Chambersburg, PA, United States
Chambersburg, PA, United States

Wilson College, founded 1869, is a private, Presbyterian-related, liberal arts college located on a 300-acre campus in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, United States. It was founded by two Presbyterian ministers, but named for its first major donor, Sarah Wilson of nearby St. Thomas Township, Pennsylvania. For 144 years, Wilson has been a women's college. In 2013 the college's board of trustees voted to make the college coeducational beginning in the 2013-2014 academic year. Wilson College has about 700 students from 21 U.S. states and nine foreign countries. It's known for its Women with Children program, which allows single mothers to bring their children to live with them on campus, as well as for its veterinary medical technician and equestrian programs, and the Fulton Center for Sustainable Living, which operates a 7-acre organic farm and a CSA program that supplies community families and others with fresh, organic produce. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Think about the workplace 10 years ago: The first iPhone wouldn’t be released until July 2007. There probably wasn’t “an app for that.” Open floor plans hadn’t yet become a privacy-busting phenomenon. And people weren’t obsessed with “the cloud.” Certainly, smart devices, cloud-based platforms, and the way we work have been transformed over the past decade. We’re changing jobs more often—now, more often because we want to. And the breakneck speed of technology is once again transforming the way we will work. But it’s hard to know exactly what the workplace will look like in 10 years, says Barbara Mistick, president of Wilson College and coauthor of Stretch: How to Future-Proof Yourself for Tomorrow’s Workplace. So keeping yourself marketable and relevant for a long career is a constant process of evaluation, education, and adaptation, she says. Here’s what you need to do to keep yourself prepared for—and even ahead of—what comes next. The first thing you need to do is evaluate the best sources of information about your industry or career path, Mistick says. What conferences, organizations, websites, publications, or other resources have the best and most insightful information and resources? Connect with those resources so that you’re staying apprised of the information they have to offer. Beyond that, you should also be watching innovation in other industries, says strategist and adviser Elizabeth Crook, author of the new book Live Large:  The Achiever’s Guide to What’s Next. Technology and process innovation aren’t typically limited to one sector. For example, if you’re in marketing, keep an eye on what’s happening in finance. Could the machine learning and automated approaches to checking out customers’ financial health give you clues about better targeting your market? When you explore different areas, you never know what you’ll find that’s relevant, she says. Crook says she recently read a book about quantum physics that reminded her there’s more than one way to do things. That seems like a basic concept, she says, but it helped her not get mired in stale thinking. You probably go for a medical checkup every year or two. You get your car serviced regularly. But are you scheduling time to ensure that your own skills and education are up to date? If not, that’s a mistake, Mistick says. Her strategic plans for customers are typically focused on two to three years because 10 years is too far out to accurately predict. Similarly, professionals need to “reevaluate every couple of years to make sure that whatever skills you’re working on, they’re still the skills you think you should be working on,” she says. Once you get to a certain point in your career, it’s easy to get complacent or think you know it all. That’s deadly. In order to stay relevant and marketable, you need to keep finding ways to stretch your skills, Mistick says. “Your company or organization is not going to provide the level of professional assistance or development that you need in order to keep your career relevant. I’d say the No. 1 thing you have to do is realize that the responsibility for your professional development is on you,” she says.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best online colleges and universities in Pennsylvania for 2017. The top 50 four-year schools were named, with Temple University, Pennsylvania State University, Carnegie Mellon University, Drexel University and University of Pittsburgh honored as the top five. 12 two-year colleges were also recognized, with Harrisburg Area Community College, Community College of Allegheny County, Westmoreland County Community College, Lehigh Carbon Community College and Bucks County Community College taking the top five spots. “These Pennsylvania colleges and universities have proven their value when it comes to providing high-quality online certificate and degree programs,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “In addition to strong academics, these schools also offer their online students exceptional counseling and support resources that foster success.” To earn a spot on the Community for Accredited Online Schools list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Several additional data points are taken into consideration when scoring each school, including financial aid offerings, student/teacher ratios, graduation rates, student services and academic resources. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Pennsylvania for 2017 include the following: Alvernia University Arcadia University California University of Pennsylvania Carlow University Carnegie Mellon University Cedar Crest College Chatham University Clarks Summit University Delaware Valley University DeSales University Drexel University Duquesne University Eastern University Gannon University Geneva College Gwynedd Mercy University Immaculata University Indiana University of Pennsylvania-Main Campus Keystone College King's College La Roche College La Salle University Lancaster Bible College Lehigh University Marywood University Mercyhurst University Messiah College Misericordia University Mount Aloysius College Neumann University Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus Pennsylvania State University-Penn State Harrisburg Pennsylvania State University-Penn State Shenango Philadelphia University Point Park University Robert Morris University Rosemont College Saint Francis University Saint Joseph's University Seton Hill University Temple University University of Pittsburgh-Pittsburgh Campus University of Scranton University of the Sciences University of Valley Forge Villanova University West Chester University of Pennsylvania Widener University-Main Campus Wilkes University Wilson College Best Online Two-Year Schools in Pennsylvania for 2017 include the following: Bucks County Community College Community College of Allegheny County Community College of Philadelphia Harcum College Harrisburg Area Community College - Harrisburg Lehigh Carbon Community College Luzerne County Community College Montgomery County Community College Northampton County Area Community College Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Reading Area Community College Westmoreland County Community College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


