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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, May 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 500,000 registered nurses are expected to retire by 2022. To prevent a shortage of nurses in the healthcare field, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects over 1.1 million new nurses must enter the industry. The field of nursing provides job security, good wages, career advancement and diversity in the work environment. By becoming a nurse, the individual provides a fresh perspective of care and emotional support to patients and their family members. As an aging population sets the stage for a nursing shortage, the American Health Council has named its choices for “America’s Best Nursing Schools” as follows: With a long and rich history entrenched in academic excellence, and a distinguished alumnus that includes renowned achievers: Mary Adelaide Nutting (World’s First Professor of Nursing), Isabel Hampton Robb (Founder of Modern American Nursing and the First Dean of the University) and Ernestine Wiedenbach (Major Authority in Maternity and Clinical Nursing) to name a few, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing is an institution that continues to pioneer innovation in nursing and contemporary medicine. Founded in 1889, Johns Hopkins University prides itself as one of the oldest schools of nursing in the nation. Ranked #1 nationally among graduate schools of nursing, #3 for online programs, and named the most innovative graduate program in nursing in the country, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing offers an array of academic programs from pre-licensure to masters and PhD programs. Originally named “The Training School for Nurses,” Washington University in St. Louis School of Nursing was established in 1905. The university is a private research institute that is organized around seven schools including an outstanding medical and nursing school. At Washington University in St. Louis School of Nursing, prospective students will utilize new technology and real world experiences in their nursing academic programs. Students have an array of specialties to choose from including: neonatal and home care, nurse educator, pediatrics, family practitioner, forensics and much more, which provides students who graduate from this institution the opportunity for career growth in the nursing and healthcare industry. Located in Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania — also known as Penn Nursing — is ranked among the top graduate schools for nursing education in the United States. With a flexible undergraduate curriculum, Penn Nursing provides a traditional and fast track undergraduate program that includes a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree certificate attached at completion. This Ivy League institution has a 93% NCLEX pass rate for first-time US-educated test takers and is the only Ivy League institution to offer a bachelor’s, master’s and PhD degree program. Lastly, Penn Nursing is the ideal choice due to their laboratory of innovative and translational nursing research, where nurses can research on genetics, biochemistry, metabolism and much more. According to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) has been ranked 1st among the 100 best U.S. public colleges facilitating premium academics at an affordable price. With a reputation of excellence spanning three centuries, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill offers a solid undergraduate field of study which includes: 77 bachelor’s degrees, 109 master’s degrees and 66 doctoral degrees. The School of Nursing at UNC-Chapel Hill is recognized as one of the best in the nation in upholding excellence in education, practice and research in nursing. Each program is designed to provide students with the requisite knowledge, skills and understanding necessary to function effectively the field of nursing. Established in 1939, the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing consistently ranks high in several areas of specialization including: anesthesia, psychiatric/mental health clinical nursing, and pediatric primary care. Equipped with a faculty of fellows from the American Academy of Nursing, the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing is a top-notch nursing school offering undergraduate (BSN), accelerated 2nd degree BSN, post graduate (MSN), doctorate (Doctor of Nursing) and online programs respectively. Located in the heart of New York City’s Midtown Manhattan, New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing was originally founded in 1932 and over a decade later in 1947, the nursing education program was established. With a state-of-the-art clinical simulation center, the nursing school provides students with hands-on opportunities to become accustomed to the latest in medical procedures and tools. Ranked 5th overall in research funding by the National Institute of Health, NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing offers undergraduate, graduate and clinical health programs in both a traditional (4 years) and accelerated (15 months) setting. Nationally recognized as a research driven institution, Duke University School of Nursing was one of the first schools in the country to offer a graduate nursing program. Established in 1931, Duke University School of Nursing was developed under the direction of Dean Bessie Baker and Instructor Ann Henshaw Gardiner. As one of the nation’s top school of nursing, Duke University School of Nursing offers several undergraduate, post graduate and doctorate programs. Additionally, the nursing school offers online master’s and doctorate program to aid distance learning. Adorned in Georgian style architecture, the campus of Duke University is equipped with state-of-the-art cutting edge technology to bolster learning and research. Located in Cleveland, Ohio, Case Western