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News Article | December 9, 2015
Site: cleantechnica.com

Laurent Fabius, COP21 president and France’s foreign minister, has just released version 1 of a draft text on COP21 agenda item 4 (b)—the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (decision 1/CP.17) at 3:00PM GMT. Read the text here. “We’ve made progress but still a lot of work remains to be done. Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.” Further detail from Fabius, according to Reuters: the document is shorter by about a third (14 pages) than the last draft, and two-thirds of the disputes over wording have been settled. This “constitutes progress,” Fabius said. US Secretary of State John Kerry buoyed the spirit of the conference by urging negotiators to ensure regular reporting from all countries, as “the only way to give both the private and public sectors confidence that the promises we’re making have weight behind them,” by announcing yet more money for countries to defend themselves against climate change, and by doubling US climate adaption grants to the most vulnerable countries to a total $860 million a year. Nozipho Joyce Mxakato-Diseko, the South African career diplomat who leads the large G77+China bloc and also participates in the BASIC coalition (Brazil, South Africa, India, and China), spoke to deceit from the wealthy nations in trying to divide the less advantaged group by giving aid only to the most vulnerable countries rather than helping all developing states. Prakash Javadekar, the Environment Minister of India, spoke to the value of continued dialogue and compromise: “I want to make it very clear that if everybody, all nations, keep a positive mindset, an accommodative spirit… then solution is possible, feasible, practical, and most acceptable.” Says Alden Meyer, director of strategy and policy at the Union of Concerned Scientists: “It’s encouraging to see a cleaner text that contains fewer brackets as a result of agreements being reached on issues like technology development and transfer and capacity building. However, the agreements on the core political issues—the long-term goal, review and revision of proposed national contributions, transparency, loss and damage, and finance—have yet to be resolved. “We’re now at the critical point of the negotiations. Over the next day or two, ministers need to rise above their differences to create a final agreement that rapidly transitions the world to a clean energy economy and allows us to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.” Still to be decided in the second meeting of the day: Resolution of these articles of the DRAFT AGREEMENT (now 14 pages) To hold the increase in the global average temperature to Option 1: below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels, Option 2: well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels [and to [rapidly] scale up global efforts to limit temperature increase to below 1.5 °C] [,while recognizing that in some regions and vulnerable ecosystems high risks are projected even for warming above 1.5 °C], Option 3: below 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, Option 1: Parties collectively aim to reach the global temperature goal referred to in Article 2 through [a peaking of global greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible, recognizing that peaking requires deeper cuts of emissions of developed countries and will be longer for developing countries; rapid reductions thereafter to [40– 70 per cent][70–95 per cent] below 2010 levels by 2050; toward achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions [by the end][after the middle] of the century] informed by best available science, on the basis of equity and in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication. Option 2: Parties collectively aim to reach the global temperature goal referred to in Article 2 through a long- term global low emissions [transformation toward [climate neutrality][decarbonization]] over the course of this century informed by best available science, on the basis of equity and in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication. Two options under “Differentiation” Three options under “Support” Option to retain language here or combine with Article 4 alongside adaptation provision 3 options under “Mobilization” 3 options under “Scale” 3 options under “Communication” “A transparency framework for action and support” 3 options, all taking in Parties’ different capacities Resolution of these articles of the DRAFT DECISION (now 15 pages): 2 Finance options 2 sets of options under “Technology Development And Transfer” Options for the Global Stocktake Options for Support under Workstream 2 The text also acknowledges and welcomes future support from civil society, the private sector, financial institutions, cities, and other subnational authorities; and local communities and indigenous peoples. Importantly, it gives a nod to carbon pricing at the end: “Also recognizes the important role of carbon-pricing in providing incentives for emission reduction activities.”    Get CleanTechnica’s 1st (completely free) electric car report → “Electric Cars: What Early Adopters & First Followers Want.”   Come attend CleanTechnica’s 1st “Cleantech Revolution Tour” event → in Berlin, Germany, April 9–10.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


Davies N.J.,Workstream | Batehup L.,Workstream
Journal of Cancer Survivorship | Year: 2011

