Time filter

Source Type

News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

Ovarian cancer is diagnosed with the help of pelvic examination, blood test, ultrasound and other tests such as MRI, PET and CT. Lack of early warning symptoms and early diagnostic tests for detection are the major causes of high rate of death due to ovarian cancer. It is one of the common causes of cancer death in women. According to World Cancer Research Fund International, in 2012, 239,000 new cases of ovarian cancer were detected. Globally, it constitutes about 1.7% of all cancer cases in 2012. Inherited gene mutation, estrogen hormone replacement therapy, polycystic ovary syndrome and fertility treatment may increase risk of ovarian cancer. Some of the complications in ovarian cancer is it can spread to other organs such as abdominal cavity, pelvis and abdominal lymph nodes, bones, liver, brain and sac surrounding the lymph nodes. The treatment of ovarian cancer is based on the stage of the disease. The treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and biological therapy. Ovarian cancer is most chemo-sensitive cancer. The chemotherapy drugs are more effective when given in combination with radiation therapy. Ovarian cancer is a type of cancer that begins in the ovaries. Ovarian cancer is the most common type of cancer among women. Epithelial tumor, stromal tumor and germ cell tumors are the type of ovarian cancer. Pelvic discomfort, abdominal pressure, urinary urgency, swelling, low back pain, loss of appetite, change in bladder habits and lack of energy are some of the sign and symptoms for the ovarian cancer. North America dominates the global market for ovarian cancer due to large number of aging population. Asia is expected to show high growth rates in the next five years in the global ovarian cancer market. China and India are expected to be the fastest growing ovarian cancer markets in Asia-Pacific region. Some of the key driving forces for ovarian cancer market in emerging countries are rise in healthcare expenditure, large pool of patients and rising government funding. In recent times there is increased in ovarian cancer due to increasing aging population of women. Increasing prevalence of ovarian cancer, introduction of new drugs and therapies, increase in healthcare expenditure and increased government funding are some of the key factors driving the growth for global ovarian cancer market. In addition, increasing healthcare awareness is also fuelling the growth of global ovarian cancer market. However, subsequent launch of generic drugs and patent expiration of blockbuster drugs, such as Taxol, Gemzar, Paraplatin and Hycamtin are some of the major factors restraining the growth for global ovarian cancer market. Lack of accurate diagnosis of ovarian cancer could lead a challenge for the global ovarian cancer market. Some of the trends for the global ovarian cancer market are increasing in funding activity and use of combination therapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Some of the major companies operating in the global ovarian cancer market are Bristol Myers Squibb Company, Eli Lilly and Company, GlaxoSmithKline plc, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Novogen, Inc., Genentech Inc., Aetera Zenteris Inc., Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH and F. Hoffman-La Roche Ltd.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Johns Hopkins Medicine specialists report they have developed a urine test for the likely emergence of cervical cancer that is highly accurate compared to other tests based on genetic markers derived directly from cervical tissue. The new urine test, they say, is different because it analyzes not only multiple sources of human cellular DNA altered by precancerous changes, but also DNA from HPV that is sexually transmitted and causes virtually all cases of the disease. In a proof-of-concept study, described online in Cancer Prevention Research on November 8, the investigators say their genetic markers test showed a "sensitivity" or accuracy rate of 90.9 percent in identifying so-called CIN2 lesions -- cervical lesions with abnormal cells likely to not only develop into cancer, but also to develop into cancers likely to spread. Additionally, they demonstrated that the DNA for all three human genes and one viral gene could be successfully extracted from urine, and they could identify such lesions with 75 percent sensitivity. Two commercial tests based on markers of DNA chemical changes called methylation, released in Europe last summer, require Pap smears or swabs of cervical tissue, and show 64 percent sensitivity in identifying similar lesions, according to senior investigator Rafael Guerrero-Preston, Dr.P.H., M.P.H., assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. "If further studies confirm these findings, we see a significant use of urine screening as a way to quickly and inexpensively determine if a biopsy is warranted, or if physicians can use a 'watch and wait' approach before intervening," says