University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing serves as the nation’s top ranked nursing school due to a rich history and culture of attaining distinction and innovation in nursing education, research and service provision. Established in 1923, Case Western University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing offers a four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, with an array of specialized master’s programs, tailor-made for students according to their dissenting educational interests and areas of practice. As the home of one of ten World Health Organization centers in the U.S., Case Western University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing is a pioneer in the development of the nation’s first practice doctorate in nursing, acute care nurse practitioner program, gerontological nursing program, BSN perioperative requirement, and the advanced practice flight nursing program. Founded in 1949, University of California Los Angeles School of Nursing is one of the professional schools of the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. With a faculty of forty-seven tenured and thirty-eight adjunct professors, UCLA School of Nursing provides the intimacy of a small school setting, coupled with the benefits of being a component of one of the world’s largest research universities. The school offers undergraduate, graduate, and PhD programs in nursing with a demanding course of study in both a classroom and clinical setting. Honored as the Top Public Recipient of NIH Research Funding for six consecutive years, the University of California San Francisco School of Nursing has upheld a reputation of exemplar of excellence and innovation.  With over a century long worth of nursing education history, UCSF School of Nursing has trained and graduated the next generation of leaders in the field of clinical care, policy development, academia and nursing research within the state and around the nation. The school offers a variety of undergraduate, graduate and doctorate programs in the following specialties: adult gerontology, occupational & environmental health nursing, sociology, advanced public health nursing, and much more. For more information on the “Best Nursing Schools in America” for 2017, please visit: https://bestinnursing.org/best-nursing-schools/ The American Health Council is the nation’s only organization with a constituency representative of all sectors of the healthcare industry. From the coasts to the heartland, the American Health Council has drawn Affiliates from major metropolitan hubs and small communities. These Affiliates span generations and have reached different stages of their careers — from recent graduates to retirees. More information about the American Health Council and its mission can be found at: http://americanhealthcouncil.org Additionally, the American Health Council strives to provide recognition and support for those individuals and institutions making the difference in patients’ lives day in and day out. Throughout 2017, the AHC is honoring “America’s Best Doctors and Nurses,” as well as the nation’s best medical universities and hospitals. The American Health Council’s “Best in Medicine” and “Best in Nursing” awards programs honor the individuals and institutions that have contributed significantly to medicine and nursing, as well as the training and education of physicians and nurses. The most current selections for these honors may be viewed here: http://bestinmedicine.org and http://bestinnursing.org.


TORONTO, ON / ACCESSWIRE / May 16, 2017 / ChroMedX Corp. (CSE: CHX) (OTCQB: MNLIF) (FSE: EIY2) (the "Company"), developer of the HemoPalm Handheld Blood Analyzer System, is pleased to announce the appointment of former Canadian Armed Forces officer, Capt (Retd) Greg Falck to the Company's advisory board. While in the military, Capt Falck led the development of a multitude of diverse technologies while commanding a special forces maintenance organization, liaising directly with industry and managing in-house teams. Capt Falck also coordinated the maintenance, acquisition, and deployment of cutting edge military equipment to operational theatres at the operational and strategic level. "Greg's experience in development, testing, and procurement in the military offers a unique insight into the modern defence industry and application of our technologies. Greg is a welcome addition to the advisory board and he will play a valuable role in our efforts to innovate and optimize the HemoPalm's performance for active military field use," said Ash Kaushal, President & CEO, ChroMedX Corp. "The dispersed and asymmetric nature of modern military operations has continued to push the boundaries of the medical system. Soldiers are often operating far from advanced care medical facilities with limited access to rapid medical evacuation. The HemoPalm would provide forward medical personnel with the diagnostic data needed to provide life-saving trauma care. I look forward to supporting the progression of this technology and its adoption into the global market," said Capt (Retd) Greg Falck. Greg Falck is a mechanical engineering graduate of Western University and spent nine years in the Canadian Armed Forces as an Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Officer. He spent most of his career within the Special Forces as a Platoon Commander and Logistics planner. Greg has travelled abroad extensively and worked with both American and Australian Special Forces units. Greg was awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2013. The United States' military medical expenditures are approximately 50 billion USD/annum or 10% of the total US defence industry. ChroMedX Corp. is a medical technology company focused on the development of novel medical devices for in vitro diagnostics and point-of-care testing. The devices are protected by the Company's issued and pending patents, dealing with blood