Introduction: Due to growth in cancer survivorship and subsequent resource limitations, the current UK position of follow-up services is unsustainable. With people living longer after a cancer diagnosis, supported self-management for ongoing treatment-related chronic conditions is a fundamental component of aftercare services. Alternative models to traditional hospital aftercare require consideration in terms of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Methods: 'Evidence to Inform the Cancer Reform Strategy: The Clinical Effectiveness of Follow-Up Services after Treatment for Cancer' (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination 2007) has been updated using a number of quality-controlled databases. Correspondence with experts was also sought to identify current initiatives. Result: The review highlights a shift towards patient empowerment via individualised and group education programmes aimed at increasing survivor's ability to better manage their condition and the effects of treatment, allowing for self-referral or rapid access to health services when needed. The role of specialist nurses as key facilitators of supportive aftercare is emphasised, as is a move towards technology-based aftercare in the form of telephone or web-based services. Conclusions: The challenge will be replacing traditional clinic follow-up with alternative methods in a cost-effective way that is either as equally effective, or more so. To establish this, more rigorous trials are needed, with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up assessments. Implications for cancer survivors: Increasing patient confidence to initiate follow-up specific to their needs is likely to increase the workload of primary care providers, who will need training for this. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Trademark
Workstream | Date: 2015-02-10

Office furniture.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Geoff Connell appears on the CIO50 list for the second year running, in recognition of his work as CIO at the Borough of Newham and head of business systems at the Borough of Havering. The dual role came about in 2009, when Connell added the position at Havering to his existing responsibility for Newham's technology strategy. Since he took on the management of shared ICT services across the two east London boroughs, related operating costs have been reduced by £2m a year. Like many in his role, Connell has been called on to help the councils meet tough overall savings targets. Recently, he has undertaken a channel shift with a new website, customer-relationship management and integrated systems across three east London boroughs to deliver these. Connell is leader for the ICT Workstream for the East London Solutions group of six councils, which aim to share services across north-east London. He is also involved in the London Connects project to improve the management of ICT overheads in public-sector bodies in the capital. On top of this, he is chairman of the London branch of Socitm and is a board member of the Local CIO Council, which works with the central government CIO Council to align technology-related policies, standards and activities.


News Article | March 6, 2012
Site: techcrunch.com

Cloud collaboration company YouSendIt is debuting a new product today called Workstream. Designed specifically for enterprises, Workstream is a file sharing platform for businesses, and offers deeper integration with Microsoft SharePoint and helps users securely share content beyond the firewall and across mobile devices, desktops and the Web. For background, YouSendIt was one of the pioneers of file sharing, offering a service that mainly appealed to behind-the-firewall customers who were unable to send large files via email due to Microsoft Exchange limitations. Workstream integrates with Microsoft Active Directory and Outlook and aims to make, accessing, sharing and managing content between customers, suppliers or partners from inside and outside the firewall easier and more secure. The company also offers a SharePoint plug-in so users can seamlessly and securely share files externally with partners, customers and vendors straight from SharePoint. The file sharing platform has support for sharing across iPhone, iPad, Android, desktop (on Mac and Windows) and the Web. Workstream also enforces encryption on mobile devices and provides policies such as mobile application passcode enforcement and remote wipe of application data.