Guerrero-Preston. Typically, he says, a woman who tests positive for HPV and has an abnormal Pap smear undergoes a biopsy to rule out cervical cancer using cells taken directly from cervical tissue. But previous studies suggest more than 50 percent of these biopsies are unnecessary and can result in pain, worry, infertility and higher health care costs. "Our urine test would serve as a molecular triage," he says, "at times supplementing Pap test information. In developing countries that don't have the money, medical infrastructure or cultural approval for Pap test, our test could be used instead." The new study builds on the Johns Hopkins team's previously published work, in which investigators identified three genes associated with cervical cancer or abnormal-looking cells known to become cancerous: FKBP6, INTS1 and ZNF516. As abnormalities progress, these genes were more likely to have a chemical methyl group attached to their DNA in certain spots. The researchers tested the value of these genes as markers using 214 cervical cell samples collected from women undergoing Pap smears at Hospital Dr. Hernan Henriquez Aravena in Chile. The women ranged in age from 18 to 86. Among the test samples, 34 showed no abnormalities in their cervix; 87 showed one of three types of precancerous, abnormal tissue; and 90 showed clear evidence of cervical cancer. Next, Guerrero-Preston's team isolated DNA from each cervical tissue sample and used advanced genetic sequencing methods to spell out the DNA makeup of cells in the cervical tissue samples. The researchers then compared the number of methyl groups attached to each gene in samples from the 34 healthy women to 53 samples with a specific subset of precancerous markers. Using methylation as a value to diagnose malignancy, the three genes together showed a 90 percent sensitivity, meaning that their presence was able to predict a true positive cancer sample this percentage of the time. The test had an 88.9 percent specificity, meaning the percent of time the test correctly identified someone without the disease. To further improve the accuracy of the test, the investigators added a new gene marker to the test. This time, rather than using a human gene, they used one from the virus, HPV16-L1, which also becomes methylated in human cells as cancer develops. They did the test again with the four-gene combination on a new population of women from the University of Puerto Rico. The 115 women ranged in age from 21 to 49; 41 participants had healthy cervical tissue, and 74 had one of three types of precancerous cells. Using all four genes, the test now had a sensitivity of 90.9 percent and a specificity of 60.9 percent. "When developing a new cancer screening test, we want something in the range of 90 to 95 percent sensitivity, which is competitive with the effectiveness of tests developed and now marketed in Europe," says Guerrero-Preston. The next step, the researchers report, was to verify that the four-gene test worked using freely circulating DNA from blood and urine, rather than DNA taken directly from cervical tissue. For this experiment, they tested 40 samples of paired cervical tissue, blood and urine from a subset of the patients from Puerto Rico. Using the DNA from blood, they found the test had an 85.7 percent sensitivity and a 60.9 percent specificity. Using urine, they found a 75 percent sensitivity and an 83.3 percent specificity. During the course of the study, the time to process cervical samples, blood or urine and get a test result took four days. They plan to continue modifying the test to improve the urine sensitivity to that of the cervical tissue samples. According to World Cancer Research Fund International, 84 percent of cervical cancers occur in less developed countries, with the highest rates in Africa, Latin American and the Caribbean. In the United States, cervical cancer used to be the highest cause of cancer deaths among women, but that soon changed when the yearly Pap smear was introduced over 40 years ago. Countries without the infrastructure or cultural acceptance for regular Pap tests have not seen declining cancer rates. Guerrero-Preston and his colleagues have a research agreement with Cepheid to develop a way to reduce the waiting time for a test result from a maximum of four days in the lab to under three hours in a Cepheid instrument using sealed cartridges to minimize sample handling and contamination. Additional authors on the study include Blanca Valle, Anne Jedlicka, Nitesh Turaga, Oluwasina Folawiyo, Francesca Pirini, Fahcina Lawson, Angelo Vergura, Maartje Noorhuis, Amanda Dziedzic, Gabriela Perez, Marisa Renehan, Carolina Guerrero-Diaz, Bruce Trock Liliana Florea and David Sidransky of The Johns Hopkins University; Edgar De Jesus Rodriguez, Jose Rodriguez Orengo, Keimari Mendez and Josefina Romaguera of the University of Puerto Rico; and Teresa Diaz-Montes of the Institute for Cancer Care at Mercy. The research was funded by National Cancer Institute grants (U01 CA084986, K01 CA164092 and U01 CA084986).