collection, analysis and plasma/serum processing. The HemoPalm Handheld Blood Analyzer System is the only handheld blood analysis technology, which combines Blood Gases & Electrolytes with full CO-oximetry. Currently this combination is not available on any of the handheld analyzers on the market. Existing technologies require users to purchase a second device to carry out the CO-oximetry. The Company's technology has the advantage of being able to offer a single handheld blood analyzer that provides all the required tests for Blood Gases & Electrolytes, with full CO-oximetry and bilirubin. Another competitive advantage of the HemoPalm system will be its ability to draw capillary blood directly from a pin-prick site into the cartridge, providing an alternative to arterial blood. Drawing arterial blood is painful and can cause nerve damage. CO-oximetry is the measurement of five different hemoglobin species in blood. The global market for Blood Gases & Electrolytes was estimated to be 1.5 billion $US in 2015 and is projected to reach over 1.8 billion by 2020. NEITHER THE CANADIAN SECURITIES EXCHANGE NOR ITS REGULATIONS SERVICES PROVIDER HAVE REVIEWED OR ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THIS RELEASE. Except for statements of historic fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable securities law. Forward-looking information is frequently characterized by words such as "plan," "expect," "project," "intend," "believe," "anticipate," "estimate," and other similar words, or statements that certain events or conditions "may" or "will" occur. Forward-looking statements are based on the opinions and estimates at the date the statements are made, and are subject to a variety of risks and uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements including, but not limited to delays or uncertainties with regulatory approvals, including that of the CSE. There are uncertainties inherent in forward-looking information, including factors beyond the Company's control. The Company undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking information if circumstances or management's estimates or opinions should change except as required by law. The reader is cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Additional information identifying risks and uncertainties that could affect financial results is contained in the Company's filings with Canadian securities regulators, which filings are available at www.sedar.com.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, May 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 500,000 registered nurses are expected to retire by 2022. To prevent a shortage of nurses in the healthcare field, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects over 1.1 million new nurses must enter the industry. The field of nursing provides job security, good wages, career advancement and diversity in the work environment. By becoming a nurse, the individual provides a fresh perspective of care and emotional support to patients and their family members. As an aging population sets the stage for a nursing shortage, the American Health Council has named its choices for “America’s Best Nursing Schools” as follows: With a long and rich history entrenched in academic excellence, and a distinguished alumnus that includes renowned achievers: Mary Adelaide Nutting (World’s First Professor of Nursing), Isabel Hampton Robb (Founder of Modern American Nursing and the First Dean of the University) and Ernestine Wiedenbach (Major Authority in Maternity and Clinical Nursing) to name a few, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing is an institution that continues to pioneer innovation in nursing and contemporary medicine. Founded in 1889, Johns Hopkins University prides itself as one of the oldest schools of nursing in the nation. Ranked #1 nationally among graduate schools of nursing, #3 for online programs, and named the most innovative graduate program in nursing in the country, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing offers an array of academic programs from pre-licensure to masters and PhD programs. Originally named “The Training School for Nurses,” Washington University in St. Louis School of Nursing was established in 1905. The university is a private research institute that is organized around seven schools including an outstanding medical and nursing school. At Washington University in St. Louis School of Nursing, prospective students will utilize new technology and real world experiences in their nursing academic programs. Students have an array of specialties to choose from including: neonatal and home care, nurse educator, pediatrics, family practitioner, forensics and much more, which provides students who graduate from this institution the opportunity for career growth in the nursing and healthcare industry. Located in Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania — also known as Penn Nursing — is ranked among the top graduate schools for nursing education in the United States. With a flexible undergraduate curriculum, Penn Nursing provides a traditional and fast track undergraduate program that includes a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree certificate attached at completion. This Ivy League institution has a 93% NCLEX pass rate for first-time US-educated test takers and is the only Ivy League institution to offer a bachelor’s, master’s and PhD degree program. Lastly, Penn Nursing is the ideal choice due to their laboratory of innovative and translational nursing research, where nurses can research on genetics, biochemistry, metabolism and much more. According to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) has been ranked 1st among the 100 best U.S. public colleges facilitating premium academics at an affordable price. With a reputation of excellence spanning three centuries, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill offers a solid