He’s a week into his job at YouSendIt and CEO Brad Garlinghouse doesn’t have an office yet. But he’s in no rush to claim a corner spot or a coveted windowed view at the company’s Campbell, Calif. headquarters just yet. "We have offices on three floors," Garlinghouse explains, "So each week I am going to spend time on a different floor, getting to know everyone." Garlinghouse is actually applying this laid back, wait-and-see approach to taking the reins in general. Citing YouSendIt’s current market leadership —its cloud-based filed sharing and collaboration platform has gathered over 30 million registered users and 585,000 paid subscribers since its launch in 2004—he tells Fast Company he’s not stressed. "We have a very robust product suite," he says noting the recently launched Workstream, the B2B content collaboration tool among others released over the past year. "The wind is at our back," he adds, "Because among ‘pro-sumers’ [professional or enterprise customers] YouSendIt is known as a good brand." As a veteran of both Yahoo! and more recently AOL, where Garlinghouse served as president of consumer applications and head of AOL’s Silicon Valley operations, he’s taking a moment to exhale. "When you come into a declining organization like AOL that is in turnaround mode, your tolerance and speed at making decisions is different," he says of leading the charge to expand flagging products such as AOL Mail and AIM globally. At YouSendIt, Garlinghouse says, there’s a different, but equally challenging, proposition. The startup "trainwreck" is barely visible in the rear view anymore, and the company's seen 60 and 61 percent revenue growth over the last two years. "If it’s not broken you have to be careful not to fix it," he says. Some executives may be eager to put their fingerprints all over their new company, but not him. "You want to be careful because you may end up doing harm. YouSendIt is growing very quickly and managing growth is the hardest thing." Growth is the reason he took the job, Garlinghouse says, rather than pursue the investor route like some other successful Silicon Valley execs (hello Reid Hoffman). A consultation with good friend Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, sealed the deal. "She said she always went with fast growth companies. They have a tendency to help hide other sins," he says. The Current Manifesto: Compete on Customer Outcomes, Not Cost Not that he’s suggesting there are lots of sins to hide. But how does YouSendIt stack up to Garlinghouse’s much-talked about "peanut butter manifesto" test? "Any organization can be more focused," he admits, referring to his 2006 memo when as then-SVP Yahoo! he called out the company for its lack of cohesive vision. "I’d give YouSendIt a B," he adds with a chuckle. YouSendIt’s product suite "almost by definition gets a good grade," he says, "But we could do better with clarity of purpose and messaging. There are aspects of our external communication that I’m not proud of." But that’s a lot easier to fix than problems with the underlying business, he says, which is not an issue he sees at YouSendIt. Garlinghouse says he’s also going to concentrate on customer outcomes rather than, say, changing YouSendIt’s pricing structure or seeking more funding (the company’s already raised nearly $50 million). Reiterating what he said at the TC Disrupt conference this week, Garlinghouse believes big funding doesn’t always equal success. He cited a TechCrunch article about Box.net having a billion dollar valuation. "One of the first [success] metrics was the money they raised," he says. Living through the first dotcom crash taught Garlinghouse that it’s not healthy for a company to raise as much as it can at the highest possible price. "Success is measured by customer outcomes. If you have very happy customers, the business side will take care of itself." Another thing he’s learned over the course of his career and from his entrepreneur father (and not in the halls of Harvard, where he got his MBA) is that its important to stay grounded to be a good leader. Though he’s been entrenched in Silicon Valley for years, Garlinghouse credits his removed-from-the-hype Midwestern upbringing with his ability to filter the noise that permeates Silicon Valley's tech scene. He’d rather build slowly and organically to ensure sustainable success. Likewise he goes back to his father’s advice about choosing the professor rather than the class. "It applies in business, too," he maintains, where its more important to follow a good leader rather than "work for a hot, sexy company run by a 26-year old who doesn’t know how to manage." Does slow and steady win the race? It remains to be seen. Right now, though, YouSendIt has its work cut out for it. The new Google Drive is lying in wait to make a big user grab, and Box is looking to own the enterprise space, counting 82% of Fortune 500 companies as customers. And while Dropbox doesn’t say how many paying subscribers it has, it’s currently boasting 50 million users and is a year ahead in translation in French, Spanish, German and Japanese. Garlinghouse concedes this is an area where YouSendIt needs to play catch up. Still, he remains unflappable and offers a quote from author Charles Swindoll as the mantra he’s already shared with the entire YouSendIt staff. "It goes something like: life is 10% what happens to me and 90% of how I react to it. We are in charge of our attitudes."