New Studies Demonstrate Value of Gene Expression Risk Profiling to Identify Ultra-High-Risk Multiple Myeloma Patients ROTTERDAM, Netherlands and LAGUNA HILLS, California, Nov. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- SkylineDx today announced the presentation of new data that demonstrate the prognostic value of MMprofiler™ SKY92 gene signature, a gene expression profiling test for multiple myeloma (MM), as part of an integrated approach to identifying patients at ultra-high risk of MM. The data will be presented in a poster session on Monday, December 5, at the 58th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Diego, CA. "The data being presented at the ASH meeting suggest that gene expression testing with MMprofiler, when used in combination with molecular genetic risk profiling, can enable risk stratification in multiple myeloma by elucidating patterns of survival and disease progression in high-risk and ultra-high-risk patients," said Dharminder S. Chahal, Chief Executive Officer of SkylineDx. "An integrated profiling testing strategy, with MMprofiler as a key component, may thus facilitate evaluation of risk-stratified treatment approaches in patients with multiple myeloma, and may even help identify potentially beneficial therapies for patients at ultra-high risk." In the ASH poster presentation, researchers will describe how they used MMprofiler, along with a molecular genetic risk profiling tool, to assess 221 newly diagnosed patients with MM who participated in the UK NCRI Myeloma XI trial. SKY92 is a prognostic gene signature that determines the level of risk for patients with MM by classifying them into a "high" or "standard" risk group. Included in a growing number of international treatment guidelines, MMprofiler assesses risk by measuring the activity of 92 MM-related genes that comprise SKY92, the novel, proprietary gene signature that is the lead product of SkylineDx. Patients with a high-risk classification have a poor prognosis as compared to patients with a standard risk profile, regardless of treatment. The performance of the SKY92 gene signature to risk-stratify these patients exceeds that of standard clinical parameters that include fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and earlier gene expression signatures utilized in myeloma. The following posters related to SKY92 will be presented Monday, December 5, from 6:00-8:00pm PST in Hall GH of the San Diego Convention Center: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a cancer that arises from plasma cells, a type of white blood cell made in the bone marrow. In patients with MM, the plasma cells become abnormal, multiply uncontrollably, and release only one type of antibody – known as M-protein – which has no useful function. It is often through the measurement of M-protein that MM is diagnosed and monitored. Most medical problems related to MM are caused by the build-up of abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow and the presence of the M-protein in the blood or urine. The most common symptoms of MM include bone pain, recurring infection, kidney damage, and fatigue. According to the World Cancer Research Fund International, an estimated 114,000 people around the world are diagnosed with MM annually, and the disease represents 0.8% of all cancers globally. For more information about MM, visit www.hematon.nl/myeloom (information available in Dutch only), www.themmrf.org, www.myeloma.org.uk, www.mpeurope.org, www.myeloma.org, and www.jsm.gr.jp. MMprofiler SKY92 prognostic gene signature assesses risk by measuring the activity of 92 MM-related genes that comprise SKY92, the novel, proprietary gene signature. The lead product of SkylineDx, MMprofiler is proven superior to the biomarkers currently used to risk stratify newly diagnosed and relapsed multiple myeloma patients into a "high" or "standard" risk category.1 Included in a growing number of international treatment guidelines, MMprofiler is CE-IVD registered in Europe and will be coming soon as a laboratory-developed test (LDT) in the United States. For more information, please visit www.mmprofiler.com. About SkylineDx SkylineDx is a commercial-stage biotech company based in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Originally a spin-off of the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the company specializes in the development and marketing of innovative gene signature-based prognostic tests to assist healthcare professionals in making personalized treatment decisions for individual patients. These tests are designed to accurately determine the type or status of the disease or to predict a patient's response to a specific treatment. Based on the test results, healthcare professionals can tailor the treatment to the individual patient. MMprofiler is the company's lead product. To learn more, please visit www.skylinedx.com. 1 Van Beers EH, et al. SKY92 GEP, iFISH, and ISS comparisons for risk stratification in multiple myeloma. Poster p661 presented at 2015 European Hematology Association Congress.