undergraduate field of study which includes: 77 bachelor’s degrees, 109 master’s degrees and 66 doctoral degrees. The School of Nursing at UNC-Chapel Hill is recognized as one of the best in the nation in upholding excellence in education, practice and research in nursing. Each program is designed to provide students with the requisite knowledge, skills and understanding necessary to function effectively the field of nursing. Established in 1939, the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing consistently ranks high in several areas of specialization including: anesthesia, psychiatric/mental health clinical nursing, and pediatric primary care. Equipped with a faculty of fellows from the American Academy of Nursing, the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing is a top-notch nursing school offering undergraduate (BSN), accelerated 2nd degree BSN, post graduate (MSN), doctorate (Doctor of Nursing) and online programs respectively. Located in the heart of New York City’s Midtown Manhattan, New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing was originally founded in 1932 and over a decade later in 1947, the nursing education program was established. With a state-of-the-art clinical simulation center, the nursing school provides students with hands-on opportunities to become accustomed to the latest in medical procedures and tools. Ranked 5th overall in research funding by the National Institute of Health, NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing offers undergraduate, graduate and clinical health programs in both a traditional (4 years) and accelerated (15 months) setting. Nationally recognized as a research driven institution, Duke University School of Nursing was one of the first schools in the country to offer a graduate nursing program. Established in 1931, Duke University School of Nursing was developed under the direction of Dean Bessie Baker and Instructor Ann Henshaw Gardiner. As one of the nation’s top school of nursing, Duke University School of Nursing offers several undergraduate, post graduate and doctorate programs. Additionally, the nursing school offers online master’s and doctorate program to aid distance learning. Adorned in Georgian style architecture, the campus of Duke University is equipped with state-of-the-art cutting edge technology to bolster learning and research. Located in Cleveland, Ohio, Case Western University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing serves as the nation’s top ranked nursing school due to a rich history and culture of attaining distinction and innovation in nursing education, research and service provision. Established in 1923, Case Western University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing offers a four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, with an array of specialized master’s programs, tailor-made for students according to their dissenting educational interests and areas of practice. As the home of one of ten World Health Organization centers in the U.S., Case Western University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing is a pioneer in the development of the nation’s first practice doctorate in nursing, acute care nurse practitioner program, gerontological nursing program, BSN perioperative requirement, and the advanced practice flight nursing program. Founded in 1949, University of California Los Angeles School of Nursing is one of the professional schools of the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. With a faculty of forty-seven tenured and thirty-eight adjunct professors, UCLA School of Nursing provides the intimacy of a small school setting, coupled with the benefits of being a component of one of the world’s largest research universities. The school offers undergraduate, graduate, and PhD programs in nursing with a demanding course of study in both a classroom and clinical setting. Honored as the Top Public Recipient of NIH Research Funding for six consecutive years, the University of California San Francisco School of Nursing has upheld a reputation of exemplar of excellence and innovation.  With over a century long worth of nursing education history, UCSF School of Nursing has trained and graduated the next generation of leaders in the field of clinical care, policy development, academia and nursing research within the state and around the nation. The school offers a variety of undergraduate, graduate and doctorate programs in the following specialties: adult gerontology, occupational & environmental health nursing, sociology, advanced public health nursing, and much more. For more information on the “Best Nursing Schools in America” for 2017, please visit: https://bestinnursing.org/best-nursing-schools/ The American Health Council is the nation’s only organization with a constituency representative of all sectors of the healthcare industry. From the coasts to the heartland, the American Health Council has drawn Affiliates from major metropolitan hubs and small communities. These Affiliates span generations and have reached different stages of their careers — from recent graduates to retirees. More information about the American Health Council and its mission can be found at: http://americanhealthcouncil.org Additionally, the American Health Council strives to provide recognition and support for those individuals and institutions making the difference in patients’ lives day in and day out. Throughout 2017, the AHC is honoring “America’s Best Doctors and Nurses,” as well as the nation’s best medical universities and hospitals. The American Health Council’s “Best in Medicine” and “Best in Nursing” awards programs honor the individuals and institutions that have contributed significantly to medicine and nursing, as well as the training and education of physicians and nurses. The most current selections for these honors may be viewed here: http://bestinmedicine.org and http://bestinnursing.org.


