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News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gives the thumbs-up as he is escorted to his car by President Donald Trump as he leaves the West Wing of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) JERUSALEM (AP) — The United Nations and the Arab League on Thursday issued a joint statement in support of the establishment of a Palestinian state, exposing a rift with President Donald Trump, who says it's up to Israel and the Palestinians to agree on the form of a final settlement. The statement came a day after Trump and the visiting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu refused to endorse the two-state solution as the preferred outcome of peace talks, abandoning what has been the cornerstone of U.S.-led peace efforts for two decades. After a meeting in Cairo, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and Arab League Chief Ahmed Aboul-Gheit said they agreed the two-state solution is "the only way to achieve comprehensive and just settlement to the Palestinian cause." The statement put them at odds with Trump, who said at a White House meeting with Netanyahu that Mideast peace does not necessarily have to include the establishment of a Palestinian state. Trump said he could accept a two-state solution or a single-state arrangement if it is agreed upon by all sides. Netanyahu also was cool to the idea of an independent Palestine, saying he did not want to deal with "labels." The Trump administration appeared to backpedal on Thursday, with U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley saying the United States absolutely supports a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and that anyone who thinks it doesn't is in "error." The Palestinians and the international community have long favored the establishment of an independent Palestinian state as the preferred way to peace in the region. Last month, days before Trump took office, representatives from dozens of countries reiterated the need for a two-state solution. In New York, the U.N.'s Mideast envoy, Nickolay Mladenov, urged "leaders on both sides to carefully contemplate the future they envision for their people." He said they would need to choose between "perpetual conflict" or "mutual respect." If Israel continues to control the occupied West Bank, the thinking goes, it will eventually have to give millions of Palestinians citizenship and voting rights, endangering the country's status as a democracy with a Jewish majority. But Netanyahu's governing coalition is dominated by hard-liners opposed to Palestinian statehood, citing the West Bank's value as a security asset and its connection to Jewish history. A new poll released Thursday showed the number of Israelis and Palestinians who support the establishment of an independent Palestinian state has dropped in recent months. But far more people continue to prefer the two-state solution to an alternative single-state arrangement. The poll found that 55 percent of Israelis and 44 percent of Palestinians support a two-state arrangement. That was down from 59 percent and 51 percent support last June. Yet just 24 percent of Israelis and one-third of Palestinians prefer a single binational state, the poll found. The EU-funded poll was conducted by the Tami Steinmetz Center for Peace Research at Tel Aviv University and the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research. It questioned over 1,200 people on each side in December and had a margin of error of 3 percentage points. Associated Press writer Maggie Michael in Cairo contributed to this report.


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

President Donald Trump walks off stage at the conclusion of a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) WASHINGTON (AP) — Though Donald Trump fashions himself a loyal boss, his inner circle has been steadily shrinking — revealing Trump's willingness to cast aside some of his most devoted advisers. This week, National Security Adviser Michael Flynn was added to the list of Trump's left-behind loyalists. He joined New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and campaign managers Corey Lewandowski and Paul Manafort. Flynn, Christie and Giuliani once made a trio of firebrands who were frequent travel companions, and all delivered incendiary speeches during the Republican National Convention last summer. But in the seven months since their primetime star turns in Cleveland, they have all been sidelined, leaving questions as to whether the influence of the conservative insurgents who helped drive Trump's winning campaign might be waning and the more orthodox GOP elements steering the West Wing on the rise. And while Trump has shown a tendency to temporarily stick with embattled true believers — such as Lewandowski, who had been arrested for assaulting a female reporter — he has eventually signed off on their exits even as he laid fault for the dismissals at the feet of others. Trump on Wednesday blamed leaks from the intelligence agencies and biased reporting from the "fake media" that led to Flynn's resignation after the national security adviser misled Vice President Mike Pence about his contact with a Russian official. "Michael Flynn, Gen. Flynn is a wonderful man," said Trump during an appearance with Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House. "I