Hawkes C.,World Cancer Research Fund International | Smith T.G.,University of Otago | Jewell J.,World Cancer Research Fund International | Wardle J.,University College London | And 4 more authors.
The Lancet | Year: 2015

Prevention of obesity requires policies that work. In this Series paper, we propose a new way to understand how food policies could be made to work more effectively for obesity prevention. Our approach draws on evidence from a range of disciplines (psychology, economics, and public health nutrition) to develop a theory of change to understand how food policies work. We focus on one of the key determinants of obesity: diet. The evidence we review suggests that the interaction between human food preferences and the environment in which those preferences are learned, expressed, and reassessed has a central role. We identify four mechanisms through which food policies can affect diet: providing an enabling environment for learning of healthy preferences, overcoming barriers to the expression of healthy preferences, encouraging people to reassess existing unhealthy preferences at the point-of-purchase, and stimulating a food-systems response. We explore how actions in three specific policy areas (school settings, economic instruments, and nutrition labelling) work through these mechanisms, and draw implications for more effective policy design. We find that effective food-policy actions are those that lead to positive changes to food, social, and information environments and the systems that underpin them. Effective food-policy actions are tailored to the preference, behavioural, socioeconomic, and demographic characteristics of the people they seek to support, are designed to work through the mechanisms through which they have greatest effect, and are implemented as part of a combination of mutually reinforcing actions. Moving forward, priorities should include comprehensive policy actions that create an enabling environment for infants and children to learn healthy food preferences and targeted actions that enable disadvantaged populations to overcome barriers to meeting healthy preferences. Policy assessments should be carefully designed on the basis of a theory of change, using indicators of progress along the various pathways towards the long-term goal of reducing obesity rates. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Roberto C.A.,Harvard University | Swinburn B.,University of Auckland | Hawkes C.,World Cancer Research Fund International | Huang T.T.-K.,City University of New York | And 8 more authors.
The Lancet | Year: 2015

Despite isolated areas of improvement, no country to date has reversed its obesity epidemic. Governments, together with a broad range of stakeholders, need to act urgently to decrease the prevalence of obesity. In this Series paper, we review several regulatory and non-regulatory actions taken around the world to address obesity and discuss some of the reasons for the scarce and fitful progress. Additionally, we preview the papers in this Lancet Series, which each identify high-priority actions on key obesity issues and challenge some of the entrenched dichotomies that dominate the thinking about obesity and its solutions. Although obesity is acknowledged as a complex issue, many debates about its causes and solutions are centred around overly simple dichotomies that present seemingly competing perspectives. Examples of such dichotomies explored in this Series include personal versus collective responsibilities for actions, supply versus demand-type explanations for consumption of unhealthy food, government regulation versus industry self-regulation, top-down versus bottom-up drivers for change, treatment versus prevention priorities, and a focus on undernutrition versus overnutrition. We also explore the dichotomy of individual versus environmental drivers of obesity and conclude that people bear some personal responsibility for their health, but environmental factors can readily support or undermine the ability of people to act in their own self-interest. We propose a reframing of obesity that emphasises the reciprocal nature of the interaction between the environment and the individual. Today's food environments exploit people's biological, psychological, social, and economic vulnerabilities, making it easier for them to eat unhealthy foods. This reinforces preferences and demands for foods of poor nutritional quality, furthering the unhealthy food environments. Regulatory actions from governments and increased efforts from industry and civil society will be necessary to break these vicious cycles. