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Ramdenee D.,Institute Technologique Of La Maintenance Industrielle | Paradis P.L.,T3e | Ibrahim H.,TechnoCenter eolien | Joyram H.,Sir Abdool Raman Osman | Ilinca A.,Wind Energy Research Laboratory
International Conference on Integrated Modeling and Analysis in Applied Control and Automation | Year: 2013

A structure's wind resistance largely determines its Extended Coverage Endorsement (ECE) and is an important factor in determining total insurance costs. Insurance policies and costs are often not very representative or prejudicial to either the insurer or the policy holder due to uncertainties in the ability to predict structures' wins resistance capacities. In other words, according to International Standards (ISO 2394:1998(E)) all structures including tall buildings must abide to the criteria of serviceability. Serviceability means the ability of a structure or structural element to perform adequately under normal use, expected actions or bounded actions (actions which have a limited value which cannot be exceeded and which is exactly or approximately known). Consequently, the ISO rules stipulate that choice of structural system, design for durability and implementation of quality policy need to be accordingly set up as to appropriate degree of reliability, which, in turn should be judged with due regard to the possible consequences of failure. In the case of tall buildings, mostly as to what concerns claddings, it is becoming more and more important to define proper reliability framework to increasecertainty and render insurance policies more tailor made and unbiased. When it comes to static or quasi-permanent value solicitations on buildings such as known winds, collisions, etc, a high level of certainty exists in the calculations and models predicting failure and damage. However, when it comes to loads with high variability, the reliability index becomes very low. In many countries, skyscrapers are rapidly growing in restrained areas such that the formed corridors accelerate the winds and increase formation of vortices. Furthermore, in cases of rapidly changing gusts, the wind loads can be quite dangerous and cause damage and even failure to the buildings. Unfortunately, limited work enables very precise prediction of such loads such that insurance policies are accordingly unspecific. In this paper, work conducted at the Wind Energy Research Laboratory (WERL) to model pressure and velocity fields around buildings in a test area is presented. In most studies, proposed results are only for one building only and the wind regime do not account for the topography around. This present article, wishes to propose a full scale 3D simulation of the pressure, turbulence and velocity regimes around multiple buildings in thesame city whilst accounting for topography and canopy information of the region. Further to being a tool to uncertainty prediction in wind modeling, this highly complex CFD (computational Fluid dynamics) model proposes vortex modeling in high gradient regions. These are, moreover, compared and calibrated using a Matlab model. Source


Ramdenee D.,Institute Technologique Of La Maintenance Industrielle | Luc Paradis P.,T3e | Ibrahim H.,TechnoCenter eolien | Ilinca A.,Wind Energy Research Laboratory
7th Int. Conference on Integrated Modeling and Analysis in Applied Control and Automation, IMAACA 2013, Held at the International Multidisciplinary Modeling and Simulation Multiconference, I3M 2013 | Year: 2013

A structure's wind resistance largely determines its Extended Coverage Endorsement (ECE) and is an important factor in determining total insurance costs. Insurance policies and costs are often not very representative or prejudicial to either the insurer or the policy holder due to uncertainties in the ability to predict structures' wins resistance capacities. In other words, according to International Standards (ISO 2394:1998(E)) all structures including tall buildings must abide to the criteria of serviceability. Serviceability means the ability of a structure or structural element to perform adequately under normal use, expected actions or bounded actions (actions which have a limited value which cannot be exceeded and which is exactly or approximately known). Consequently, the ISO rules stipulate that choice of structural system, design for durability and implementation of quality policy need to be accordingly set up as to appropriate degree of reliability, which, in turn should be judged with due regard to the possible consequences of failure. In the case of tall buildings, mostly as to what concerns claddings, it is becoming more and more important to define proper reliability framework to increase certainty and render insurance policies more tailor made and unbiased. When it comes to static or quasi-permanent value solicitations on buildings such as known winds, collisions, etc, a high level of certainty exists in the calculations and models predicting failure and damage. However, when it comes to loads with high variability, the reliability index becomes very low. In many countries, skyscrapers are rapidly growing in restrained areas such that the formed corridors accelerate the winds and increase formation of vortices. Furthermore, in cases of rapidly changing gusts, the wind loads can be quite dangerous and cause damage and even failure to the buildings. Unfortunately, limited work enables very precise prediction of such loads such that insurance policies are accordingly unspecific. In this paper, work conducted at the Wind Energy Research Laboratory (WERL) to model pressure and velocity fields around buildings in a test area is presented. In most studies, proposed results are only for one building only and the wind regime do not account for the topography around. This present article, wishes to propose a full scale 3D simulation of the pressure, turbulence and velocity regimes around multiple buildings in the same city whilst accounting for topography and canopy information of the region. Further to being a tool to uncertainty prediction in wind modeling, this highly complex CFD (computational Fluid dynamics) model proposes vortex modeling in high gradient regions. These are, moreover, compared and calibrated using a Matlab model. Source