think he's been treated very, very unfairly by the media." Despite his praise for Flynn, Trump later said he himself fired the national security adviser. And just hours after Trump's blustery defense of Flynn, his administration was forced to accept the withdrawal of his choice for labor secretary, fast-food CEO Andy Puzder, amid concerns that he would have not have received Senate confirmation. The rash of exits has also threatened to change the tenor of Trump's inner circle, which at times has simmered with tensions between populist outsiders and establishment Republicans. Some close to Trump believe that the leaks that have battered the White House in recent days are born from the president's decision to turn his back on some of his loyalists. "I think that in the newest administration you should hire as many experienced capable people who are supporters of yours and who are loyal to Donald Trump from the beginning," Roger Stone, a longtime Trump adviser, said Thursday on NBC's "Today." ''The leaking that is coming out of the White House is a manifestation of the fact that there are some people who are not loyal to the president." It is hardly unusual for a president to lose key allies while making the transition from campaigning to governing, even if this may exceed the norm, said Ari Fleischer, press secretary for President George W. Bush. "Presidents lose advisers, presidents lose Cabinet picks," said Fleischer. "The key is to trust your personnel and trust your institutions to get through it." But unlike the actions of other presidents, the act of firing someone has long been central to Trump's public persona. He rocketed to national stardom on the back of the reality show "The Apprentice," which presented him in living rooms across the country as a decisive CEO, one willing to part ways with substandard employees. While promoting that show, he suggested that he actually "didn't like" to fire people. And during the campaign, he frequently touted his reluctance to fire campaign manager Lewandowski, telling a town hall crowd last spring that he was "a loyal person" and that "it would be so easy for me to terminate this man, ruin his life, ruin his family." While he held onto Lewandowski as he rolled through the Republican primaries, the celebrity businessman — or, rather, Trump's adult children and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner — did eventually fire the campaign manager once the candidate's poll numbers bogged down in the early stages of the general election. Trump, who behind the scenes has long fostered a culture of rivalry among his aides, also later moved on from his second campaign manager, Paul Manafort, in August once reporters began questioning Manafort's contacts with Russian officials. Christie, who provided a key early endorsement, was stripped of his job running the transition and he was passed over for an administration post. Giuliani, who was Trump's fiercest attack dog during the last weeks of the campaign, openly campaigned to be named secretary of state, a public play that alienated Trump, who had grown leery of the former mayor's consulting work for foreign governments and was concerned that Giuliani didn't have the gravitas of an international statesman. And while Flynn had become Trump's top adviser on national security and foreign policy matters and delivered daily intelligence briefings, revelations about his discussions with a Russian official led to a "gradual erosion of trust" with the president, according to press secretary Sean Spicer. But in Trump's world, a firing doesn't always mean goodbye. He still talks regularly to Lewandowski and Stone, with whom he had parted ways early in the campaign. Giuliani was named head of a cybersecurity task force that met at the White House last month, an apparent consolation prize. And Christie was invited to lunch at the White House earlier this week to discuss efforts to battle opioid addiction. And the departures, seemingly so unlikely seven months ago in Cleveland, may have been foreshadowed by Trump himself. "I rely on a few key people to keep me informed," he wrote in his 2004 book "How to Get Rich" to describe his management style. "They know I trust them, and they do their best to keep that trust intact." This story has been corrected to reflect that Spicer's first name is Sean.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump (all times EST): Vice Admiral Robert Harward has turned down an offer to be President Donald Trump's new national security adviser. A senior White House official says Harward turned the offer down due to financial and family commitments. The official spoke anonymously because Harward's decision has not been publicly announced. Harward would have replaced retired Gen. Michael Flynn, who resigned at Trump's request Monday after revelations that he misled Vice President Mike Pence about discussions he held with a Russian diplomat. Officials said this week that there were two other contenders: acting national security adviser Keith Kellogg, and retired Gen. David Petraeus. Mick Mulvaney has been sworn in as director of the White House budget office. Vice President Mike Pence administered the oath of office Thursday hours after the Senate confirmed Mulvaney by a narrow 51-49 vote. Democrats had opposed Mulvaney over his support for curbing the growth of