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Johns Hopkins Medicine specialists report they have developed a urine test for the likely emergence of cervical cancer that is highly accurate compared to other tests based on genetic markers derived directly from cervical tissue. The new urine test, they say, is different because it analyzes not only multiple sources of human cellular DNA altered by precancerous changes, but also DNA from HPV that is sexually transmitted and causes virtually all cases of the disease. In a proof-of-concept study, described online in Cancer Prevention Research on November 8, the investigators say their genetic markers test showed a "sensitivity" or accuracy rate of 90.9 percent in identifying so-called CIN2 lesions -- cervical lesions with abnormal cells likely to not only develop into cancer, but also to develop into cancers likely to spread. Additionally, they demonstrated that the DNA for all three human genes and one viral gene could be successfully extracted from urine, and they could identify such lesions with 75 percent sensitivity. Two commercial tests based on markers of DNA chemical changes called methylation, released in Europe last summer, require Pap smears or swabs of cervical tissue, and show 64 percent sensitivity in identifying similar lesions, according to senior investigator Rafael Guerrero-Preston, Dr.P.H., M.P.H., assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. "If further studies confirm these findings, we see a significant use of urine screening as a way to quickly and inexpensively determine if a biopsy is warranted, or if physicians can use a 'watch and wait' approach before intervening," says Guerrero-Preston. Typically, he says, a woman who tests positive for HPV and has an abnormal Pap smear undergoes a biopsy to rule out cervical cancer using cells taken directly from cervical tissue. But previous studies suggest more than 50 percent of these biopsies are unnecessary and can result in pain, worry, infertility and higher health care costs. "Our urine test would serve as a molecular triage," he says, "at times supplementing Pap test information. In developing countries that don't have the money, medical infrastructure or cultural approval for Pap test, our test could be used instead." The new study builds on the Johns Hopkins team's previously published work, in which investigators identified three genes associated with cervical cancer or abnormal-looking cells known to become cancerous: FKBP6, INTS1 and ZNF516. As abnormalities progress, these genes were more likely to have a chemical methyl group attached to their DNA in certain spots. The researchers tested the value of these genes as markers using 214 cervical cell samples collected from women undergoing Pap smears at Hospital Dr. Hernan Henriquez Aravena in Chile. The women ranged in age from 18 to 86. Among the test samples, 34 showed no abnormalities in their cervix; 87 showed one of three types of precancerous, abnormal tissue; and 90 showed clear evidence of cervical cancer. Next, Guerrero-Preston's team isolated DNA from each cervical tissue sample and used advanced genetic sequencing methods to spell out the DNA makeup of cells in the cervical tissue samples. The researchers then compared the number of methyl groups attached to each gene in samples from the 34 healthy women to 53 samples with a specific subset of precancerous markers. Using methylation as a value to diagnose malignancy, the three genes together showed a 90 percent sensitivity, meaning that their presence was able to predict a true positive cancer sample this percentage of the time. The test had an 88.9 percent specificity, meaning the percent of time the test correctly identified someone without the disease. To further improve the accuracy of the test, the investigators added a new gene marker to the test. This time, rather than using a human gene, they used one from the virus, HPV16-L1, which also becomes methylated in human cells as cancer develops. They did the test again with the four-gene combination on a new population of women from the University of Puerto Rico. The 115 women ranged in age from 21 to 49; 41 participants had healthy cervical tissue, and 74 had one of three types of precancerous cells. Using all four genes, the test now had a sensitivity of 90.9 percent and a specificity of 60.9 percent. "When developing a new cancer screening test, we want something in the range of 90 to 95 percent sensitivity, which is competitive with the effectiveness of tests developed and now marketed in Europe," says Guerrero-Preston. The next step, the researchers report, was to verify that the four-gene test worked using freely circulating DNA from blood and urine, rather than DNA taken directly from cervical tissue. For this experiment, they tested 40 samples of paired cervical tissue, blood and urine from a subset of the patients from Puerto Rico. Using the DNA from blood, they found the test had an 85.7 percent sensitivity and a 60.9 percent specificity. Using urine, they found a 75 percent sensitivity and an 83.3 percent specificity. During the course of the study, the time to process cervical samples, blood or urine and get a test result took four days. They plan to continue modifying the test to improve the urine sensitivity to that of the cervical tissue samples. According to World Cancer Research Fund International, 84 percent of cervical cancers occur in less developed countries, with the highest rates in Africa, Latin American and the Caribbean. In the United States, cervical cancer used to be the highest cause of cancer deaths among women, but that soon changed when the yearly Pap smear was introduced over 40 years ago. Countries without the infrastructure or cultural acceptance for regular Pap tests have not seen declining cancer rates. Guerrero-Preston and his colleagues have a research agreement with Cepheid to develop a way to reduce the waiting time for a test result from a maximum of four days in the lab to under three hours in a Cepheid instrument using sealed cartridges to minimize sample handling and contamination.