourced, low- and middle-income communities around the globe. ClinicalKey is Elsevier's premier clinical search engine, providing access to the most current scientific and medical information, and it will help Research4Life meet the 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) declaration that health policies and practices globally should be informed by the best research evidence. "In 2012 the WHO Strategy on Research declared that health policies and practices globally should be informed by the best research evidence - and so we are delighted that ClinicalKey will help us grow the evidence-based medicine materials available for low- and middle-income countries through Hinari and provide an expanded basis for the informed decision-making of practitioners and policymakers," said Kimberly Parker, Hinari Programme Manager. Hinari is part of the Research4Life program managed by the WHO, in partnership with Yale University, and provides access to health and medical research. As a founding partner of Research4Life, Elsevier contributes more than a quarter of the 77,000 peer-reviewed journals, books and scholarly databases that are available through the program. Access to ClinicalKey adds to an existing collection of research resources offered by Elsevier, including ScienceDirect and Scopus. Elsevier also provides technical, strategic and communications expertise to help advance and promote Research4Life. Dr. Kristina Krohn, Health Frontiers Field Representative in Laos, said she was gratified to see how the Lao doctors reacted the first time they had access to medical journal articles through Hinari. "The Lao resident doctors devoured everything," said Dr. Krohn. "Hopefully ClinicalKey can help them sort through the medical literature without getting overwhelmed by the sheer amount of information available." Dr. John Danaher, President of Clinical Solutions at Elsevier, said, "Making ClinicalKey available to doctors and nurses in developing countries through Research4Life will help those medical professionals utilize the latest evidence-based clinical information to achieve the best outcomes for their patients." Adding ClinicalKey to Research4Life follows Elsevier's recent agreement to provide ClinicalKey to Doctors without Borders and strengthens Elsevier's commitment to the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals. Research4Life is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes - Research for Health (Hinari), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) - have provided researchers at some 8000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to 77,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences. http://www. Elsevier is a global information analytics company that helps institutions and professionals progress science, advance healthcare and improve performance for the benefit of humanity. Elsevier provides digital solutions and tools in the areas of strategic research management, R&D performance, clinical decision support, and professional education; including ScienceDirect, Scopus, ClinicalKey and Sherpath. Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, more than 35,000 e-book titles and many iconic reference works, including Gray's Anatomy. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a global provider of information and analytics for professionals and business customers across industries. http://www.

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