While in the military, Capt Falck led the development of a multitude of diverse technologies while commanding a special forces maintenance organization, liaising directly with industry and managing in-house teams. Capt Falck also coordinated the maintenance, acquisition, and deployment of cutting edge military equipment to operational theatres at the operational and strategic level. "Greg's experience in development, testing, and procurement in the military offers a unique insight into the modern defence industry and application of our technologies. Greg is a welcome addition to the advisory board and he will play a valuable role in our efforts to innovate and optimize the HemoPalm's performance for active military field use," said Ash Kaushal, President & CEO, ChroMedX Corp. "The dispersed and asymmetric nature of modern military operations has continued to push the boundaries of the medical system. Soldiers are often operating far from advanced care medical facilities with limited access to rapid medical evacuation. The HemoPalm would provide forward medical personnel with the diagnostic data needed to provide life-saving trauma care. I look forward to supporting the progression of this technology and its adoption into the global market," said Capt (Retd) Greg Falck. Greg Falck is a mechanical engineering graduate of Western University and spent nine years in the Canadian Armed Forces as an Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Officer. He spent most of his career within the Special Forces as a Platoon Commander and Logistics planner. Greg has travelled abroad extensively and worked with both American and Australian Special Forces units. Greg was awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2013. The United States' military medical expenditures are approximately 50 billion USD/annum or 10% of the total US defence industry. ChroMedX Corp. is a medical technology company focused on the development of novel medical devices for in vitro diagnostics and point-of-care testing. The devices are protected by the Company's issued and pending patents, dealing with blood collection, analysis and plasma/serum processing. The HemoPalm Handheld Blood Analyzer System is the only handheld blood analysis technology, which combines Blood Gases & Electrolytes with full CO-oximetry. Currently this combination is not available on any of the handheld analyzers on the market. Existing technologies require users to purchase a second device to carry out the CO-oximetry. The Company's technology has the advantage of being able to offer a single handheld blood analyzer that provides all the required tests for Blood Gases & Electrolytes, with full CO-oximetry and bilirubin. Another competitive advantage of the HemoPalm system will be its ability to draw capillary blood directly from a pin-prick site into the cartridge, providing an alternative to arterial blood. Drawing arterial blood is painful and can cause nerve damage. CO-oximetry is the measurement of five different hemoglobin species in blood. The global market for Blood Gases & Electrolytes was estimated to be 1.5 billion $US in 2015 and is projected to reach over 1.8 billion by 2020. NEITHER THE CANADIAN SECURITIES EXCHANGE NOR ITS REGULATIONS SERVICES PROVIDER HAVE REVIEWED OR ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THIS RELEASE. Except for statements of historic fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable securities law. Forward-looking information is frequently characterized by words such as "plan," "expect," "project," "intend," "believe," "anticipate," "estimate," and other similar words, or statements that certain events or conditions "may" or "will" occur. Forward-looking statements are based on the opinions and estimates at the date the statements are made, and are subject to a variety of risks and uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements including, but not limited to delays or uncertainties with regulatory approvals, including that of the CSE. There are uncertainties inherent in forward-looking information, including factors beyond the Company's control. The Company undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking information if circumstances or management's estimates or opinions should change except as required by law. The reader is cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Additional information identifying risks and uncertainties that could affect financial results is contained in the Company's filings with Canadian securities regulators, which filings are available at www.sedar.com.