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Ayrilmis N.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Jarusombuti S.,Istanbul University | Fueangvivat V.,Kasetsart University | Bauchongkol P.,Kasetsart University | White R.H.,Wood Research and Development Office
Fibers and Polymers | Year: 2011

In this study, physical, mechanical, and flammability properties of coconut fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP) composite panels were evaluated. Four levels of the coir fiber content (40, 50, 60, and 70 % based on the composition by weight) were mixed with the PP powder and a coupling agent, 3 wt % maleic anhydride grafted PP (MAPP) powder. The water resistance and the internal bond strength of the composites were negatively influenced by increasing coir fiber content. However, the flexural strength, the tensile strength, and the hardness of the composites improved with increasing the coir fiber content up to 60 wt %. The flame retardancy of the composites improved with increasing coir fiber content. The results suggest that an optimal composite panel formulation for automotive interior applications is a mixture of 60 wt % coir fiber, 37 wt % PP powder, and 3 wt % MAPP. © 2011 The Korean Fiber Society and Springer Netherlands. Source


Ayrilmis N.,Istanbul University | Jarusombuti S.,Kasetsart University | Fueangvivat V.,Wood Research and Development Office | Bauchongkol P.,Wood Research and Development Office
Journal of Tropical Forest Science | Year: 2011

This study evaluated effects of thermal treatment of rubberwood fibres at elevated temperatures on physical and mechanical properties of medium density fibreboard (MDF). MDF panels were manufactured from untreated rubberwood fibres and fibres treated at three different temperatures (120, 150 or 180 °C) for 15 or 30 min in a laboratory autoclave. The thickness swelling of the panels decreased with increasing treatment temperature and time while mechanical properties, flexural properties, internal bond strength and screw withdrawal resistance, decreased. Results of the internal bond strength showed that thermal treatment of rubberwood fibres increased the hydrophobicity of fibre surfaces, which reduced the adhesion and penetration of the ureaformaldehyde resin. In general, all panel types met the general purpose use requirements of EN standards. MDF panels made from thermally-treated rubberwood fibres at 180°C for 30 min appeared to be a practical choice for applications requiring low thickness swelling. © Forest Research Institute Malaysia. Source


Ayrilmis N.,Istanbul University | Jarusombuti S.,Kasetsart University | Fueangvivat V.,Wood Research and Development Office | Bauchongkol P.,Wood Research and Development Office
Polymer Degradation and Stability | Year: 2011

This study aimed to enhance the dimensional stability of flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) containing fast growing wood fibres by a thermal-treatment method. The wood fibres were treated at three different temperatures (120, 150, or 180 °C) for 20 or 40 min in a laboratory autoclave. The WPC panels were made from dry-blended Eucalyptus camaldulensis wood fibres and polypropylene (PP) powder (50:50 by weight) using a conventional flat-press process under laboratory conditions. Thickness swelling and water absorption of the WPC panels significantly decreased with increasing the treatment temperature and time. The thermal-treatment of eucalyptus wood fibres slightly decreased the screw withdrawal resistance of the WPC panels as compared to the reference panels while the flexural properties and internal bond strength were more seriously affected by the treatment. The present study revealed that the thermal-treatment of the wood fibres significantly improved the dimensional stability of the WPC panels. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Jarusombuti S.,Kasetsart University | Ayrilmis N.,Istanbul University | Bauchongkol P.,Wood Research and Development Office | Fueangvivat V.,Wood Research and Development Office
BioResources | Year: 2010

The objectives of this research were to investigate surface characteristics and overlaying properties of medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels, as affected by thermal treatment of the fibers. MDF panels were manufactured from untreated rubberwood fibers and fibers treated at three different temperatures (120, 150, or 180°C) for 15 or 30 min. Contact angle measurements were obtained by using a goniometer connected with a digital camera and computer system. Roughness measurements, average roughness (Ra), mean peak-to-valley height (Rz), and maximum roughness (Ry), were taken from the sanded samples along and across the sandmarks using a fine stylus tracing technique. With the increasing thermal treatment temperature and time of the fibers, surface roughness of the panels decreased, while their wettability and adhesive bonding strength decreased. Statistical analyses showed significant differences in the surface roughness, contact angle, and adhesive bonding strength of the panels following thermal treatment. Based on the findings obtained from this study, the contact angle and surface roughness parameters of the MDF panels made from thermally treated rubberwood fibers can provide a good information on their ability to bond. Source


Jarusombuti S.,Kasetsart University | Ayrilmis N.,Istanbul University | Fueangvivat V.,Wood Research and Development Office | Bauchongkol P.,Wood Research and Development Office
High Temperature Materials and Processes | Year: 2011

This study investigated physical and mechanical properties of the light medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels made from thermally treated wood fibers of eucalyptus camaldulensis at three different temperatures (393 K, 423 K or 453 K) for 30 or 60 min in a laboratory autoclave. The average thickness swelling of the panels decreased by 16-54% depending on the treatment temperature and time. However, the modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and internal bond strength decreased by 16-37%, 9-25% and 10-39%, respectively. Based on the findings obtained from the present study, it may be said that wood fibers of E: camaldulensis treated at 453 K - 30 min can be used in the light MDF manufacture for use in humid conditions, such as kitchen and bathroom furniture requiring improved dimensional stability. Copyright © 2011 De Gruyter. Source

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