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PULLMAN, Wash. - Scientists at Washington State University and Johns Hopkins Medical School have discovered a fast, noninvasive method that could lead to the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Using ultrasensitive, high-speed technology, the researchers identified a suite of molecules in the feces of mice that signifies the presence of precancerous polyps. This "metabolic fingerprint" matches changes in both mouse and human colon tumor tissues and suggests a potential new diagnostic tool for early detection of colorectal cancer in a clinical setting. Herbert Hill, WSU Regents professor, and graduate student Michael Williams conducted the study in collaboration with Raymond Reeves, WSU School of Molecular Biosciences, and Linda Resar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The findings were reported this month in the Journal of Proteome Research. Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide. Nearly 1.4 million new cases were diagnosed in 2012, according to the World Cancer Research Fund International. It is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. Though early detection is key to successful treatment, most screening tests are limited in diagnostic capability or ease of application. Colonoscopy, for example, is a known lifesaver but is costly and unappealing to many people who might otherwise undergo testing. Decreasing the invasiveness of the procedure could help. Williams said more people would be willing to provide a stool sample than undergo a biopsy through a colonoscope. In addition, colonoscopes can only extend a limited distance into the large intestine, potentially missing some polyps. "With our new test, it could be possible to diagnose cancer occurring throughout the entire colon," he said. Hill and Williams discovered the molecular fingerprint for colon cancer using a technology called ion mobility-mass spectrometry. IMMS is found in sensor devices worldwide that sniff out illicit drugs, chemical warfare agents and explosives in airports. Hill has been an innovator in the field for nearly 40 years. In this case, IMMS was coupled with ultraperformance liquid chromatography. The researchers first identified metabolic products from normal colon tissue in both humans and mice. IMMS can measure hundreds of metabolites simultaneously, such as enzymes, fats, glucose and amino acids. The scientists then compared this normal profile to that found in cancerous colon tissues from humans and research mice with polyps in their colons that mimic those in humans. In both cases, the scientists found that colon cancer caused significant changes in fat metabolism, especially for lipids and fatty acids. These abnormalities created a molecular fingerprint that was similar in humans and mice, said Hill. Diagnostic changes in the feces Next, Hill and Williams examined droppings from transgenic and control mice to see if the molecular fingerprint could be found in feces as well. Indeed IMMS detected many of the same metabolic abnormalities seen in the previous study and could clearly distinguish between healthy mice and those with colorectal cancer. "The feces was not exactly the same as the tissue samples, but it had a lot of similarities to the tissue," said Hill. "We found the lipids and fatty acids were changing -- and there were also changes in the amino acids." Specifically, an important class of fats called lysophospholipids changed dramatically, said Williams. "These types of lipids are known to be important in the development of cancer and are particularly tied to colorectal cancer." All of which is encouraging to Hill and Williams as they search for a more user-friendly method to diagnose colorectal cancer in the early stages. "The benefit of early detection is that we can catch cancer before it metastasizes to other parts of the body," said Williams. "Our results represent the zero stage of cancer, the polyp stage - as early as colon cancer can be detected." "The exciting part is being able to see differences in the stool," said Hill. "This could lead to a noninvasive, more comprehensive early-warning detection method for colorectal cancer, but a lot of research needs to be done before it can be actually realized." Their next step, if funded, is to evaluate human stool samples to see if the molecular fingerprint is present with colorectal cancer in people. Hill said the laboratory equipment needed to run these diagnostic tests is already commercially available.


