Time filter

Source Type

Waters J.M.,Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI | Lindo J.E.,Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI | Arkell R.M.,Australian National University | Cowin A.J.,Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI | Cowin A.J.,University of Adelaide
Journal of Investigative Dermatology | Year: 2011

Regeneration of cells, tissues, and organs has long captured the attention of researchers for its obvious potential benefits in biomedical applications. Although mammals are notoriously poor at regeneration compared with many lower-order species, the hair follicle, paradoxically a defining characteristic of mammals, is capable of regeneration following partial amputation. To investigate the role of a negative regulator of wound healing, flightless I (Flii), on hair follicle regeneration, the bulbar region of vibrissae from rats as well as strains of mice expressing low (Flii +/-), normal (Flii +/+), and high (FLII Tg/Tg) levels of Flii were surgically amputated, and then allowed to regenerate in vivo. Macroscopic and histological assessment of the regeneration process revealed impaired or delayed regenerative potential in Flii / follicles. Regenerated follicles expressing high levels of Flii (FLII Tg/Tg) produced significantly longer terminal hair fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to characterize the pattern of expression of Flii, as well as markers of hair follicle development and wound healing-associated factors during hair follicle regeneration. These studies confirmed that Flii appears to have a positive role in the regeneration of hair follicles, contrary to its negative influence on wound healing in skin. © 2011 The Society for Investigative Dermatology.


Waters J.M.,Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI | Cowin A.J.,Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI | Cowin A.J.,University of South Australia
Methods in Molecular Biology | Year: 2013

Regeneration of damaged or lost cells, tissues, and organs continues to fascinate and intrigue researchers with the lure of creating beneficial therapeutics for use in wound healing and regenerative medicine. However, unlike many other animals, wound healing in mammalian species typically proceeds via imperfect repair rather than authentic regeneration of tissues. Here, we describe a model of mammalian regeneration which can be used by researchers to investigate conditions that permit renewal of lost tissue and identify potential barriers to mammalian regeneration. The methods describe the surgical procedures for amputation of the lower third of the whisker follicle (vibrissa) in the mouse, as well as subsequent isolation and processing of the regenerating follicles for analysis. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


PubMed | Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI
Type: | Journal: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2013

Regeneration of damaged or lost cells, tissues, and organs continues to fascinate and intrigue researchers with the lure of creating beneficial therapeutics for use in wound healing and regenerative medicine. However, unlike many other animals, wound healing in mammalian species typically proceeds via imperfect repair rather than authentic regeneration of tissues. Here, we describe a model of mammalian regeneration which can be used by researchers to investigate conditions that permit renewal of lost tissue and identify potential barriers to mammalian regeneration. The methods describe the surgical procedures for amputation of the lower third of the whisker follicle (vibrissa) in the mouse, as well as subsequent isolation and processing of the regenerating follicles for analysis.


PubMed | Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of investigative dermatology | Year: 2011

Regeneration of cells, tissues, and organs has long captured the attention of researchers for its obvious potential benefits in biomedical applications. Although mammals are notoriously poor at regeneration compared with many lower-order species, the hair follicle, paradoxically a defining characteristic of mammals, is capable of regeneration following partial amputation. To investigate the role of a negative regulator of wound healing, flightless I (Flii), on hair follicle regeneration, the bulbar region of vibrissae from rats as well as strains of mice expressing low (Flii(+/-)), normal (Flii(+/+)), and high (FLII(Tg/Tg)) levels of Flii were surgically amputated, and then allowed to regenerate in vivo. Macroscopic and histological assessment of the regeneration process revealed impaired or delayed regenerative potential in Flii(+/-) follicles. Regenerated follicles expressing high levels of Flii (FLII(Tg/Tg)) produced significantly longer terminal hair fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to characterize the pattern of expression of Flii, as well as markers of hair follicle development and wound healing-associated factors during hair follicle regeneration. These studies confirmed that Flii appears to have a positive role in the regeneration of hair follicles, contrary to its negative influence on wound healing in skin.

Loading Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI collaborators
Loading Womens and Childrens Health Research Institute WCHRI collaborators