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Charanek A.M.,Womens Health Reference Center Hospital
Annals of Plastic Surgery | Year: 2014

The author presents a surgical procedure for chest-wall soft tissue reconstruction due to large losses based on a modified thoracoabdominal myocutaneous flap. Designed in a bilobed shape, it rests on the superior epigastric vessels and may include the cranial one fourth of the rectus abdominis muscle and the premuscular fascia of external oblique muscle and constitutes one of the largest flaps based on a single minor artery.Local recurrent breast tumors and adjuvant therapy associated to obesity, high blood pressure, type II diabetes, and tobacco abuse on previously debilitated patients render the usual reconstructive procedure difficulties. These become indications for this flap, whose safety is improved by maintaining the deep fascia of the external oblique muscle attached to the flap to preserve the network of the arteries close to the fascia and a wide-ranging interarterial choke anastomosis alongside the lateral projection of the flap on the thorax.Thus, a wide range of angles allows us to reach even the opposite site of the thorax over the sterna area with an easy closure of the donor site facilitated by the vertical portion of the abdominal donor site. The flap was used in 55 patients, and no serious complications, including necrosis, notable dehiscence, hematoma, seroma, or abdominal wall weakness, were observed. The overall aspect is acceptable with the visible scars over the upper part of the abdomen. © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


PubMed | Womens Health Reference Center Hospital
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Annals of plastic surgery | Year: 2014

The author presents a surgical procedure for chest-wall soft tissue reconstruction due to large losses based on a modified thoracoabdominal myocutaneous flap. Designed in a bilobed shape, it rests on the superior epigastric vessels and may include the cranial one fourth of the rectus abdominis muscle and the premuscular fascia of external oblique muscle and constitutes one of the largest flaps based on a single minor artery. Local recurrent breast tumors and adjuvant therapy associated to obesity, high blood pressure, type II diabetes, and tobacco abuse on previously debilitated patients render the usual reconstructive procedure difficulties. These become indications for this flap, whose safety is improved by maintaining the deep fascia of the external oblique muscle attached to the flap to preserve the network of the arteries close to the fascia and a wide-ranging interarterial choke anastomosis alongside the lateral projection of the flap on the thorax. Thus, a wide range of angles allows us to reach even the opposite site of the thorax over the sterna area with an easy closure of the donor site facilitated by the vertical portion of the abdominal donor site. The flap was used in 55 patients, and no serious complications, including necrosis, notable dehiscence, hematoma, seroma, or abdominal wall weakness, were observed. The overall aspect is acceptable with the visible scars over the upper part of the abdomen.

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