Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Santa Barbara, CA, United States

Westmont College, founded in 1937, is an interdenominational Christian liberal arts college in Santa Barbara, California. Wikipedia.


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Tro N.J.,Westmont College
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2012

This letter is a response to Alexander Grushow's article, "Is It Time To Retire the Hybrid Atomic Orbital?" This letter suggests reasons for why valence bond theory and the associated hybrid atomic orbitals should continue to be taught in the chemistry curriculum. © 2012 American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc.


Brocker E.R.,University of California at Santa Barbara | Anderson S.E.,University of California at Santa Barbara | Anderson S.E.,Westmont College | Northrop B.H.,Wesleyan University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the American Chemical Society | Year: 2010

Rigid rectangular, triangular, and prismatic supramolecular assemblies, cyclobis[(2,9-bis[trans-Pt(PEt3)2(PF6)] anthracene)(4,4′-dipyridyl)], cyclotris[(2,9-bis[trans-Pt(PEt 3)2(PF6)]phenanthrene)(4,4′-dipyridyl)], and cyclotris[bis[cis-Pt(PEt3)2(CF3SO 3)2]tetrakis(4-pyridyl) cyclobutadienecyclopentadienylcobalt(I)], respectively, based on dipyridyl ligands and square planar platinum coordination, have been investigated by ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). Electrospray ionization-quadrupole and time-of-flight spectra have been obtained and fragmentation pathways assigned. Ion mobility studies give cross sections that compare very well with cross sections of the supramolecular rectangle and triangle species on the basis of X-ray bond distances. For the larger prism structures, agreement of experimental and calculated cross sections from molecular modeling is very good, indicating IMS-MS methods can be used to characterize complex self-assembled structures where X-ray or other spectroscopic structures are not available. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE & REACTIONS | Award Amount: 129.02K | Year: 2015

The main goal of this program is to advance the understanding of the fundamental nature of atomic nuclei, with undergraduate student participation as an integral component. The principle investigator and team of undergraduate students will investigate the structure of light neutron-rich atomic nuclei that do not exist naturally in nature but must be produced at an accelerator facility. Understanding these nuclei is important for advancing our understanding of how the protons and the neutrons bind together in nuclear systems that are very near the limits of existence. As the research program advances to the study of heavier nuclei, results will provide important information for the understanding of explosive astrophysical environments such as supernovae and neutron star mergers. Much of the research will be conducted at Westmont College, which includes student training in and the use of instrumentation and data analysis techniques, and at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, where students participate in state-of-the-art nuclear physics experiments. Major instrumentation used in experiments include the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA), both constructed and tested by undergraduate students from several institutions in the MoNA collaboration. In addition to the science goals, an important goal of this program is to provide transformational research experiences for the participating undergraduate students that can have a positive influence on decisions they make for future study and careers in physics.

The research supported by this award addresses directly some of the main questions driving the field of nuclear science today. Properties of ground and excited states of neutron-rich nuclei will be investigated using the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA), the Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA), and the Sweeper Magnet and its associated suite of charged particle detectors, all located at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. Goals of the program include a conclusive measurement of the 10He ground state resonance energy, precise measurement of the 26O ground state lifetime, analysis of the 2-neutron cascade decay of excited states of 24O, and a systematic study of neutron scattering in the MoNA detector bars at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research program will help advance knowledge of nuclear structure far from stability, including better understanding of neutron-rich nuclei near the dripline, neutron halo systems, and exotic forms of nuclear decay including multiple neutron decays and 2-neutron radioactivity.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 25.00K | Year: 2014

This award will provide funds to partially support the 17th annual Conference Experience for Undergraduates (CEU), which is held as part of the Fall Meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics. This years meeting will be held October 7 - 11, 2014, in Waikloloa, Hawaii and will be held jointly with the Japanese Physical Society. The CEU is a natural venue for students who have had an undergraduate research experience to present the results of their work and interact with other students as well as faculty and senior researchers. The CEU has been immensely successful in fostering this interaction, which helps students to have a broad introduction and exposure to research across nuclear physics, and to enable senior researchers to get to know some of the junior future leaders. Partial support will be provided for approximately 20 undergraduate students, out of a planned total of 125.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 190.76K | Year: 2011

