San Juan de Mata, Philippines
San Juan de Mata, Philippines

The Western Philippines University is a state higher education institution located at Aborlan, Palawan. The University began as the Aborlan Farm Settlement School for the Tagbanuas in 1910. It became the Aborlan Agricultural High School in 1928 and the Palawan Regional Agricultural School in 1960. It was renamed Palawan National School in 1962 and became the Palawan National Agricultural College in 1963. Its name was again changed to State Polytechnic College of Palawan in 1995 by virtue of RA 8012, and in 2004, President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo signed RA 9260 converting it to Western Philippines University. Wikipedia.


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Dolorosa R.G.,University of East Anglia | Dolorosa R.G.,Western Philippines University | Grant A.,University of East Anglia | Gill J.A.,University of East Anglia | And 2 more authors.
Reviews in Fisheries Science | Year: 2013

The high demand for shells of the large reef-associated gastropod Trochus niloticus in the manufacture of mother-of-pearl buttons has resulted in a widespread decline of its population. As a consequence, juvenile mass production and restocking has been practiced as one of the many conservation measures. Trochus has long been successfully bred in captivity, but culturing of juveniles until ready for release is faced with many problems, including the shortage of natural food. Terrestrial plants have traditionally been used by fishermen as food in keeping wild trochus juveniles, but their potential use in intermediate culture of trochus has not been evaluated. We conducted four growth trials for 60-120 days, rearing hatchery-produced juveniles (10-28-mm shell diameter) at different stocking densities in indoor tanks and sea cages, with coconut leaves as the main or an additional substrate. An average growth rate of 4.4 mm mo-1 (95% CL 4.0-4.7 mm mo-1) for all stocking densities was achieved in growth trials using small cages deployed at 5-6 m on the reef slope, which was comparable to growth rates in the wild. This growth rate was three times higher than in trials using large metal cages on the reef slope, and 2 to 23 times higher than indoor trials using wooden tanks or small cages in concrete tanks. Survival rates were as high as 99%. Incidence of escape in sub-tidal cages was low except when some cages were damaged by strong waves. The results indicate that trochus juveniles can be successfully cultured at high density in sub-tidal cages with coconut leaves as substrate. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Dolorosa R.G.,University of East Anglia | Dolorosa R.G.,Western Philippines University | Grant A.,University of East Anglia | Gill J.A.,University of East Anglia
Reviews in Fisheries Science | Year: 2013

Intentional release of wild-caught individuals has been widely used to establish new populations of the commercially valuable but threatened reef gastropod Trochus niloticus in oceanic islands. Is this also a viable strategy to enhance depleted populations of this species and other marine invertebrates? We monitored growth and survival of 765 translocated individuals and 486 in their original habitat for 5-9 months. Individuals translocated to a severely overexploited reef (mainland Palawan) grew 2-3 times faster than those at Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park, Phillipines. Despite variations in growth between the three sites, survival probabilities were consistently high, ranging between 0.77 and 0.92. So translocation is feasible, and sites at which a species has previously been found are likely to be suitable for their growth and survival. If site management can control over-fishing, this approach is likely to be a valuable tool for enhancing field populations of a large invertebrates like Trochus that have a short lived planktonic larva. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Sopsop L.B.,Western Philippines University | Buot I.E.,Institute of Biological science
Journal of Environmental Science and Management | Year: 2011

An interview of the direct users of the forest ecosystem in Aborlan Guba System was conducted to determine their socioeconomic characteristics and to examine and understand the role of Non-wood forest products (NWFP) in their household economy. The direct users of the forest were poor Indigenous Peoples and migrants from the Visayas region who were dependent on the NWFP as their immediate source of income; this is to support their basic needs and the education of their children. Harvesting practices by these local people were observed as non sustainable. If ilization practices continue unregulated, these resources are projected to become in danger. This will also endanger the life of the direct users, especially the Tagbanuas whose way of life is intimately connected with the Aborlan Guba System. The local government unit of Aborlan and other organizations should help create employment opportunities for the local people and help strengthen the community's farming system practices to increase their income. The people must be empowered to maximize their full potentials in exploring various livelihood opportunities without depleting the forest resources.