Medicare and Social Security. They also objected to his brinksmanship as a freshman lawmaker during the 2011 debt crisis in which the government came perilously close to defaulting on its obligations. Mulvaney's confirmation promises to accelerate work on the Trump administration's upcoming budget plan, which is overdue. House Republicans who met Thursday with Donald Trump say the president committed to supporting the Export-Import Bank. The agency helps U.S. exporters by making and guaranteeing loans, but has been a political football on Capitol Hill due to opposition from conservatives. It was allowed to expire in 2015 but was then revived, although it still isn't able to conduct major business due to a vacancy on its board. Trump criticized the Ex-Im Bank on the campaign trail, but now appears to have warmed to it. Congressman Kevin Cramer of North Dakota says Trump "said, 'You know I wasn't a real believer until I talked to some of the job creators who use it.'" Cramer says Trump also asked for recommendations for the board. President Donald Trump has put the brakes on a regulation blocking coal mining debris from being dumped into nearby streams. Trump called the regulation a "job-killing rule" before he signed a measure to overturn it. Lawmakers from coal-mining states stood close by, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va. and Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va. Several coal miners and energy company executives also attended the White House signing ceremony. Republicans and some Democrats argued that the rule could eliminate thousands of coal-related jobs. They said the rule also ignored dozens of existing federal, state and local regulations. The Interior Department said in December when it announced the rule that 6,000 miles of streams and 52,000 acres of forests would be protected. Members of the Congressional Black Caucus are expressing bafflement and dismay after President Donald Trump asked a black reporter to set up a meeting with them. Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina says there is "an element of disrespect" in Trump's comment to journalist April Ryan. Ryan asked Trump during his press conference Thursday whether he planned to include the CBC in developing his agenda. The president responded by asking Ryan whether the CBC are "friends of yours" and remarking, "I tell you what, do you want to set up the meeting?" Clyburn says: "He's not going to ask any other reporter to do that for any other group, so why did he do that to her? I think that was pretty instructive to me." President Donald Trump says "nobody that I know of" on his campaign staff contacted Russian officials. Trump initially did not provide a straight yes or no answer on whether or not anyone on his staff had made those contacts. When pressed by reporters at a Thursday news conference, he said he wasn't aware of any. He repeatedly denied having links with Russia, a claim he deemed "fake news." Trump asked for the resignation of Michael Flynn after the national security adviser misled the vice president about his conversations with a Russian official. Flynn admitted that he discussed sanctions with the Russian ambassador to the U.S. Trump said Thursday that he did not order that conversation, but he "would have directed" him to have that conversation had he known. President Donald Trump says that "with heart" he'll deal with the policy to allow undocumented minors to stay temporarily in the U.S. The president made his comments Thursday at a White House press conference. DACA, which stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, allows young adults to get work permits and Social Security numbers and protects them from deportation. Ending DACA is part of the president's broader plan to crack down on illegal immigration, which was a cornerstone of his campaign. Trump says he'll focus his efforts on those in the country illegally who have criminal records. Trump says he needs to convince politicians that "what I am saying is right." He says he has the "best lawyers" working on the immigration policy now and the "new executive order is being tailored to the decision we got from the court." President Donald Trump says a new executive order on immigration will be tailored to the federal court decision that blocked implementation of his original order. The original order temporarily blocked travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries. It sparked protests nationwide and was put on hold by a federal court. A federal appeals court based in San Francisco last week upheld the lower court's decision. Trump has called the appellate ruling a "very bad decision" and the administration has been mulling its options since then. Trump says the new order is being tailored to satisfy the ruling from the San Francisco appeals court. He did not reveal any specifics of the new order, but says it will be issued next week. President Donald Trump says it makes sense for the U.S. to get along better with Russia because both are nuclear powers. The president said during a lengthy White House news conference that the risks of conflict with the country are enormous. Trump says, "We're a very powerful nuclear country, and so are they." He says he's been briefed on the issue and adds, "Nuclear holocaust would be like no other." Trump also says he won't forecast how