Feurtey E.,University of Quebec at Rimouski | Feurtey E.,Wind Energy Research Laboratory | Ilinca A.,University of Quebec at Rimouski | Ilinca A.,Wind Energy Research Laboratory | And 3 more authors.
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2015

This article shows that the unfavorable context of emergence, as well as neo-corporatism, limited the weight of wind energy in France and Quebec and delayed the project development and the wind industry as a whole. Indeed, the level of political will to wind energy development in both jurisdictions is fluctuating and characterized by a lack of continuity in policy or regulatory instruments. The efficiency of the pricing mechanisms depends on its political design. While the French Feed-In Tariff is inefficient in terms of installed capacity and is deemed too expensive by opponents, the first two calls for tenders in Quebec fare quite well on that front. However, they are perceived as unacceptable due to the multinational companies involved and the implantation of large-scale wind farms in inhabited areas. The third community call for tender, while generally better-accepted locally, is poorly regarded among the cooperative movement and at the national level because of the competition with the municipal sector and higher costs to society. In both cases, a hybrid pricing model would achieve a better balance between costs to society and local development, thus promoting social acceptance through a greater diversity in ownership types and wind farms size. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. Source


Feurtey E.,University of Quebec at Rimouski | Feurtey E.,Wind Energy Research Laboratory | Ilinca A.,University of Quebec at Rimouski | Ilinca A.,Wind Energy Research Laboratory | And 3 more authors.
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2016

This article studies the different institutional factors that influence a strategic wind energy decision-making process through a comparative transnational study of Quebec (Canada) and France. Research confirms that political choices are dynamic and vary with a change in the wind energy context, the balance of power between pressure groups, supranational influences, energy evaluation approaches and social acceptance. Until the 90s, an initially unfavorable national energy context, combined with a neocorporatist culture, as defined by Szarka (2004) [1], limited the place of wind energy in both jurisdictions. In the 2000s, a political window opened when the private sector penetrated the market with the deregulation of the electricity sector, exogenous pressure from the European Union in France, endogenous pressure from social actions in Quebec, and a more favorable energy context in both cases. However, this political window was short-lived due to social acceptance issues. In Quebec, political will was stronger until 2013. Now, the social controversy surrounding wind energy has shifted from the local to the national level. Projects are better accepted locally because of local financial involvement, but an anticipated electricity surplus questions the relevance of new energy projects. In France, political support depends on the government in power. Between 2005 and 2013, the reduction in annual wind power installations from 1246 MW to 621 MW was due to the major influence of the anti-wind lobby on a right-wing government. After 2013, the left-wing governments arrival coincided with a phasing out of several regulatory and financial uncertainties. Today, both jurisdictions are at a crossroads and the future energy mix will depend on the relative influence of the institutional components identified. In our opinion, key solutions to more sustainable political choices are conditioned by an improvement in the way projects and policies, plans and programs are assessed. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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