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Glicklich D.,Westchester Medical Center | Glicklich D.,New York Medical College | Frishman W.H.,New York Medical College
Drugs | Year: 2015

Abstract Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mmHg despite three different antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. aTRH is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke, chronic renal failure, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, aortic aneurysm, atrial fibrillation, and sudden death. Preliminary studies of renal nerve ablation as a therapy to control aTRH were encouraging. However, these results were not confirmed by the Symplicity 3 trial. Therefore, attention has refocused on drug therapy. Secondary forms of hypertension and associated conditions such as obesity, sleep apnea, and primary aldosteronism are common in patients with aTRH. The pivotal role of aldosterone in the pathogenesis of aTRH in many cases is well recognized. For patients with aTRH, the Joint National Committee-8, the European Society of Hypertension, and a recent consensus conference recommend that a diuretic, ACE inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker and calcium channel blocker combination be used to maximally tolerated doses before starting a 'fourth-line' drug such as a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Although the best fourth-line drug for aTRH has not been extensively investigated, a number of studies summarized here show that an MR antagonist is effective in reducing BP when added to the standard multi-drug regimen. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.


Cooper H.A.,Medstar Washington Hospital Center | Panza J.A.,Westchester Medical Center
Cardiology Clinics | Year: 2013

Cardiogenic shock (CS) is a condition in which a marked reduction in cardiac output and inadequate end-organ perfusion results from an array of cardiac insults, the most common of which is acute myocardial infarction. CS is a systemic disease involving a vicious cycle of inflammation, ischemia, and progressive myocardial dysfunction, which often results in death. This life-threatening emergency requires intensive monitoring accompanied by aggressive hemodynamic support; other therapies are tailored to the specific pathophysiology. The development of novel therapeutic strategies is urgently required to reduce the unacceptably high mortality rates currently associated with CS. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