he'll respond to provocations from Russia, North Korea or Iran. He says that's to maintain the element of surprise. President Donald Trump is defending the rocky rollout of his travel ban, which judges have put on hold while they weigh its legality. He calls the rollout "very smooth" and "perfect" but says it ran into "a bad court." Trump says he wanted to do the same order but have it take effect after a month or so, but he says he was advised by Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly not to do that because it would give people with bad intent time to flow into the country. He says, "That's why we did it quickly." Waiting, he says, "would have wasted a lot of time, and maybe a lot of lives." Senate Democrats are asking the White House and law enforcement agencies to preserve all materials related to contacts between Russians and individuals associated with President Donald Trump. The nine Democratic members of the Senate Judiciary Committee sent a letter Thursday to White House counsel Donald McGahn, and similar letters to the Justice Department and the FBI. The letters ask for confirmation the White House, FBI and Justice Department have instructed their employees to preserve all materials related to any contacts Trump's administration, campaign, transition team — or anyone acting on their behalf — have had with Russian government officials or its associates. President Donald Trump is staunchly denying that he has any contact or connections with Russia. Defending against accusations that he and certain members of his administration have close ties or contacts with the Russian government, Trump said, "I have nothing to do with Russia. I have no deals there. I don't know anything." He says Michael Flynn, his national security adviser who was fired this week after revelations that he discussed sanctions with a Russian diplomat, was just doing his job by contacting Russia. He says Flynn was asked to resign because he was dishonest about the details of the call with Vice President Mike Pence. But he adds, "I didn't direct him (to make the call), but I would have directed him because that was his job." President Donald Trump says his ousted national security adviser was "just doing his job." Trump is recounting why he asked Michael Flynn for his resignation. The president says at a news conference that he was "not happy" with how information about Flynn's phone call to a Russian diplomat was relayed to Vice President Mike Pence. But Trump says what Flynn did "wasn't wrong" — and after that, Trump is calling attention to what he says is "classified information that was given illegally." Trump also says he's got someone good to replace Flynn, which made the decision to let him go easier. President Donald Trump claims his administration is running like "a fine-tuned machine." But evidence points to the contrary. Trump says at a White House news conference that he turns on the TV and opens the newspapers and sees "stories of chaos." He says the truth is that "it is the exact opposite." Trump says his administration "is running like a fine-tuned machine despite the fact that I can't get my Cabinet approved." Trump's comments come amid a period of apparent dysfunction at the White House marked by leaks, division and several high-profile exits. Just this week, his top national security aide and his pick for labor secretary were ousted. —This story has been corrected to reflect in the item on Trump's comments about how his administration is running that the quote is 'the exact opposite,' not 'the exact opposition. President Donald Trump says his administration will release a new executive order on immigration next week to — in his words — "comprehensively protect our country." Trump's original order restricted immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries. It led to massive protests and was put on hold by a federal appeals court. Trump tweeted "SEE YOU IN COURT!" after that ruling. His administration said it would immediately appeal — and either revise its original executive order or write a new one. But nearly a week has gone by without action from the White House. Trump isn't saying what the new order would do. President Donald Trump says he's chosen R. Alexander Acosta to be labor secretary — a day after Trump's first nominee, fast-food executive Andrew Puzder, withdrew when he lost support among Republican senators. Trump says at a White House news conference that he believes Acosta will be "tremendous" in the Cabinet job. Acosta is dean of the Florida International University law school, has a law degree from Harvard and is a former member of the National Labor Relations Board. Puzder pulled out after it was revealed that he once employed a housekeeper who was not authorized to work in the U.S. President Donald Trump has met with one of his staunchest campaign opponents, financier Paul Singer. The president says at a news conference that Singer was at the White House on Thursday morning and is now "a very strong ally." Singer is a New York hedge fund manager who spends millions of dollars on political candidates and causes. He had been a crucial player in the "Never Trump" movement that tried to stop Trump's Republican candidacy. Here's what Trump thinks of Singer now: "He was a very strong opponent, and now he's a very strong ally." Singer has been wooing Trump since shortly