News Article | March 13, 2012
Site: www.techweekeurope.co.uk

YouSendIt’s Workstream file management and sharing tool allows businesses to transfer files among employees and with the outside world YouSendIt (YSI) last week launched its newest feature, Workstream, which is a customisable file management and sharing feature that gives businesses a way to transfer files among their own employees and also sharing them with partners, vendors and customers outside the company. YSI, which started out in 2004 as an alternative-to-email cloud service for sending and receiving large files, has graduated to a whole new business level. It is now being used in 98 percent of the Fortune 500 companies because it has morphed into a full-service enterprise service for doing file storage, file transfers, file syncing, digital signing, and other content-collaboration services. Workstream runs on virtually all the mainstream platforms, including Windows and Mac OS X desktops, Android phones and tablets, iPhones, and iPads. Most importantly for business, Workstream integrates directly with Microsoft SharePoint, Active Directory, and Outlook. Such a connection with SharePoint – the world’s most-utilised collaboration software – is important because it enables users to share content across departments without needing an intermediary web portal, which can be problematic with regard to firewalls and others security tools. Thanks to YSI, collaboration projects can be done – say, for partners or one-time customer needs – without the user having to add the outsiders to the corporate SharePoint deployment, which can be a time-consuming, even security-threatening, exercise. Since more and more enterprise workers are bringing work home, Workstream solves the security issue of moving documents across varying platforms and devices. Unlike PDFs, Workstream emables a user to control read/write permissions on documents and prevents final versions of documents from being overwritten. Although it has gone corporate, YSI maintains its business model of 2GB free accounts, YouSendIt CMO Tony Nemelka told eWEEK. “We had 34 million unique users during the past year, and they shared more than 100 million files,” Nemelka said. “We’re growing into new lines of business, but we’re not forgetting our roots.” Freely downloadable custom YSI applications are available for the iOS and Android devices at their respective appstores. Pricing for the enterprise versions of YSI are as follows: $12 (£8) per user/month up to $30 per user/month, depending upon the options selected. How well do you know the cloud? Take our quiz.


News Article | March 6, 2012
Site: www.wired.com

Yet another internet file-sharing service is making a big push into big businesses. On Tuesday, YouSendIt unveiled Workstream, a tool that gives businesses a means of not only transferring files among employees but sharing them with partners, vendors and customers outside the company. The tool plugs into SharePoint, Microsoft’s widely used collaboration platform. Workstream is designed for moving large files unsuited to email. “[Businesses] can’t do a lot of the email payloads that we allow to happen,” says Brian Curry, YouSendIt’s chief product officer. Integrating with Microsoft Active Directory, the tool also lets you control who has access to files and who doesn’t, encrypt and password-protect data on mobile devices, and remotely remove data from devices. Like Box.net and Dropbox, YouSendIt began life as a way for the Average Joe to send and store files via the net. And like those two much discussed startups, it has repackaged its technology for businesses. In addition to Workstream, the company sells for-pay versions of its free consumer service. This is a common story. Today, many startups are finding their way into businesses through the back door. Then they turn around and offer these businesses a means of overseeing the software their employees are already using. YouSendIt says its service has 28 million registered users in 193 countries. About 550,000 are paid subscribers, but the company says its tools already span 98 percent of the Fortune 500.


News Article | March 6, 2012
Site: www.wired.com

Early to the game for the Average Joe and Jane as an easy way to store and send files via the cloud, YouSendIt is buttoning up to enter the corporate world with Workstream. Caleb Garling reports for Wired Enterprise that by integrating with Microsoft’s Active Directory, Workstream lets users control who has access to files and who doesn’t, encrypt and password-protect data on mobile devices, and remotely remove data from devices. With its SharePoint plug-in and by integrating with Outlook, users can “seamlessly and securely share files externally with partners, customers and vendors straight from SharePoint,” YouSendIt said in its press release. YouSendIt seems wise to closely integrate with Microsoft. Box.net, on the other hand, is appealing to folks who may want to ditch SharePoint with its pure cloud-play. It looks like YouSendIt was reading the Dropbox forums with feature requests. Coaxion and the open-source DropBox for Sharepoint tool have stepped in to get integration going between Microsoft and DropBox — but many IT folk are sure to cry foul over using such tools. What I do not understand is why Microsoft is turning to YouSendIt rather than doing the service itself as a value-add for customers. It’s not clear if SharePoint Online or Office 365 offer similar functionality. Wouldn’t most IT types want to go with a complete solution rather than using a third-party? It seems in the age of the cloud, Microsoft should be all over this space. Agree/disagree? Discuss below…


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