On November 2, Pediatric Cancer Foundation (PCF), a Mamaroneck-based nonprofit committed to fighting pediatric cancer, will host the Rock The Cure Annual Gala at Brae Burn Country Club in Purchase, New York. The evening will feature legendary rock music performed by NYC’s Unforgettable Fire, “the world’s greatest U2 Tribute Band,” live and silent auctions and delicious food and drink. The gala is expected to draw hundreds of loyal supporters and rock ‘n roll fans, young philanthropists and advocates for pediatric cancer awareness. PCF’s mission is to find a cure for childhood cancer. The 501(c) (3) nonprofit raises money for research, state of the art equipment/ instruments and patient/parent care for world-renowned doctors at the hospitals PCF supports. These hospitals include: New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at NYU Langone Medical Center, Feinstein Institute of Medical Research - Northwell Health, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center and Comer Children’s Hospital, The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences. “The goal of our gala is to help raise awareness and much needed funds to fight childhood cancers. More than 2,300 children (from birth to 21 years of age) will die each year from cancer, the causes of which are still unknown, and our funding helps critical research to attack this issue,” explains Bonnie Shyer, PCF president. “We’ve raised countless dollars over the past 45 years and these precious funds help everyone on the front lines of the disease, from children and their families to brilliant medical professionals, all of whom are the soldiers in this battle.” This year’s event will be in memory of Paul Ulysses Jimenez, a 10 year-old Westchester boy who passed away in January, 2016, from a rare form of cancer in the skeletal muscles called Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). “Paul’s life and his parents’ effort to help their son fight cancer are an inspiration to all of us at PCF,” said Shyer. “We are thankful for the life he led and the example he set, and are honored to host this year’s gala in his memory.” What started out as a grassroots organization has now become a nationally-recognized nonprofit. With the inclusion of advanced technological equipment that the organization supports, PCF-funded doctors are in communication with hospitals both nationally as well as on an international level. PCF has grown to include support for children and their families afflicted with all types of cancer. Three decades of support has enabled the foundation to purchase state-of-the-art equipment, support research projects and bring exceptional fellows to both the surgical and oncology departments. PCF receives no funding from the government or Westchester County and is efficiently run by a staff of several part-time consultants. PCF has no overhead costs, such as an office; everyone works out of their homes on their own PCs and office equipment. The many hours spent by PCF’s caring membership (which consists of over 200 volunteers) enable the organization to raise significant funds when hospital financial problems threaten to impede further progress. Community efforts which support many satellite events not only raise significant donations, but have helped cultivate new volunteers and supporters. Unforgettable Fire has played in some of the most prestigious venues in the northeast, and their concerts have earned the reputation as one of the closest experiences to an actual live U2 concert. Members of the band, who are devoted fans of U2, strive for complete authenticity when performing their live shows and play an impressive array of U2's material, creating a true-to-form, powerful and wildly exciting concert experience for their audiences. Individual tickets are $250 and there are many opportunities for group tickets and corporate sponsorships. To purchase online, please visit http://www.pcffallevent.org/rockthecure/ or contact Nancy Joselson at 914-777-3127.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Pediatric Cancer Foundation (PCF), the 46 year-old, Mamaroneck-based nonprofit committed to fighting pediatric cancer, hosted its Rock The Cure Gala at Brae Burn Country Club in Purchase, New York on November 2nd. The evening drew more than 250 attendees and featured legendary rock music by Unforgettable Fire, a world-renowned U2 cover band. The gala raised $225,000 to support research, state of the art equipment/instruments and patient/parent care for doctors at the hospitals PCF supports. This year’s event was in memory of Paul Ulysses Jimenez, a 10-year-old Westchester County boy who passed away in January, 2016, from Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a rare form of cancer of the skeletal muscles. “Our amazing little boy taught us so much about life, about love and about strength,” remarked Paul Jimenez, Sr. in his keynote speech. “This week will mark 10 months since we have been able to kiss Paul and tell him how much we love him. I implore each and every one of you to please spread awareness for pediatric cancer research. We need to find a cure and our dream is to one day see that cure happen.” “It was an incredibly moving night,” exclaimed Bonnie Shyer, PCF president. “We listened with our hearts as Paul Jimenez spoke about his son and losing him to this horrible disease. We danced in celebration of a little boy’s life and the joy he brought to others, as well as the thousands of children and families fighting this battle. And, most importantly, we raised critical funds needed by the generosity of our steadfast supporters.” What started out as a small, local organization has now become a nationally-recognized nonprofit. With the inclusion of advanced technological equipment that the organization supports, PCF-funded doctors are in communication with hospitals both nationally as well as on an international level. PCF has grown to include support for children and their families afflicted with all types of cancer. Four decades of support has enabled the foundation to purchase state-of-the-art equipment, support research projects and bring exceptional fellows to both surgical and oncology departments across the country. County Executive Robert Astorino attended the gala, stating, “PCF started here in Westchester 46 years ago and is still going strong. Thank you for all you are doing." Noting the moving story of young Paul Jimenez's life, he went on to say, "We're here tonight to help families down the line, so that they may never have to experience something like this.” About PCF PCF’s mission is to find a cure for childhood cancer. The 501(c) (3) nonprofit raises money for research, state of the art equipment/ instruments and patient/parent care for world-renowned doctors at the hospitals PCF supports. These hospitals include: NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at NYU Langone Medical Center, Feinstein Institute of Medical Research - Northwell Health, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center and Comer Children’s Hospital, The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences. For more information about Pediatric Cancer Foundation, please visit http://www.pcfweb.org/ or contact Nancy Joselson at 914-777-3127.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Highland Ophthalmology Associates (http://www.highlandophthalmology.com), a leading eye specialty center in the Hudson Valley of New York, announced today that it is now providing a new FDA-approved procedure, Avedro Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking, to patients who suffer from Keratoconus. Keratoconus, often referred to as “KC”, is an eye condition in which the cornea weakens and thins over time, causing the development of a cone-like bulge and optical irregularity of the cornea. Though a rare condition, keratoconus typically first appears in individuals who are in their late teens or early twenties. It can result in significant visual loss and, in severe cases, may require corneal transplant surgery to help restore vision. As corneal specialists who have been involved in the care of many Keratoconus patients over the years, Dr. Mary Davidian and Dr. Julia Mathew of Highland Ophthalmology Associates are excited to be able to make use of this new technology. For patients, it offers the hope of possibly being able to avoid major corneal transplant surgery and maintain good visual acuity through implementation of this 1 hour, out-patient procedure. The corneal collagen cross-linking procedure stiffens corneas that have been weakened and, in many cases, helps halt progression of the Keratoconus disease process, allowing good vision to be maintained. The procedure involves applying numbing drops to the eye and then gently removing the surface layer of the cornea. Next, Photrexa® Viscous drops are applied to the eye over a 30-minute period. The cornea is then exposed to UV light with the use of the Avedro KXL® System for 30 minutes, while additional Photrexa® Viscous drops are applied. The patient returns home with a bandage contact lens in place to help with discomfort and is monitored by their Highland Ophthalmology eye surgeon over the next few weeks. Currently, the Avedro KXL® System with the Photrexa® Viscous drops is the first and only FDA-approved corneal collagen cross-linking treatment available in the United States. As corneal specialists, the doctors at Highland Ophthalmology are fully certified to offer this latest treatment to Keratoconus patients. For more information about corneal collagen cross-linking and Keratoconus, contact Highland Ophthalmology Associates by calling 845-562-0138 or visit http://www.highlandophthalmology.com. About Highland Ophthalmology Associates, LLC Highland Ophthalmology Associates has been providing specialty eye care services in Orange County, NY and the Greater Hudson Valley area since 1997. As a highly established eye care center, the primary goal of Highland Ophthalmology Associates is to provide patients with personalized eye care, including the latest technology in Cataract, Cornea, Dry Eye and Glaucoma treatment. We have assembled a team of some of the country’s finest ophthalmologists and optometrists, making Hudson Valley a destination for people who want the best in eye health and vision correction. The medical team of experienced, highly respected and devoted specialists is comprised of Dr. Mary Davidian, Dr. Thien (Tim) Huynh, Dr. Julia Mathew, Dr. Michael Stagner and Dr. Sharon Powell. The medical doctors of Highland Ophthalmology Associates are affiliated with leading medical and academic centers in the Hudson Valley and Greater NY Metropolitan Area, including the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, Westchester Medical Center, Central New York Eye Center and Vassar Brothers Medical Center. For more information please visit http://www.highlandophthalmology.com.