This experimental nuclear physics research program is focused primarily on determining the properties of neutron-rich exotic nuclei at or just beyond the neutron dripline. In the lightest mass region (Z < 9) relatively little is known about the properties of unbound nuclear ground and excited states. Experiments designed to determine these properties are carried out using the Coupled Cyclotron Facility (CCF) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, along with the coupled MoNA-LISA arrays (Modular Neutron Array and the Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array) in conjunction with the Sweeper Magnet. A central component of this research program is undergraduate student participation in every aspect of the research. Students participate in the experimental runs, including in preparation beforehand and in the analysis afterward.
Results from the this research program will advance knowledge of nuclear structure far from stability. Opportunities for undergraduates to participate in this cutting-edge research, and to interact with the larger nuclear physics community, provide the kind of experiences that help recruit future generations of nuclear scientists.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 39.23K | Year: 2013

Russell Howell (PI, Westmont College), Alan Noell (Oklahoma State University), and Paul Zorn (St. Olaf College) are organizing a one-week workshop (June 24 to 28, 2013, at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA). The workshop is producing a document that contains recommendations for revitalizing the content and teaching of a first course in complex analysis at the undergraduate level. The animating momentum behind the project is modeled after the successful reform movements in calculus and linear algebra. A follow-up contributed paper session and panel discussion is being planned for the 2014 Joint Mathematics Meetings in Baltimore, MD.

The fifteen workshop participants are researchers and educators trained in complex analysis, people with expertise in pedagogy, and people affiliated with scientific or industrial organizations who use complex analysis on a regular basis. One of the focal points of the workshop is looking at ways of enhancing and expanding applications of complex analysis that are usually presented to undergraduates. Other goals being pursued include crafting recommendations for technology and pedagogy, with special emphasis on identifying promising (or, better yet, tested) inquiry-based learning approaches to the subject of complex analysis at the undergraduate level.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 25.00K | Year: 2013

This award provides funds for conference support for approximately 43 undergraduate students (out of a total of 133) attending the fall meeting of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society, in Newport Beach, CA (October 24-27, 2012). It is the 15th annual Conference Experience for Undergraduates (CEU). The CEU is a natural venue for students who have had an undergraduate research experience to present the results of their work and interact with other students as well as faculty and senior researchers. CEU has been immensely successful in fostering this interaction, which helps students to have a broad introduction and exposure to research across nuclear physics, and to enable senior researchers to get to know some of the junior future leaders.


This award will provide funds for conference support for approximately 39 undergraduate students (out of a total of 125) attending the fall meeting of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society, in Newport News, VA (October 23-26, 2013). It is the 16th annual Conference Experience for Undergraduates (CEU). The CEU is a natural venue for students who have had an undergraduate research experience to present the results of their work and interact with other students as well as faculty and senior researchers. CEU has been immensely successful in fostering this interaction, which helps students to have a broad introduction and exposure to research across nuclear physics, and to enable senior researchers to get to know some of the junior future leaders.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE & REACTIONS | Award Amount: 25.00K | Year: 2015

This award will provide funds to partially support the 18th annual Conference Experience for Undergraduates (CEU), which is held as part of the Fall Meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics. This years meeting will be held October 28 - 31, 2015, in Santa Fe, NM. The CEU is a natural venue for students who have had an undergraduate research experience to present the results of their work and interact with other students as well as faculty and senior researchers. The CEU has been immensely successful in fostering this interaction, which helps students to have a broad introduction and exposure to research across nuclear physics, and to enable senior researchers to get to know some of the junior future leaders. Partial support will be provided for approximately 32 undergraduate students, out of a planned total of 150.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 25.00K | Year: 2012

This award provides funds for conference support for approximately 29 undergraduate students (out of a total of 135) attending the fall meeting of the Divisions of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society, in East Lansing, MI (October 26-29, 2011). It is the 14th annual Conference Experience for Undergraduates (CEU). The CEU is a natural venue for students who have had an undergraduate research experience to present the results of their work and interact with other students as well as faculty and senior researchers. CEU has been immensely successful in fostering this interaction, which helps students to have a broad introduction and exposure to research across nuclear physics, and to enable senior researchers to get to know some of the junior future leaders.

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