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Delta Dental of California is recognizing six exemplary dental school students with the F. Gene Dixon Student Leadership Award and a grant for $20,000 each. The 2017 F. Gene Dixon Student Leadership Awards recognize graduating dental school students who demonstrate outstanding leadership abilities. The awards were established in 1977 in honor of the late Dr. F. Gene Dixon, the first chief executive officer of Delta Dental of California, which is now part of the largest dental benefits delivery system in the country. This year’s recipients are Christopher A. Chan of Loma Linda University, Michael Stout of University of the Pacific, Mona Nejad of UC San Francisco, Mishaun Sahebi of the University of Southern California, Diana Wang of UCLA and Bao-Tran Truong of Western University. “We’re proud to recognize these outstanding dental students by awarding them for their remarkable achievements,” said Ken Yale, DDS, Delta Dental’s chief clinical officer. “They each have displayed strong leadership skills, a dedication for serving others and a passion for the field of dentistry.” About Delta Dental of California Delta Dental of California, Delta Dental of New York, Inc., Delta Dental of Pennsylvania and Delta Dental Insurance Company, along with their affiliated companies, together provide dental benefits to nearly 35 million people in 15 states plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. All are part of the Delta Dental Plans Association, whose member companies collectively cover 74 million people nationwide.


SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Illumina, Inc. (NASDAQ: ILMN) announced today that Mark Van Oene has been named Chief Commercial Officer. Van Oene was previously Illumina’s Senior Vice President of the Americas region and subsequently named interim Chief Commercial Officer in late 2016. “Mark is a great leader for our commercial organization, possessing deep genomics expertise and over a decade of experience building and running strong sales and marketing teams,” said Francis deSouza, Illumina President and Chief Executive Officer. “As interim Chief Commercial Officer Mark has guided Illumina through two strong quarters, including the launch of NovaSeq, and laid the foundation for our future growth. I am excited to continue to work closely with Mark to expand our commercial capability as we grow in research and clinical markets around the world.” Van Oene joined Illumina in 2006 as Regional Account Manager for Canada. In 2008, Van Oene was promoted to Senior Director of Sales for the Americas. Four years later, he was promoted to Vice President with responsibility for global sales. From 2012 through 2014, Van Oene led the team to grow revenues from $1.06B to $1.42B. In early 2014, Van Oene was named the General Manager for the Americas region, advancing to Senior Vice President in April 2016. During that time, the Americas compound annual growth rate exceeded 20%. As Chief Commercial Officer, Van Oene will be responsible for world-wide sales, services and marketing at Illumina. He will report to President and CEO, Francis deSouza. Van Oene earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry from Western University in London, Ontario, Canada. Illumina is improving human health by unlocking the power of the genome. Our focus on innovation has established us as the global leader in DNA sequencing and array-based technologies, serving customers in the research, clinical and applied markets. Our products are used for applications in the life sciences, oncology, reproductive health, agriculture, and other emerging segments. To learn more, visit www.illumina.com and follow @illumina.


