Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery

Mattawan, MI, United States

Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery

Mattawan, MI, United States
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Scribner K.,Michigan State University | Howell P.,Michigan State University | Thomas M.,Lake St Clair Fisheries Research Station | Smith K.,Plainwell Operations Service Center | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Great Lakes Research | Year: 2015

Achievement of management goals to maintain, enhance, or re-establish fish species of management importance in the Great Lakes often relies on hatchery supplementation. Issues may arise when individuals of hatchery origin are super-imposed upon natural stocks, particularly when resident species are naturally in low abundance such as with most Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) populations. We used 12 microsatellite loci to survey 450 individuals from 13 populations to quantify the contributions of stocked individuals to the current Muskellunge stock structure in Michigan and document evidence of inter-strain hybridization. Genetic differentiation among populations based on variance in allele frequency was moderately high (mean Fst=0.18), and was largely attributed to stocking history. The major genetic discordance was found among populations inhabiting waters with native Great Lakes and native and introduced Northern Muskellunge strains. We identified five genetic lineages, corresponding to native stocks (one Great Lake and two Northern strains) and two Northern Muskellunge strains obtained from other states and stocked across Michigan. Analyses revealed that the majority of populations sampled were composed of multiple hatchery strains of Northern Muskellunge, including waters connected to the Great Lakes and in waters with remnant native stocks. Admixtures of stocked strains and evidence of inter-strain hybridization were widespread. Collectively, data reveal that hatchery programs have the potential to restructure native fish populations on a statewide basis. Greater attention to current genetic stocks of both donor and recipient populations is advised to ensure that future supplementation efforts do not further erode the integrity of native stocks. © 2015 International Association for Great Lakes Research.


Scribner K.,Michigan State University | Howell P.,Michigan State University | Thomas M.,Lake St Clair Fisheries Research Station | Smith K.,Plainwell Operations Service Center | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Great Lakes Research | Year: 2015

Achievement of management goals to maintain, enhance, or re-establish fish species of management importance in the Great Lakes often relies on hatchery supplementation. Issues may arise when individuals of hatchery origin are super-imposed upon natural stocks, particularly when resident species are naturally in low abundance such as with most Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) populations. We used 12 microsatellite loci to survey 450 individuals from 13 populations to quantify the contributions of stocked individuals to the current Muskellunge stock structure in Michigan and document evidence of inter-strain hybridization. Genetic differentiation among populations based on variance in allele frequency was moderately high (mean Fst =0.18), and was largely attributed to stocking history. The major genetic discordance was found among populations inhabiting waters with native Great Lakes and native and introduced Northern Muskellunge strains. We identified five genetic lineages, corresponding to native stocks (one Great Lake and two Northern strains) and two Northern Muskellunge strains obtained from other states and stocked across Michigan. Analyses revealed that the majority of populations sampled were composed of multiple hatchery strains of Northern Muskellunge, including waters connected to the Great Lakes and in waters with remnant native stocks. Admixtures of stocked strains and evidence of inter-strain hybridization were widespread. Collectively, data reveal that hatchery programs have the potential to restructure native fish populations on a statewide basis. Greater attention to current genetic stocks of both donor and recipient populations is advised to ensure that future supplementation efforts do not further erode the integrity of native stocks. © 2015.


Faisal M.,Michigan State University | Schulz C.,Michigan State University | Eissa A.,Cairo University | Brenden T.,Michigan State University | And 5 more authors.
Preventive Veterinary Medicine | Year: 2012

Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) has caused mortalities and chronic infections in wild and farm-raised salmonids throughout the world. In the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America, BKD was associated with several large-scale mortality events of Oncorhynchus spp. throughout the 1980s and 1990s. In response to these mortality events, the state of Michigan implemented several enhanced biosecurity measures to limit the occurrence of BKD in state-operated hatcheries and gamete-collection weirs. The objectives of this study were to assess if infection levels (prevalence and intensity) of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of BKD, have changed in broodstock and pre-stocking fingerlings of three feral Oncorhynchus spp. (Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and steelhead (O. mykiss)) over a decade, following the implementation of the enhanced biosecurity measures. Between 2001 and 2010, a total of 3,530 broodstock salmonids collected from lakes Huron and Michigan tributaries during spawning runs and 4,294 propagated pre-stocking salmonid fingerlings collected from three state of Michigan fish hatcheries were tested for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigens using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Substantial declines in the overall prevalence of the bacterium were detected in each of the examined broodstocks. Most propagated pre-stocking fingerlings also exhibited substantial declines in R. salmoninarum prevalence. Prevalence was typically higher in Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan than from Lake Huron; prevalence was also generally higher in the Hinchenbrooke strain of coho salmon than in the Michigan-adapted strain. For most strains and stocks examined, intensity of R. salmoninarum infection was found to have declined. Although there were declines in the potential for shedding the bacteria for both male and female Chinook and coho salmon, overall shedding rates were generally low (<15%) except for Hinchenbrooke coho salmon strain, which had shedding prevalences in excess of 50% at the beginning of the study. This study provides evidence that enhanced biosecurity measures at culture facilities and collection sites are capable of severely curtailing disease infection in wild populations even at the scale of Lake Michigan fisheries. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Faisal M.,Michigan State University | Loch T.P.,Michigan State University | Fujimoto M.,Michigan State University | Woodiga S.A.,Michigan State University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Aquaculture Research and Development | Year: 2011

Salmonid species in the Laurentian Great Lakes basin suffer from early mortalities that are often associated with low survival rates of swim-up fry. Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) alevins exhibiting a spinning swimming behavior and convulsions were presented to the Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory of Michigan State University. Twelve yellow-pigmented bacterial isolates that were motile via gliding were recovered from the brains of dead and moribund fsh and identifed as Flavobacterium spp. (designated CS: 29-31, 34-38, 40-43). 16S rRNA sequence analysis indicated that 9 of the 12 sequences were grouped into a single clade (CS29, 31, 34-38, 40, 41) and were essentially identical over the 676 aligned bases used in the phylogenetic analysis. This clade is closely related to the eel-pathogenic Flavobacterium johnsoniae-like YO60 recovered from South Africa. The remaining three isolates, CS30, CS42, CS43 were closest to Flavobacterium sp. Wuba46 (100%), Flavobacterium sp. EP125 (100%), and Flavobacterium sp. WB 4.3-15 (99.9%), all of which were reported from European waters. Experimental challenge of fve month old coho salmon fry via intra-peritoneal injection with the CS36 isolate resulted in morbidity and mortality rates of approximately 10% in the two highest infection doses. Clinical signs included tachybranchia, hemorrhages, and fn erosion. Stained tissue sections from dead and moribund fsh showed degeneration of kidney tubules, edema in the renal interstitial tissues, heterophilic cellulitis and myodegenerative changes within the caudal peduncle, and a proteinaceous exudate in the coelomic cavity. Based on this study, favobacterial infections with these isolates, which were detected for the first time in North America, can potentially cause losses in yolk sac and swim-up coho salmon fry. © 2011 Faisal M, et al.

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