Dolorosa R.G.,Western Philippines University | Picardal R.M.,Western Philippines University | Conales S.F.,Tubbataha Management Office
Check List | Year: 2015

in this study of marine bivalves and gastropods of Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park (TRNP), Palawan, Philippines, we photo-document 96 species, including 17 species of bivalves (in seven families), and 79 species of gastropods (in 29 families). Of these, 64 species (eight bivalves and 56 gastropods species) were new recorded from the park. The list also includes the seven species of giant clams which are protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and three nationally protected gastropod species (Cassis cornuta, Charonia tritonis and Tectus niloticus). Thirty-six species that were previously reported at the park were not found in this study, which suggests that there are at least 132 species of gastropods and bivalves at TRNP. Our observations were limited at intertidal and shallow subtidal reefs in the park, suggesting that the number of species in the list may rise with an extensive survey. © 2015 Check List and Authors.


Dolorosa R.G.,Western Philippines University | Conales S.F.,Tubbataha Management Office | Bundal N.A.,Tubbataha Management Office
Atoll Research Bulletin | Year: 2013

The horned helmet Cassis cornuta, a protected species in some countries, is one of the largest reef gastropods that had been traditionally collected for food and for its shells as ornaments. In the Philippines, this protected species is rarely seen in habitats close to human settlement. However, in a protected area like the Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park (TRNP), C. cornuta are commonly encountered at the vicinity of the Ranger Station. With a dearth of information about this giant reef gastropod, notes on marked-recaptured C. cornuta in TRNP were taken from December 2009 until January 2011; and its trade was noted through surveys of some souvenir shops in Puerto Princesa City. Most of the sampled C. cornuta were large, suggesting the absence of exploitation at the study site. Regression analyses suggest that the shell's dimensions are significant determinants of body weight. Growth rates declined as shell size increased. Although exploitation of C. cornuta is prohibited under the Philippine law, their shells were openly displayed for sale in a number of souvenir shops in Puerto Princesa City. Given the limited area covered in this study, a nationwide survey is needed to fully document its status in the wild and the extent of its trade. Information on population, growth, survival, other aspects of its biology and its exploitation are needed in proposing a more relevant conservation measure for this vanishing giant reef gastropod.


Dolorosa R.G.,Western Philippines University | Werding B.,Justus Liebig University
Bulletin of Marine Science | Year: 2014

A mangrove-inhabiting porcelain crab, Enosteoides philippinensis sp. nov., is described based on material collected from Palawan Island, the Philippines. It is the fifth species of the genus and different from its congeners in having an extremely setose body, one to five spines on the proximal half of the outer margin of the chela, two lobes on the anterior margin of the basal article of the antennular peduncle, and two to four strong spines on the mesobranchial regions. © 2014 Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science of the University of Miami.


Maeda K.,Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology | Palla H.P.,Western Philippines University
Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Palawan is an island in the western Philippines, and the freshwater fish fauna of this island has received limited research attention. In the present study, a new goby species, Stiphodon palawanensis, is described on the basis of 57 specimens collected from freshwater streams on the island. This species can be distinguished from its congeners by having nine seg-mented rays in the second dorsal fin, 15 rays in the pectoral fin, a pointed first dorsal fin in males, premaxilla with 45-71 tricuspid teeth, the nape and posterior half of the occipital region covered by cycloid scales, 9-11 dusky transverse bars laterally on the trunk and tail, a line of black blotches (in male) or a black band (in female) on the distal part of the second dorsal fin, and the first dorsal and pectoral fins lacking distinctive markings. The new species has been found only on the Sulu Sea side of central Palawan. Three congeners, S. percnopterygionus, S. atropurpureus, and S. pulchellus have also been recorded from Palawan. Copyright © 2015 Magnolia Press.


