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Blasche G.W.,Medical University of Vienna | Arlinghaus A.,Wirtschafts und Organisationspsychologische Forschung GAWO eV | Dorner T.E.,Medical University of Vienna
Leisure Sciences | Year: 2014

The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between perceived leisure availability and fatigue in working individuals and the extent it mediates the known association between work hours and fatigue. A sample of 7,154 working individuals (ages 20-59) was drawn from the Austrian Health Survey 2006-07. The associations were determined using stepwise logistic regression analysis. Individuals perceiving few opportunities for leisure activities had a 2.7 greater likelihood of having prolonged fatigue (95% CI = 2.05-3.29) than those with sufficient leisure, after controlling for relevant confounders. Furthermore, the positive association between weekly hours of work and fatigue was mediated to a greater part by leisure opportunities, indicating that working long hours leads to fatigue by limiting leisure opportunities. The results of this study suggest that the perceived availability of leisure is a source of health and well-being in working individuals. © 2014 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Source


Lombardi D.A.,Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety | Lombardi D.A.,Harvard University | Jin K.,Fudan University | Courtney T.K.,Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety | And 8 more authors.
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health | Year: 2014

Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the duration and timing of rest breaks on traumatic injury risk across a shift in a relatively large sample of hospitalized workers with severe work-related hand injury in the People's Republic of China (PRC). Methods Hospitalized workers from multiple industries with severe work-related traumatic hand injury were recruited from 11 hospitals in three industrially-developed cities in the PRC: Ningbo, Liuzhou, and Wuxi. Cox regression was used to compare time into the work shift of injury across categories of rest breaks, while evaluating several potential covariates including age, gender, work hours, work start time and duration, injury day and time, duration and quality of last sleep, alertness/sleepiness, job control, and several transient work-related factors. Effect modification by work shift start time was also evaluated. Results With four days of injury, 703 hospitalized workers completed a face-to-face interview. After adjust- ing for significant covariates, workers with rest breaks of 1-30, 31-60, and >60 minutes were able to work significantly (P<0.001) longer into their work shift without an injury (>5 hours) than those with no rest break. A significant interaction was also observed between rest break status and start time of the work shift. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that rest breaks of any duration have a significant effect on delaying the onset of a work-related injury, which is modified by the time of day in which a shift begins. Source


Arlinghaus A.,Wirtschafts und Organisationspsychologische Forschung GAWO eV | Nachreiner F.,Wirtschafts und Organisationspsychologische Forschung GAWO eV
Chronobiology International | Year: 2013

Boundaries between work and private life are diminishing, but little is known on how this influences worker health. Therefore, we examined the association between work-related contacts outside of regular working hours by e-mail or phone and self-reported health in a representative sample of European employees (n = 23 760). The risk of reporting 1 health problem(s) was increased in workers contacted sometimes (odds ratio [OR]: 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.27) or often (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.12-1.34) as compared with never, controlling for several demographic and workplace characteristics. Further research is needed to quantify work and nonwork patterns and their health effects. © Informa Healthcare USA, Inc. Source


Lombardi D.A.,Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety | Lombardi D.A.,Harvard University | Jin K.,Fudan University | Vetter C.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 10 more authors.
Chronobiology International | Year: 2014

Early shift start time and night shifts are associated with reduced sleep duration and poor sleep quality that often lead to increased fatigue levels, performance decrements and adverse safety and health outcomes. This study investigates the impact of shift starting time on sleep patterns, including the duration and quality of sleep and alertness/sleepiness at the time of injury, in a large epidemiological field study of hospitalized adults with severe work-related hand injury in the People's Republic of China (PRC) from multiple industries with severe work-related traumatic hand injury were recruited from 11 hospitals in three industrially-developed cities in the PRC: Ningbo, Liuzhou and Wuxi. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare sleep duration, sleep quality and alertness/sleepiness across 3 h increments of shift start time, while adjusting for age, gender, work hours, shift duration, day of injury and several transient work-related factors. Effect modification by gender was also evaluated. Seven-hundred and three hospitalized adults (96.4%) completed a face-to-face interview within 4 days of injury; 527 (75.0%) were male, with a mean (±SEM) age of 31.8 ± 0.4 years. Overall, these adults worked relatively long weekly (55.7 ± 0.6 h) and daily hours (8.6 ± 0.07 h). Average sleep duration prior to injury was 8.5 h (±0.07), and showed significant variations (p value <0.05) across shift starting time increments. Overall mean prior sleep duration was shortest for individuals starting shifts from "21:00-23:59" (5.6±0.8 h) followed by midnight "00:00-02:59" (6.1 ± 0.6 h). However, a statistically significant interaction (p < 0.05) was observed between gender and shift starting time on mean sleep duration. For males the shortest sleep duration was 5.6 h ("21:00-23:59") and for females the shortest was 4.3 h ("24:00-02:59" and "15:00-17:59"). Sleep quality (generally quite well) and alertness/sleepiness based on the KSS (generally alert) did not vary significantly across shift starting time. Results suggest that sleep duration is shortest among injured PRC adults starting shifts late night and early morning. However, with more than 8.5 h of sleep on average work days, Chinese slept much longer than typical US day workers (Sleep in America Poll, 2012, 6:44 on workdays, 7:35 on free days), and this may help to explain higher than expected alertness/sleepiness scores at the time of injury. © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc. Source

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