after his election. Trump isn't saying what the two discussed Thursday, and a Singer representative isn't immediately replying to a request for comment. The "press is out of control." That's what President Donald Trump has said at a White House news conference. He says the "level of dishonesty is out of control," and he says he'll take his message "straight to the people." Trump's criticism of the media has grown amid reports that members of his administration had associations or communications with the Russian government. Trump says there is "distortion," but he hopes everyone can get along. But, he adds, "maybe we won't and that's OK." President Donald Trump is expected to name law school dean R. Alexander Acosta as his new choice for secretary of labor. A White House official says the announcement will come the day after Trump's original pick, Andrew Puzder, withdrew after it became clear he lacked enough Republican votes for Senate confirmation. The official isn't authorized to comment on an announcement that has not been made and spoke on condition of anonymity. Acosta has served on the National Labor Relations Board and as a federal prosecutor in Florida. Former President George W. Bush named him assistant attorney general for civil rights. Puzder withdrew on the eve of his confirmation hearing because Republicans balked at an array of personal and professional issues. Puzder said he had employed — and belatedly paid taxes on — a housekeeper not authorized to work in the United States. —This story has been corrected to reflect that the announcement has not been made. The Trump administration has asked the co-founder of a New York-based equity fund to lead a review of the intelligence community. A senior White House official says Stephen Feinberg of Cerberus Capital Management has been asked to head a review of the various intelligence agencies and make recommendations on improvements. The official was not authorized to discuss private personnel matters and spoke on condition of anonymity. The official says that Feinberg's role is not official until he completes an ethics review. President Donald Trump has been highly critical of the intelligence community amid leaks that led to revelations about associations and conversations with Russia by some senior members of his staff. Trump on Tuesday tweeted, "The real scandal here is that classified information is illegally given out by "intelligence" like candy. Very un-American!" President Donald Trump plans a news conference about midday Thursday to announce his nominee for labor secretary — "a star, great person," in his words. Trump's first pick for the job, fast food chain executive Andy Puzder, withdrew from consideration after it was revealed he employed a housekeeper who wasn't authorized to work in the U.S. Trump has blamed Senate Democrats for stalling or complicating the confirmation process of several of his Cabinet nominees. President Donald Trump is accusing Democrats of fabricating news reports about Russia because "they lost the election." The president tweeted Thursday, "The Democrats had to come up with a story as to why they lost the election, and so badly (306)," he wrote, citing the number of electoral votes he banked to win the general election. He continues, "so they made up a story - RUSSIA. Fake news!" Trump asked his national security adviser, retired Gen. Michael Flynn, to resign this week when it was revealed that Flynn had discussed sanctions with a Russian diplomat before Trump took office. U.S. intelligence agencies have also said the Russian government tampered with the presidential election in an attempt to help Trump win. A former Donald Trump associate and campaign official is blaming the bumpy start of the billionaire's presidency on mixed loyalties in the White House. Roger Stone declined to name names in an appearance on NBC's "Today" show Thursday, but he discussed "a division between those who are loyal to the president and those who are loyal to the Republican National Committee." When asked if he was referring to Reince Priebus (ryns PREE'-bus), who headed the RNC before joining Trump's team and becoming chief of staff in the West Wing, Stone demurred, indicating he didn't want to say who he was talking about. Stone says, "The leaking that is coming out of the White House is a manifestation of the fact" that some of the people Trump hired "are not loyal." He adds, "I think it's healthier to have people in the administration who share the president's vision of where he wants to take the country." President Donald Trump is warning "low-life leakers" of classified information that they will be caught. In a pair of tweets Thursday, Trump says, "Leaking, and even illegal classified leaking, has been a big problem in Washington for years. Failing @nytimes (and others) must apologize!" Trump writes, "the spotlight has finally been put on the low-life leakers! They will be caught!" Trump's national security adviser, retired Gen. Michael Flynn, resigned at Trump's urging this week after a series of reports revealed Flynn held addressed the issue of sanctions with a Russian diplomat before Trump was in office. On Wednesday, Trump said it was "really a sad thing that he was treated so badly." He tweeted Wednesday that "classified information is illegally given out by 'intelligence' like candy. Very un-American!"