In a new study, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University are demonstrating that gait, or motion testing, while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task can be an effective predictor of progression to dementia and eventually help with earlier diagnosis. To date, there is no definitive way for health care professionals to forecast the onset of dementia in a patient with memory complaints. Dr. Manuel Montero-Odasso, a Lawson scientist, geriatrician at St. Joseph's Health Care London, and associate professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine at Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, is leading the "Gait and Brain Study." His team is assessing up to 150 seniors with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a slight decline of memory and other mental functions which is considered a pre-dementia syndrome, in order to detect an early predictor of cognitive and mobility decline and progression to dementia. "Finding methods to detect dementia early is vital to our ability to slow or halt the progression of the disease," says Dr. Montero-Odasso. The study, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, followed participants for six years and included bi-annual visits. Researchers asked participants to walk while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task, such as counting backwards or naming animals. Those individuals with MCI that slow down more than 20 per cent while performing a cognitively demanding task are at a higher risk of progressing to dementia. "While walking has long been considered an automatic motor task, emerging evidence suggests cognitive function plays a key role in the control of walking, avoidance of obstacles and maintenance of navigation," says Dr. Montero-Odasso. "We believe that gait, as a complex brain-motor task, provides a golden window of opportunity to see brain function." The "gait cost," or speed at which participants completed a single task (walking) versus a dual-task, was higher in those MCI individuals with worse episodic memory and who struggle with executive functions such as attention keeping and time management. "Our results reveal a 'motor signature' of cognitive impairment that can be used to predict dementia," adds Dr. Montero-Odasso. "It is conceivable that we will be able to diagnose Alzheimer's disease and other dementias before people even have significant memory loss. Our hope is to combine these methods with promising new medications to slow or halt the progression of MCI to dementia." The study, "Association of Dual-Task Gait with Incident Dementia in Mild Cognitive Impairment", was published in the journal, JAMA Neurology.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Almost two billion years ago, a 10-kilometre-wide chunk of space slammed down into rock near what is now the city of Sudbury. Now, scientists from Western University and the University of Portsmouth are marrying details of that meteorite impact with technology that measures surrounding crystal fragments as a way to date other ancient meteorite strikes. The pioneering technique is helping add context and insight into the age of meteor impacts. And ultimately, it provides new clues into the beginnings of life on this planet and others, said Desmond (Des) Moser, associate professor in the Departments of Earth Sciences and Geography at Western. "The underlying theme is, when did life begin? We know that it couldn't happen as long as the surface was being periodically vaporized by meteorite strikes during the solar system's early years and youth -- so if we can figure out when those strikes stopped, we can then understand a bit more about how we got here, and when." In this instance, researchers have been able to use new imaging techniques to measure the atomic nanostructure of ancient crystals at impact locations, using the 150-kilometre-wide crater at Sudbury as a test site. Shock waves from that meteorite impact deformed the minerals that made up the rock beneath the crater, including small, tough crystals that contain trace amounts of radioactive uranium and lead. "These can be used as tiny clocks that are the basis for our geologic time scale," Moser said. "But because these crystals are a banged-up mess, conventional methods won't help in extracting age data from them." An international team using specialized instruments at Western's Zircon and Accessory Phase Laboratory (ZAPLab) and a new instrument called the atom probe, at CAMECA Laboratories in the US, have made that job easier. With the probe, researchers are able to slice and lift out tiny pieces of crystal baddeleyite which is common in terrestrial, Martian and lunar rocks and meteorites. Then Moser's team -- including researcher Lee White and co-supervisor James Darling of the University of Portsmouth -- measured the deformation in the crystals after sharpening and polishing the pieces into extremely fine needles, then evaporated and identified the atoms and their isotopes layer by layer. The result is a 3D model of the atoms and their positions. "Using the atom probe to go from the rock to the crystal to its atomic level is like zooming in with the ultimate Google Earth," Moser says. This atomic-scale approach holds great potential in establishing a more accurate chronology of the formation and evolution of planetary crusts. The team's findings are published in the journal Nature Communications.