Krakauer T.,Integrated Toxicology Division | Stiles B.G.,Wilson College
Virulence | Year: 2013

Staphylococcus aureus plays an important role in numerous human cases of food poisoning, soft tissue, and bone infections, as well as potentially lethal toxic shock. This common bacterium synthesizes various virulence factors that include staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). These protein toxins bind directly to major histocompatibility complex class II on antigen-presenting cells and specific Vβ regions of T-cell receptors, resulting in potentially life-threatening stimulation of the immune system. Picomolar concentrations of SEs ultimately elicit proinflammatory cytokines that can induce fever, hypotension, multi-organ failure, and lethal shock. Various in vitro and in vivo models have provided important tools for studying the biological effects of, as well as potential vaccines/therapeutics against, the SEs. This review succinctly presents known physical and biological properties of the SEs, including various intervention strategies. In particular, SEB will often be portrayed as per biodefense concerns dating back to the 1960s.


Aruna K.,Wilson College | Mobashshera T.,Wilson College
EXCLI Journal | Year: 2012

β-lactams are the most widely used group of antimicrobials. However, increasing resistance to these valuable drugs in uropathogens, mediated principally by β-lactamases, has become a major concern. The present study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL) producers in clinical isolates of urine specimens, collected from various healthcare centres across south Mumbai. A total of 195 gram negative urine isolates were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13), Proteus mirabilis (21), Klebsiella pneumoniae (29), Escherichia coli (96), Enterobacter aerogenes (1), Enterobacter cloacae (1), Enterococcus fecalis (1), Morganella morganii (1), Citrobacter diversus (16), Citrobacter amalonaticus (5) and Proteus vulgaris (11). Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (AST) by Kirby-Bauer method showed 43.07 % (84/195) of the isolates were resistant to more than 70 % of the antibiotics used. Confirmatory screening using a combination of Double Disk Synergy Test (DDST), Phenotypic Confirmatory Disc Diffusion Test (PCDDT) and E-test revealed the overall prevalence of ESBL producers to be 34.71 % (68/195). The study showed 72.05 % of the ESBL producers to be resistant to fluoroquinolones, highlighting its extensive use in the region of south Mumbai. All ESBL producers were found to be sensitive to Imipenem whereas 82.36 % showed susceptibility to Amikacin making these 2 antibiotics the most effective choice of drug against ESBLs. In order to ensure rational treatment of highly resistant pathogens, the occurrence of ESBL and its primary studies may serve as a base for further research and findings.


Massey D.,St Johns College | Kulshrestha A.,St Johns College | Masih J.,St Johns College | Masih J.,Wilson College | And 2 more authors.
Building and Environment | Year: 2012