Bartley J.M.,and Hills Inc. | Olmsted R.N.,Trinity Health System | Haas J.,Westchester Medical Center
American Journal of Infection Control | Year: 2010

Infection preventionists (IP) play an increasingly important role in preventing health care-associated infection in the physical environment associated with new construction or renovation of health care facilities. The Guidelines for Design and Construction of Hospital and Healthcare Facilities, 2010, formerly known as "AIA Guidelines" was the origin of the "infection control risk assessment" now required by multiple agencies. These Guidelines represent minimum US health care standards and provide guidance on best practices. They recognize that the built environment has a profound affect on health and the natural environment and require that health care facilities be designed to "first, do no harm." This review uses the Guidelines as a blueprint for IPs' role in design and construction, updating familiar concepts to the 2010 edition with special emphasis on IP input into design given its longer range impact on health care-associated infection prevention while linking to safety and sustainability. Section I provides an overview of disease transmission risks from the built environment and related costs, section II presents a broad view of design and master planning, and section III addresses the detailed design strategies for infection prevention specifically addressed in the 2010 Facility Guidelines Institute edition. © 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.


Aronow W.S.,Westchester Medical Center
Future Cardiology | Year: 2015

Cardiac manifestations are recognized complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy is one complication that is seen in acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. It can present as transient diffuse left ventricular dysfunction or as transient regional wall motion abnormalities. It occurs more frequently with neurologically severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with increased morbidity and poor clinical outcomes. Managing this subset of patients is challenging. Early identification followed by a multidisciplinary team approach can potentially improve outcomes. © 2015 Future Medicine Ltd.


Mcclung J.A.,Westchester Medical Center
Cardiology in Review | Year: 2013

Heart failure presents its own unique challenges to the clinician who desires to make excellent and humane care near the end of life a tangible reality. Accurate prediction of mortality in the individual patient is complicated by both the frequent occurrence of sudden death, both with and without devices, and the frequently chronic course that is punctuated by recurrent and more prominent acute episodes. A significant literature demonstrates that healthcare providers continue to have difficulty communicating effectively with terminally ill patients and their caregivers regarding end-of-life care preferences, and it is clear from the prognostic uncertainty of advanced heart failure that this kind of communication, and discussions regarding palliative care, need to occur earlier rather than later. This article discusses various means of providing palliative care, and specific issues regarding device therapy, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and palliative sedation, with concurrent discussion of the ethical ramifications and pitfalls of each. A recent scientific statement from the American Heart Association begins to address some of the methodological issues involved in the care of patients with advanced heart failure. Above all, clinicians who wish to provide the highest quality of care to the dying patient need to confront the existential reality of death in themselves, their loved ones, and their patients so as to best serve those remanded to their care. Copyright © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Karadsheh Z.,Brockton Hospital | Sule S.,Westchester Medical Center
North American Journal of Medical Sciences | Year: 2013

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is currently a leading cause of antibiotic and health care-related diarrhea. The incidence and the severity of CDI-related diarrhea have increased dramatically in the USA and Europe in the past few decades. The emergence of multidrug-resistant hypervirulent strains of C. difficile has led to an increase in mortality. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) (also known as fecal bacteriotherapy) has been utilized sporadically since the 1950s; and currently, the interest in using FMT has grown again in the past few years for the treatment of CDI and other chronic gastrointestinal diseases. FMT has shown to be effective, cheap, and has very few side effects. It is believed to manipulate and restore the gut microbiota, and therefore enhances the growth of "healthy" bacteria that break the cycle of recurrent CDI. This article focus on the recent case reports on FMT, and general approach to patients undergoing this therapy. Data were obtained through a literature search via PubMed and Google.


Haas J.P.,Westchester Medical Center
American Journal of Infection Control | Year: 2012

A quick review of the basics of sample size and power is presented. Readers can participate in an online exercise that introduces them to a power calculator that can be used in their practice, and illustrates the concepts discussed in the article. © 2012 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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