Sarasota, FL, Dec. 13, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Zion Research has published a new report titled “Computer Aided Detection Market by Imaging Modalities (Magnetic, Resonance Imaging, Mammography, Ultrasound Imaging, Tomosynthesis, Computed Tomography and Others) for Oncology, Cardiovascular and Neurological Indications: Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis and Forecast, 2015 – 2021”. According to the report, global computer aided detection market was valued at around USD 450.0 million in 2015 and is expected to generate revenue of approximately USD 770.0 million by end of 2021, growing at a CAGR of around 9.5% between 2016 and 2021. Computer aided detection (CAD) is a technology designed to analyze a radiographic finding to estimate the likelihood that the feature represents a specific disease process. The CAD is used to increase the detection of disease by reducing the false negative rate due to observational oversights. CAD helps to standardize breast MRI study analysis and provides customized reporting, designed to generate highly detailed breast MRI study reports that thoroughly and effectively communicate the extent of disease. Browse through 27 Market Tables and 19 Figures spread over 110 Pages and in-depth TOC on “Global Computer Aided Detection Market: By Size, Applications, Segments, Industry Share, Analysis and Forecast 2015-2021”. Growing incidence and prevalence of various chronic diseases such as cancer coupled with the aging population are key drivers for fueling the growth of computer aided detection market. As per the WHO report, cancer is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity across the globe. More than 12 million new cancer cases and 8.0 million cancer-related deaths in 2012, and the cases are projected to reach around 22 million within next two decades. Favorable reimbursement for breast cancer CAD solutions and its well-established identity as a supplement tool in the diagnosis of breast cancer is further expected to boost the market growth in the years to come. However, scarcity of healthcare IT professionals and high maintenance and service expenditure are some of the key restraints for the market. Nonetheless, the evolution of artificial intelligence (AI) to assist in the continuous development of CAD is expected to open up new growth opportunities in the near future. Based on product, the computer aided detection can be segmented into magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, ultrasound imaging, tomosynthesis, computed tomography and others. Among all products, mammography dominated the computer aided detection market owing to increasing prevalence of cancer, which is the lead cause of morbidity and mortality. For instance, according to the World Cancer Research Fund International, North America, and Oceania accounted for the highest breast cancer rate. Thus, this segment is also expected to be a fastest growing segment over the forecast period. Browse the full "Computer Aided Detection Market by Imaging Modalities (Magnetic, Resonance Imaging, Mammography, Ultrasound Imaging, Tomosynthesis, Computed Tomography and Others) for Oncology, Cardiovascular and Neurological Indications: Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Segment, Trends and Forecast, 2015 – 2021" report at https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/report/computer-aided-detection-market The computer aided detection market is segmented on the basis of key application including oncology, cardiovascular and neurological indications. Oncology segment includes breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, liver cancer, bone cancer and other cancer. Oncology was the largest application segment for computer aided detection market. The prostate cancer application segment is expected to increase at the fastest growth rate from 2016 to 2021. This can be attributed to the increasing number of regulatory approvals for various prostate cancer detection CAD solutions and the rising incidence of the disease. In terms of revenue, North America held the largest share of global computer aided detection market and is expected to dominate the market over the next few years. This growth is mainly due to advancement in technology and adoption of new trends in image analysis and pattern recognition algorithm to workflow management functions for the diseases and conditions. The U.S. held the most significant market for computer aided detection as it is a key innovation hub and leading companies in the segment have been conducting thorough R&D. Inquire more about this report @ https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/inquiry/computer-aided-detection-market In 2015, North America was followed by Europe in terms of revenue. Europe was the second largest regional market increasing chronic diseases. Moreover, the adoption of new technologies is expected to witness significant growth in the years to