This study presents data on the size characterization concentration of PM10, PM5.0, PM2.5 and PM1.0. These particulate concentrations were monitored from October-07 to March-09 indoors and outdoors of five roadside and five urban homes using Grimm aerosol spectrometer in Agra, India. Annual average concentrations of coarse particles (PM10) indoor and outdoor were 247μgm-3 and 255μgm-3 at roadside houses and 181μgm-3 and 195μgm-3 at urban houses. PM5.0 concentrations at roadside houses were 211μgm-3 and 230μgm-3 and at urban houses were 145μgm-3 and 159μgm-3. For fine particles (PM2.5) the annual mean concentrations were 161μgm-3 and 160μgm-3 at roadside houses and 109μgm-3 and 123μgm-3 at urban houses. PM1.0 concentrations at roadside houses were 111μgm-3 and 112μgm-3 while at urban houses they were 99μgm-3 and 104μgm-3. Monthly and seasonal variations of coarse and fine particulate matter have been studied at both the monitoring sites. Significant seasonal variations of particulate pollutants were obtained using the daily average particulate concentrations along with the inter particulate ratios. Particulate indoor/outdoor ratios and concentrations were also linked with meteorological conditions and indoor activities using occupant's diary entries. The concentration of all sizes of particulate matter was found to be highest in winter season due to increase human activities and more space heating in indoors and due to low windspeed and high humidity in outdoors in comparison with other seasons. There was a strong correlation between indoor and outdoor particulate at both the sites. Health problems in occupants of the houses with higher concentrations of the fine particulate matter were more prominent. Household activities like cooking on stoves, indoor smoking and outdoor vehicular traffic, and garbage burning were found to be the major sources of particulate emissions indoor as well as outdoors. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Weinstein S.A.,Womens and Childrens Hospital | Stiles B.G.,U.S. Army | Stiles B.G.,Wilson College
Sexual Health | Year: 2011

Mycoplasma genitalium is attracting increasing recognition as an important sexually transmitted pathogen. Presented is a review of the epidemiology, detection, presentation and management of M. genitalium infection. Accumulating evidence suggests that M. genitalium is an important cause of non-gonococcal, non-chlamydial urethritis and cervicitis, and is linked with pelvic inflammatory disease and, possibly, obstetric complications. Although there is no standard detection assay, several nucleic acid amplification tests have >95% sensitivity and specificity for M. genitalium. To date, there is a general lack of established protocols for screening in public health clinics. Patients with urethritis or cervicitis should be screened for M. genitalium and some asymptomatic sub-groups should be screened depending on individual factors and local prevalence. Investigations estimating M. genitalium geographic prevalence document generally low incidence, but some communities exhibit infection frequencies comparable to that of Chlamydia trachomatis. Accumulating evidence supports an extended regimen of azithromycin for treatment of M. genitalium infection, as data suggest that stat 1g azithromycin may be less effective. Although data are limited, azithromycin-resistant cases documented to date respond to an appropriate fluoroquinolone (e.g. moxifloxacin). Inconsistent clinical recognition of M. genitalium may result in treatment failure and subsequent persistence due to ineffective antibiotics. The contrasting nature of existing literature regarding risks of M. genitalium infection emphasises the need for further carefully controlled studies of this emerging pathogen. © 2011 CSIRO.


Majer J.M.,Wilson College | Komer A.C.,DePaul University | Jason L.A.,DePaul University
Journal of Dual Diagnosis | Year: 2015

Objective: The relationship between mental illness and human-immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-risk sexual behavior among persons with substance use disorders is not well-established because of differences in assessing psychiatric factors (types, symptoms, severity), substance use (diagnosis, survey responses, past substance use), and HIV-risk sexual behaviors (individual measures, combination of sex/drug use risk behaviors) across studies. This study utilized a more global and dimensional aspect of psychiatric issues (problem severity) to examine the relationship with HIV-risk sexual behaviors and substance use among persons with substance use disorders. Methods: Participants included 224 men and 46 women, with a mean age of 40.4 years (SD = 9.5). The most common substances were heroin/opiates, with 41.4% reporting use of these substances (n = 110), while 27.8% reported using cocaine (n = 74) and 12.8% reported using alcohol (n = 34). Of all participants, 39 (14.4%) were identified as having high psychiatric severity (defined using the psychiatric severity score from the Addiction Severity Index), which was used as an indication of probable comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders. Among these participants likely to have comorbid disorders, hierarchical linear regression was conducted to examine HIV-risk sexual behaviors (number of partners and unprotected sexual behaviors in the past 30 days) in relation to psychiatric severity, substance use, and gender. Results: Gender (women) and psychiatric severity (higher) were significantly related to greater HIV-risk sexual behaviors. After entering gender and substance use into the regression model, psychiatric severity accounted for another 21.9% of the variance in number of partners and 14.1% of the variance in unprotected sexual behaviors. Overall, the models accounted for 55.5% and 15.6% of the variance, respectively. A significant interaction was found for number of partners (but not frequency of unprotected behavior), such that those higher in psychiatric severity and higher in substance use had a greater number of sexual partners. The model including this interaction term accounted for 63.4% of the variance in number of partners. Conclusions: Findings suggest psychiatric severity is an underlying risk factor for HIV-risk sexual behavior among persons with substance use disorders who have various psychiatric comorbidities. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Krakauer T.,U.S. Army | Stiles B.G.,Wilson College
Virulence | Year: 2013