Sopsop L.B.,Western Philippines University
Journal of Environmental Science and Management | Year: 2011

Being the home of the critically endangered Philippine cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia), Rasa Island in Narra, Palawan is one of the most important sites for conservation. The mangrove and the coastal forests therein serve as a critical support of the wildlife inhabitants in the island. A survey was done in the coastal forest of Rasa Island to document the plant species in the area. At least 68 plant species, believed to be the primary food of the Philippine cockatoo and other wildlife in the island are found in the coastal forest area. At least one Palawan and one Philippine endemic species are encountered, while six species are included in the different threatened categories of the 2007 IUCN Red List and in Fernando et al. (2008) and Sopsop & Buot (2009) lists. At least five stands of Garuga floribunda Decne var. floribunda served as nesting trees of the critically endangered bird when the survey was conducted. There is a need to strictly protect this remaining coastal forest patch and the whole Rasa Island to conserve the critically endangered Philippine cockatoo and the many wildlife species in the island.


Gonzales B.J.,Western Philippines University | Gonzales M.M.G.,Western Philippines University
AACL Bioflux | Year: 2016

Coral Bay is the main source of marine-based food to the people of Bataraza, Palawan. Rio Tuba being one of the most populated barangays of Palawan has the challenge to balance the utilization and protection of bay’s resources. Hence, the author analyzed results of socio-economic studies conducted in the area and the 3-year coral and fish assessments results to form as basis for its future EAFM/coastal management plan. In order to discern possible impacts of developments, the bay was divided into two zones according to distance from development sites: landward and seaward zones. Fishers of Coral Bay averaged 46 years-old with 4.25 average number of children. Trading/vending of dried and fresh fishes was dominated by women, while aquaculture and capture fisheries by men. From 2007 to 2009, all fish indicators in stations at Landward Zone either remained the same or have improved conditions, except for decreased in fish biomass in two stations, while in seaward zone fishes have generally decreased in abundance and biomass. The live coral cover trend increased in landward zone at 1.0%/year, while 4.4%/year decreased in seaward zone. The fish density (abundance) in landward zone has increased to 25% from previous average density in three years, while has decreased to 39% in the seaward zone. The average fish biomass per year in the landward zone (3.53 kg/250 m2) was more than three times than that in the seaward zone (1.15 kg/250 m2) in 2009. This may be because the seaward zone was open to any kind of fishing, including destructive means. While the landward zone has an in-placed security systems provided by private sectors that prevented destructive fishing and therefore might have protected coral and fish resources. In addition, the landward zone has viable population of crocodiles known to enrich estuarine waters that enhances primary productivity and growth of resources. This situations showed that in Coral Bay, proper protection of coastal fishing grounds and resources is a must, whether located near or far settlement/development areas. This study manifests that natural resources adjacent to heavy human population are not necessarily at risk as long as the protection mechanisms are properly in-placed. Hence, the local government must jointly plan with private sectors on how to institutionalize and perpetuate the protection of the bay’s resources and more studies like siltation and chemical analysis shall be conducted to augment the results of this study. Information gaps for appropriate management of the bay were recommended in this paper. © 2016, BIOFLUX SRL. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology and Western Philippines University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Palawan is an island in the western Philippines, and the freshwater fish fauna of this island has received limited research attention. In the present study, a new goby species, Stiphodon palawanensis, is described on the basis of 57 specimens collected from freshwater streams on the island. This species can be distinguished from its congeners by having nine segmented rays in the second dorsal fin, 15 rays in the pectoral fin, a pointed first dorsal fin in males, premaxilla with 45-71 tricuspid teeth, the nape and posterior half of the occipital region covered by cycloid scales, 9-11 dusky transverse bars laterally on the trunk and tail, a line of black blotches (in male) or a black band (in female) on the distal part of the second dorsal fin, and the first dorsal and pectoral fins lacking distinctive markings. The new species has been found only on the Sulu Sea side of central Palawan. Three congeners, S. percnopterygionus, S. atropurpureus, and S. pulchellus have also been recorded from Palawan.

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