Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Tata H.L.,Forest Research and Development Agency | Tata H.L.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | van Noordwijk M.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | Widayati A.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office
Agroforestry Systems | Year: 2015

As part of a broader pattern of recovery after decline called forest transition, tree cover and carbon stocks have increased through agroforestry systems in many parts of Indonesia. The associated tree diversity transition implies that only the most useful parts of local tree flora are promoted. Swampland jelutong, Dyera polyphylla, has been domesticated in peat areas Jambi province, Indonesia. We discuss jelutong domestication in two coastal districts, referring to seven steps in a gradual change from products collected from communal natural forests to specific genotypes managed on private farms. Domestication of D. polyphylla in Jambi was in the initial stages three decades ago, when jelutong latex was directly tapped from the trees in its natural habitat of peat swamp forests. Tapping jelutong latex stopped in 2005 following the national regulation taxing forest products. Some farmers then started jelutong cultivation, motivated by the profitability of trading jelutong latex in the past. Our on-farm study showed that jelutong can be planted in various mixed agroforestry systems, with rubber, coffee or oil palm as dominants. Planted jelutong with good farm management showed diameter growth rates of 1.3 to 1.9 cm year−1. On-farm trials showed that dolomite as soil ameliorant did not affect diameter growth, but had some effect on height. Jelutong planted between young oil palm had the best performance, while jelutong that was underplanted in mature rubber gardens grew slowly. Slow market revival currently constrains further tree domestication of jelutong. © 2015 The Author(s) Source


Tata H.L.,Forest Research and Development Agency | Tata H.L.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | van Noordwijk M.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | Jasnari,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | Widayati A.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office
Agroforestry Systems | Year: 2015

As part of a broader pattern of recovery after decline called forest transition, tree cover and carbon stocks have increased through agroforestry systems in many parts of Indonesia. The associated tree diversity transition implies that only the most useful parts of local tree flora are promoted. Swampland jelutong, Dyera polyphylla, has been domesticated in peat areas Jambi province, Indonesia. We discuss jelutong domestication in two coastal districts, referring to seven steps in a gradual change from products collected from communal natural forests to specific genotypes managed on private farms. Domestication of D. polyphylla in Jambi was in the initial stages three decades ago, when jelutong latex was directly tapped from the trees in its natural habitat of peat swamp forests. Tapping jelutong latex stopped in 2005 following the national regulation taxing forest products. Some farmers then started jelutong cultivation, motivated by the profitability of trading jelutong latex in the past. Our on-farm study showed that jelutong can be planted in various mixed agroforestry systems, with rubber, coffee or oil palm as dominants. Planted jelutong with good farm management showed diameter growth rates of 1.3 to 1.9 cm year−1. On-farm trials showed that dolomite as soil ameliorant did not affect diameter growth, but had some effect on height. Jelutong planted between young oil palm had the best performance, while jelutong that was underplanted in mature rubber gardens grew slowly. Slow market revival currently constrains further tree domestication of jelutong. © 2015 The Author(s) Source


Villamor G.B.,University of Bonn | Villamor G.B.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | Desrianti F.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | Akiefnawati R.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | And 2 more authors.
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change | Year: 2014

This study explores the role of gender as a factor in decision making about alternative land use options and in responses to new investment opportunities, which has received little attention to date. An observational study to determine the different factors affecting male and female decisions to change land use at the individual level in a forest margin landscape in Jambi (Sumatra, Indonesia) was combined with a set of role playing games (RPGs) designed to assess participant responses in a simulated social setting of women-only and men-only groups. The RPG included simulated agents offering new opportunities to convert or conserve agroforest. In the study area, rubber (Hevea braziliensis) agroforests that support high biodiversity and carbon storage are giving way to monoculture rubber and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantations. When women from both the upland and lowland villages played the RPGs, external investors proposing logging or oil palm conversion were approached very positively and the resulting land use change was more dynamic and extensive than in the equivalent men-only groups. Consequently, women outperformed men in achieving income targets. In lowland areas gender is strongly associated with land use change, while in the uplands the level of conservation awareness plays a more crucial role in the maintenance of rubber agroforests. Based on the data, and contrary to expectations and gender stereotypes, it is expected that the greater involvement of women in landscape level decision making will increase emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in the area, posing further challenges to efforts to reduce such emissions. © 2013 The Author(s). Source


Leimona B.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | van Noordwijk M.,World Agroforestry Center Southeast Asia Regional Office | de Groot R.,Wageningen University | Leemans R.,Wageningen University
Ecosystem Services | Year: 2015

Payment for ecosystem services (PES) is commonly defined as a market-based environmental policy instrument to efficiently achieve ecosystem services provision. However, an increasing body of literature shows that this prescriptive conceptualization of PES cannot be easily generalized and implemented in practice, and that the commodification of ecosystem services (ES) is problematic and may lead to unfair situations for relevant PES actors. This paper synthesizes case studies in Indonesia, the Philippines and Nepal to provide empirical observations on emerging PES mechanisms in Asia. Lessons learned show that fairness and efficiency objectives must be achieved simultaneously in designing and implementing a sustainable PES scheme, especially in developing country contexts. Neither fairness nor efficiency is a primary aim but an intermediate 'fairly efficient and efficiently fair' PES may bridge the gap between PES theory and practice to increase sustainable ES provision and improve livelihoods. © 2014 The Authors. Source

Discover hidden collaborations