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives. I've been getting the impression for some time now that Donald Trump really, really doesn't like the media. This is odd, as he's always seemed to enjoy appearing on TV and in the press. He's also said to watch cable news and read east coast papers with considerable commitment. Still, having accused CNN of being so-called "fake news" at Thursday's solo press conference, you'd think his feelings were crystal clear. Yet no. On Friday, he was compelled to tweet something even more specific: "The FAKE NEWS media (failing @nytimes, @NBCNews, @ABC, @CBS, @CNN) is not my enemy, it is the enemy of the American People!" That does seem a touch harsh. Leaving out The Washington Post, I mean. He has directed his ire at that publication previously. Does this mean it's "improved" in some way? On Twitter, though, some focused on the term "enemy of the people." They felt it touched on the notion that the media was somehow traitorous and that the First Amendment may not be all that. This, for example, from David Cicilline: "This is usually one of the first things authoritarian leaders do. Attack the media's credibility." "Vilify media: check. Discredit intelligence: check. Establish dictatorship: still working on it," suggested Twitter user Gilskee. Presidential historian Michael Beschloss offered an echo of times past: "On December 1972 tape, Nixon told Kissinger, 'The press is the enemy, the establishment is the enemy, the professors are the enemy.' Trump had initially only included the Times, CNN and NBC News in his original version of this tweet (see below) and garlanded its ending with "SICK!". But he deleted that, added ABC and CBS and removed the "SICK!" before tweeting it out again (Disclosure: CBS is CNET's parent company). The president does sometimes seem to use Twitter in reaction to something he's seen or read. In the media, that is. Those of caustic personality might suggest that one line from a report on Thursday of his press conference might have stung him into action: "For days, a frustrated and simmering president fumed inside the West Wing residence about what aides said he saw as his staff's inadequate defense and the ineffectiveness of his own tweets." The publication? Why, The New York Times.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Zuletzt erschien Rob Lowe im Jahr 2001 in einer SKECHERS-Kampagne, wo er zusammen mit seinem Schauspielerkollegen aus der „Brat Pack“-Ära, Robert Downey Jr. und Matt Dillon, in einer Anzeigenserie zu sehen war. Nachdem er durch seine Mitwirkung in The Outsiders und St. Elmo’s Fire allgemeine Bekanntheit erlangt hatte, zog sich Lowes Karriere durch Genre und Medien. Besonderes Lob erhielt er für seine Darstellung von Sam Seaborn in The West Wing und in neueren Rollen in Behind the Candelabra und The Grinder. Im Herbst 2016 stieß er zu dem Team von CBS für die zweite Staffel der Drama-Serie Code Black. SKECHERS USA, Inc. (NYSE:SKX) mit Sitz in Manhattan Beach, Kalifornien, entwirft, entwickelt und vermarktet eine breite Palette von Lifestyle-Schuhen für Männer, Frauen und Kinder sowie Performance-Schuhe für Männer und Frauen. Schuhmode von SKECHERS ist in den USA und in über 160 Ländern und Territorien weltweit in Kaufhäusern und Spezialgeschäften, in mehr als 2.012 SKECHERS-Einzelhandelsgeschäften, im sonstigen Einzelhandel und über die E-Commerce-Website des Unternehmens erhältlich. Das Unternehmen führt sein internationales Geschäft über ein Netzwerk von globalen Vertriebspartnern, über Joint-Venture-Partner in Asien und dem Nahen und Mittleren Osten sowie über hundertprozentige Tochtergesellschaften in Kanada, Japan, Europa und Lateinamerika. Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf skechers.com. Folgen Sie uns auf Facebook (facebook.com/SKECHERS) und Twitter (twitter.com/SKECHERSUSA). Diese Pressemitteilung enthält zukunftsgerichtete Aussagen im Sinne der „Safe Harbor“-Bestimmungen des Private Securities Litigation Reform Act von 1995. Zu diesen zukunftsgerichteten Aussagen gehören unter anderem solche über das inländische und internationale Wachstum des Unternehmens in der Zukunft, Finanzergebnisse und Geschäfte einschließlich des erwarteten Nettoumsatzes und erwarteter Einnahmen, die Entwicklung neuer Produkte durch das Unternehmen, die zukünftige Nachfrage nach den Produkten, das geplante inländische und internationale Wachstum des Unternehmens, das Eröffnen neuer Geschäfte sowie Werbe- und Marketinginitiativen. Zukunftsgerichtete Aussagen lassen sich an der Verwendung zukunftsgerichteter Ausdrücke wie „annehmen“, „davon ausgehen“ „erwarten“, „schätzen“, „beabsichtigen“, „vorhaben“, „planen“, „wird sein“, „wird weiterhin“, „wird dazu führen“, „könnte“, „kann“, „dürfte“ oder jeder Variation dieser Begriffe mit ähnlicher Bedeutung erkennen. Derartige Aussagen unterliegen Risiken und Ungewissheiten, die dazu führen können, dass die tatsächlichen Ergebnisse wesentlich von den in zukunftsgerichteten Aussagen prognostizierten abweichen. Zu den Faktoren, die zu diesen Unterschieden