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Almost two billion years ago, a 10-kilometre-wide chunk of space slammed down into rock near what is now the city of Sudbury. Now, scientists from Western University and the University of Portsmouth are marrying details of that meteorite impact with technology that measures surrounding crystal fragments as a way to date other ancient meteorite strikes. The pioneering technique is helping add context and insight into the age of meteor impacts. And ultimately, it provides new clues into the beginnings of life on this planet and others, said Desmond (Des) Moser, associate professor in the Departments of Earth Sciences and Geography at Western. "The underlying theme is, when did life begin? We know that it couldn't happen as long as the surface was being periodically vaporized by meteorite strikes during the solar system's early years and youth -- so if we can figure out when those strikes stopped, we can then understand a bit more about how we got here, and when." In this instance, researchers have been able to use new imaging techniques to measure the atomic nanostructure of ancient crystals at impact locations, using the 150-kilometre-wide crater at Sudbury as a test site. Shock waves from that meteorite impact deformed the minerals that made up the rock beneath the crater, including small, tough crystals that contain trace amounts of radioactive uranium and lead. "These can be used as tiny clocks that are the basis for our geologic time scale," Moser said. "But because these crystals are a banged-up mess, conventional methods won't help in extracting age data from them." An international team using specialized instruments at Western's Zircon and Accessory Phase Laboratory (ZAPLab) and a new instrument called the atom probe, at CAMECA Laboratories in the US, have made that job easier. With the probe, researchers are able to slice and lift out tiny pieces of crystal baddeleyite which is common in terrestrial, Martian and lunar rocks and meteorites. Then Moser's team -- including researcher Lee White and co-supervisor James Darling of the University of Portsmouth -- measured the deformation in the crystals after sharpening and polishing the pieces into extremely fine needles, then evaporated and identified the atoms and their isotopes layer by layer. The result is a 3D model of the atoms and their positions. "Using the atom probe to go from the rock to the crystal to its atomic level is like zooming in with the ultimate Google Earth," Moser says. This atomic-scale approach holds great potential in establishing a more accurate chronology of the formation and evolution of planetary crusts. The team's findings are published in the journal Nature Communications. MEDIA CONTACT: Debora Van Brenk, Media Relations Officer, Western University, 519-661-2111 x85165, or on mobile at 519-318-0657 and deb.vanbrenk@uwo.ca ABOUT WESTERN: Western University delivers an academic experience second to none. Since 1878, The Western Experience has combined academic excellence with life-long opportunities for intellectual, social and cultural growth in order to better serve our communities. Our research excellence expands knowledge and drives discovery with real-world application. Western attracts individuals with a broad worldview, seeking to study, influence and lead in the international community.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

In a new study, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University are demonstrating that gait, or motion testing, while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task can be an effective predictor of progression to dementia and eventually help with earlier diagnosis. To date, there is no definitive way for health care professionals to forecast the onset of dementia in a patient with memory complaints. Dr. Manuel Montero-Odasso, a Lawson scientist, geriatrician at St. Joseph's Health Care London, and associate professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine at Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, is leading the "Gait and Brain Study." His team is assessing up to 150 seniors with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a slight decline of memory and other mental functions which is considered a pre-dementia syndrome, in order to detect an early predictor of cognitive and mobility decline and progression to dementia. "Finding methods to detect dementia early is vital to our ability to slow or halt the progression of the disease," says Dr. Montero-Odasso. The study, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, followed participants for six years and included bi-annual visits. Researchers asked participants to walk while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task, such as counting backwards or naming animals. Those individuals with MCI that slow down more than 20 per cent while performing a cognitively demanding task are at a higher risk of progressing to dementia. "While walking has long been considered an automatic motor task, emerging evidence suggests cognitive function plays a key role in the control of walking, avoidance of obstacles and maintenance of navigation," says Dr. Montero-Odasso. "We believe that gait, as a complex brain-motor task, provides a golden window of opportunity to see brain function." The "gait cost," or speed at which participants completed a single task (walking) versus a dual-task, was higher in those MCI individuals with worse episodic memory and who struggle with executive functions such as attention keeping and time management. "Our results reveal a 'motor signature' of cognitive impairment that can be used to predict dementia," adds Dr. Montero-Odasso. "It is conceivable that we will be able to diagnose Alzheimer's disease and other dementias before people even have significant memory loss. Our hope is to combine these methods with promising new medications to slow or halt the progression of MCI to dementia."

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