Staphylococcus aureus plays an important role in numerous human cases of food poisoning, soft tissue and bone infections, as well as potentially lethal toxic shock. This common bacterium synthesizes various virulence factors that include staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). These protein toxins bind directly to major histocompatibility complex class II on antigen-presenting cells and specific Vβ regions of T-cell receptors, resulting in potentially life-threatening stimulation of the immune system. Picomolar concentrations of SEs ultimately elicit proinflammatory cytokines that can induce fever, hypotension, multi-organ failure, and lethal shock. Various in vitro and in vivo models have provided important tools for studying the biological effects of, as well as potential vaccines/therapeutics against, the SEs. This review succinctly presents known physical and biological properties of the SEs, including various intervention strategies. In particular, SEB will often be portrayed as per biodefense concerns dating back to the 1960s. © 2013 Landes Bioscience.


Stiles B.G.,Wilson College | Barth G.,Wilson College | Barth H.,University of Ulm | Popoff M.R.,Institute Pasteur Paris
Toxins | Year: 2013

Clostridium perfringens is a prolific, toxin-producing anaerobe causing multiple diseases in humans and animals. One of these toxins is epsilon, a 33 kDa protein produced by Clostridium perfringens (types B and D) that induces fatal enteric disease of goats, sheep and cattle. Epsilon toxin (Etx) belongs to the aerolysin-like toxin family. It contains three distinct domains, is proteolytically-activated and forms oligomeric pores on cell surfaces via a lipid raft-associated protein(s). Vaccination controls Etx-induced disease in the field. However, therapeutic measures are currently lacking. This review initially introduces C. perfringens toxins, subsequently focusing upon the Etx and its biochemistry, disease characteristics in various animals that include laboratory models (in vitro and in vivo), and finally control mechanisms (vaccines and therapeutics). © 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

After the success of previous Pokemon maps, the Franklin County Visitors Bureau is releasing four new Pokemon maps to cover more of the sights of Franklin County. These new maps include one that covers three of the local colleges, Penn State University Mont Alto, Wilson College and Shippensburg University. The second map includes two of Franklin County’s special green spaces; Norlo Park and Caledonia State Park. The third includes downtown Mercersburg, Fort Loudoun and St Thomas and the last, downtown Greencastle. These exclusive maps highlight stops in the downtown area and take visitors on a journey across beautiful Franklin County. More information and destinations in those areas are also available for those wishing to extend their visit. Trainers are welcome to come into the Visitors Bureau at 37 South Main Street, Suite 100, to get their own copy of the map during office hours 8am-4:30pm Monday through Friday or the map can be downloaded online at https://issuu.com/fcvb/docs/college_pokemap, https://issuu.com/fcvb/docs/mercersburg_fort_loudoun_st_thomas_, https://issuu.com/fcvb/docs/norlo_park_and_caledonia_map and https://issuu.com/fcvb/docs/greencastle_map. Previous Pokemon Maps that the Visitors Bureau has created include Downtown Chambersburg and Waynesboro. The Franklin County Visitors Bureau invites all to explore Franklin County PA and enjoy the trails of history, arts, and architecture, recreation, natural beauty, fresh foods and the warm hospitality of communities like Chambersburg, Greencastle, Mercersburg, Shippensburg, and Waynesboro. Franklin County PA is located just north of the Mason Dixon Line and is an easy drive to Washington DC, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. Discover more…plan a visit soon at ExploreFranklinCountyPA.com or by contacting 866.646.8060.

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