come. The growth in the market is led by rising awareness for health and rapid expansion of the healthcare industry. Asia Pacific is expected to be the fastest growing market in near future. This growth is mainly due to rise cost-effective technologies, demand for medical tourism, and government initiatives. Asia Pacific computer aided detection market is mainly driven by the increasing population, rising incidence rate of chronic diseases, coupled with the rising health awareness among people, especially in China and India. The Middle East & Africa regional market is expected to witness moderate growth in the near future. The growth is attributed to rapid growth in aging population coupled with health care awareness regarding the chronic disease. Latin America is another important regional market and is expected to experience significant growth over the forecast period. Increasing healthcare industry coupled with the adoption of new technology developed for computer aided detection in Brazil is anticipated to fuel market growth in Latin America. Some of the key players operating in this market include GE Healthcare, Agfa-Gevaert N.V., Fujifilm Medical Systems USA, Inc., Hologic, Inc., Samsung Medison Co. Ltd, and Philips Healthcare. This report segments the global computer aided detection market as follows: Zion Market Research is an obligated company. We create futuristic, cutting edge, informative reports ranging from industry reports, the company reports to country reports. We provide our clients not only with market statistics unveiled by avowed private publishers and public organizations but also with vogue and newest industry reports along with pre-eminent and niche company profiles. Our database of market research reports comprises a wide variety of reports from cardinal industries. Our database is been updated constantly in order to fulfill our clients with prompt and direct online access to our database. Keeping in mind the client’s needs, we have included expert insights on global industries, products, and market trends in this database. Last but not the least, we make it our duty to ensure the success of clients connected to us—after all—if you do well, a little of the light shines on us.


Hawkes C.,World Cancer Research Fund International | Jewell J.,World Cancer Research Fund International | Allen K.,World Cancer Research Fund International
Obesity Reviews | Year: 2013

Summary: This paper presents the NOURISHING framework of food policies to promote healthy diets, and uses the framework to summarize the policy actions taken by the Bellagio meeting countries. NOURISHING was developed by WCRF International to formalize a comprehensive policy package that brings together the key domains of action and policy areas. It aims to provide global level recommendations for a comprehensive response, within which policymakers have the flexibility to select specific policy options suitable for their national/local contexts and target populations. It also aims to provide a framework for reporting, categorizing and monitoring policy actions taken around the world, and for systematically categorizing, updating, interpreting and communicating the evidence for policy to policymakers. In this paper we explain the structure for NOURISHING and the rationale behind it. We also use the framework to report on and categorize the policy actions implemented in the Bellagio countries. © 2013 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Obesity.


Thompson R.,World Cancer Research Fund International
The journal of family health care | Year: 2010

The recommendations of a major report on dietary aspects of cancer prevention are summarised and discussed. The findings of The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF)/American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) Second Expert Report Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective were published in 2007 and remain valid. The Report reviewed the relationship between food, nutrition, physical activity, body fatness and 17 cancer sites. The goal of the Report was to review all the relevant research, using precise and reproducible methodologies. An expert panel reviewed the evidence. Based upon evidence that was graded "convincing" or "probable", a series of 10 recommendations to reduce the risk of developing cancer was produced. One of the most important factors is maintaining a healthy weight throughout life, which can be achieved by regular physical activity and limiting consumption of energy-dense foods and sugary drinks. Other important dietary measures include consuming a diet high in plant-based foods, limiting intakes of red meat, and avoiding salty foods and processed meat. Alcohol should be consumed in modest amounts, if at all. Dietary supplements are not recommended for cancer prevention.

Loading World Cancer Research Fund International collaborators
Loading World Cancer Research Fund International collaborators