Working Group on Animal Epidemiology

Marseille, France

Working Group on Animal Epidemiology

Marseille, France

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Mba P.A.,IRD Montpellier | Marie J.-L.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | Rolain J.-M.,IRD Montpellier | Davoust B.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | And 3 more authors.
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases | Year: 2011

A total of 155 fleas collected in 2009 in Lebanon from 16 cats (104 Ctenocephalides felis specimens, 1 C. canis specimen) and 2 dogs (50 C. canis specimens) were tested for the presence of Rickettsia spp. and Bartonella spp. using molecular methods, including real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), regular PCR, and sequencing of amplified PCR products. Rickettsia felis, the agent of the emerging flea-borne spotted fever in humans, was identified in 17 (16%) C. felis cat fleas. Bartonella henselae, an agent of cat scratch disease, was identified in three (2.9%) C. felis. Our results emphasize the potential risk of these emerging flea-borne infections in Lebanon. © 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Marie J.-L.,IRD Montpellier | Marie J.-L.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | Davoust B.,IRD Montpellier | Davoust B.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | And 6 more authors.
Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases | Year: 2012

The aim of our study was to detect the presence of . Rickettsia spp. and . Bartonella spp. in ticks and fleas collected from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in southeastern France during 2008. Using a genus-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, which was followed by a species-specific qPCR assay for the positive samples, 45.2% (33/73) of ticks (Rhipicephalus turanicus) were found to be infected with . Rickettsia massiliae. 10.5% (2/19) of the fleas (Archaeopsylla erinacei) collected in the study tested positive for . Rickettsia felis. A genus-specific qPCR assay did not reveal any . Bartonella species in any of the ticks or fleas collected. The role of red foxes in the epidemiology of spotted fever caused by . Rickettsiae species requires further investigation. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Aoun O.,Cabinet me dical | Lacour S.A.,Enva Laboratoire National Of Reference Afssa Lerpaz | Levieuge A.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | Marie J.-L.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Wildlife Diseases | Year: 2012

From 2006 to 2009 we screened 108 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 894 wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Haut-Var, France for Trichinella britovi infection. Prevalences were 2.7 and 0% respectively. The fox may be considered a predictive sentinel for Trichinella in the Haut-Var ecosystem. © Wildlife Disease Association 2012.


Mediannikov O.,Aix - Marseille University | Davoust B.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | Davoust B.,Aix - Marseille University | Socolovschi C.,Aix - Marseille University | And 3 more authors.
Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases | Year: 2012

Little is known about the prevalence of spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae in ticks and fleas in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In 2008, 12 Amblyomma compressum ticks were collected from 3 pangolins (Manis gigantea). Two Haemaphysalis punctaleachi ticks were collected from 2 African civets (Civettictis civetta congica), and one was collected from an antelope (Onotragus leche). A total of 111 Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, 23 Ctenocephalides canis fleas, 39 C. felis fleas, and 5 Trichodectes canis lice were sampled from 19 dogs. One C. canis flea was collected from a human. Six of the 12 A. compressum ticks were positive for rickettsial DNA, as determined by genus-specific qPCR. The ompA gene sequences amplified from positive samples showed 100% homology with Rickettsia africae (GenBank accession number CP001612). The detection of Ri. africae in A. compressum ticks, which are highly specialized parasites of pangolins, is consistent with our previous data showing the presence of Ri. africae in A. compressum ticks from Liberia. No other ticks contained rickettsial DNA. A total of 9 C. canis fleas (39%, 9/23) and 37 C. felis fleas (95%, 37/39) that was collected from dogs and one C. canis flea collected from a human harbored Ri. felis. © 2012 Elsevier GmbH.


Socolovschi C.,Aix - Marseille University | Gomez J.,Veterinary Practitioner | Marie J.-L.,Aix - Marseille University | Marie J.-L.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | And 5 more authors.
Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases | Year: 2012

Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia canis is distributed globally, but its prevalence in Africa is poorly known. In the study reported herein, 27% of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks collected from watchdogs in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, were positive for E. canis using quantitative real-time PCR. A new molecular strategy is proposed that can be used not only for epidemiological study, but also for the diagnosis of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Our findings show for the first time the presence of E. canis using molecular tools in the Ivory Coast, providing direct evidence for the presence of this pathogen. © 2012 Elsevier GmbH.


Marie J.-L.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Marie J.-L.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | Davoust B.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Davoust B.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | And 3 more authors.
Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases | Year: 2012

The European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) is a synanthropic nocturnal insectivore commonly found in the countryside and in the parks and gardens. Because hedgehogs are already involved in the transmission of a number of zoonoses, including salmonellosis and ringworm, we decided to study their possible role in the epidemiology of the spotted fever group of . Rickettsia. We collected ticks and fleas from a hedgehog that was captured in the city of Marseilles in France. Using a genus-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis followed by a species-specific qPCR analysis for positive samples, we observed that 91.7% (11/12) of the . Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks were positive for . Rickettsia massiliae and 99.2% (128/129) of the . Archaeopsylla erinacei fleas were positive for . Rickettsia felis. Hedgehogs carry infected ectoparasites and then likely ensure the dissemination of spotted fever group . Rickettsiae, and their epidemiological role requires further investigation. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Working Group on Animal Epidemiology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Ticks and tick-borne diseases | Year: 2012

Seventy-one Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) in the French Pyrenees were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the presence of Rickettsia and Bartonella. Four ticks (6%) were positive for R. helvetica. The chamois carries infected ticks, and this enables the dissemination throughout the environment with this bacterium, a potential human pathogen.


Davoust B.,Working Group on Animal Epidemiology | Davoust B.,Aix - Marseille University | Socolovschi C.,Aix - Marseille University | Gibert P.,Veterinaire consultant de lOffice national de la chasse et de la faune sauvage | And 4 more authors.
Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases | Year: 2012

Seventy-one Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) in the French Pyrenees were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the presence of Rickettsia and Bartonella. Four ticks (6%) were positive for R. helvetica. The chamois carries infected ticks, and this enables the dissemination throughout the environment with this bacterium, a potential human pathogen. © 2012 Elsevier GmbH.

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