führen oder beitragen könnten, zählen internationale wirtschaftliche, politische und Marktbedingungen wie die Ungewissheit über die nachhaltige konjunkturelle Erholung in Europa; das Halten, Steuern und Prognostizieren von Kosten und korrekten Lagerbeständen; der Verlust wichtiger Kunden; ein Sinken der Nachfrage von Brancheneinzelhändlern und die Stornierung von Aufträgen aufgrund zu geringer Beliebtheit bestimmter Designs und/oder Produktkategorien; die Aufrechterhaltung des Markenimages und ein intensiver Wettbewerb bei Endkundenschuhverkäufern, insbesondere in dem hart umkämpften Performanceschuh-Markt; die Vorauskalkulation, Erkennung, Interpretation oder Prognose von Veränderungen bei den Modetrends, der Verbrauchernachfrage nach diesen Produkten und den verschiedenen oben beschriebenen Marktfaktoren; die Verkaufszahlen während der Frühjahrs-, Schulanfangs- und Ferien-Verkaufssaison sowie weitere Faktoren, auf die im Jahresabschlussbericht des Unternehmens auf Formblatt 10-K für das am 31. Dezember 2015 zu Ende gegangene Jahr und in dessen Quartalabschlussbericht auf Formblatt 10-Q für das zum 30. September 2016 zu Ende gegangene Quartal Bezug genommen wird. Die Liste der genannten Risiken erhebt keinen Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit. Das Unternehmen operiert in einem sehr wettbewerbsintensiven und sich schnell verändernden Umfeld. Manchmal entstehen neue Risiken und die Unternehmen können nicht alle solchen Risikofaktoren vorhersehen. Auch ist es für die Unternehmen unmöglich, den Einfluss jedes dieser Risikofaktoren auf ihre Geschäftstätigkeit oder das Ausmaß des Einflusses eines Faktors oder einer Kombination von Faktoren auf eine Abweichung der tatsächlichen Ergebnisse von den in einer zukunftsgerichteten Aussage enthaltenen Ergebnissen vorherzusehen. Angesichts dieser Risiken und Ungewissheiten sollten Sie sich nicht zu sehr auf zukunftsgerichtete Aussagen als Prognose tatsächlicher Ergebnisse verlassen. Außerdem sollten die ausgewiesenen Ergebnisse nicht als Hinweise auf zukünftige Ergebnisse betrachtet werden.


Protest signs in cities around the country are calling for the impeachment of the president — just not the one you think. “Impeach President Bannon” posters were spotted in Washington, New York City and several other major cities on Sunday, part of a Presidents’ Day weekend demonstration against President Trump’s controversial White House chief strategist and senior adviser, Steve Bannon. “No one voted for Steve Bannon,” the California-based organizers of the protest wrote in an email to Yahoo News. “Yet he is the de-facto 45th president of the United States.” The group raised more than $8,000 online for the signs, which list Presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama before Bannon’s name. “Thanks for helping us show this arrogant ‘mastermind’ that he’s not as smart as he thinks he is,” Alison Kay, one of the protest’s principal organizers, wrote. “If Bannon thinks Trump is a ‘blunt instrument’ … wait till he sees what we can do.” Bannon, the former chairman of Breitbart News and chief executive of Trump’s presidential campaign, has been satirically portrayed as Satan and the Grim Reaper on late-night television following his appointment to his outsized role in the West Wing. “Darkness is good,” Bannon told the Hollywood Reporter in mid-November. “That’s power.” In an interview with the New York Times following the inauguration, Bannon infamously called the media “the opposition party.” “The media should be embarrassed and humiliated and keep its mouth shut,” he said. In late January, Trump signed an executive memorandum reorganizing the National Security Council and elevating Bannon to its principals committee. Earlier this month, Bannon landed on the cover of Time magazine. Its headline: “The Great Manipulator.” The “Impeach President Bannon” project is just the latest protest against Bannon, who at Breitbart championed the so-called alt-right movement that critics have said is a rebranding of white nationalism. Bannon’s choice as chief strategist drew immediate opposition from Democratic lawmakers like Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, as well as the Anti-Defamation League and other civil rights groups calling on Trump to rescind his appointment. “This country, since our inception, has struggled to overcome discrimination of all forms: racism, sexism, xenophobia, and homophobia,” Sanders said in a speech in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 16. “Over the years, we have made progress in becoming a less discriminatory and more tolerant society — and we are not going backward. The appointment by President-elect Trump of a racist individual like Mr. Bannon to a position of authority is totally unacceptable.”


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Rob Lowe is back in SKECHERS after a fifteen-year hiatus! The footwear Company today announced that the legendary film and television actor will return to the brand for a new SKECHERS men’s footwear marketing campaign set to launch in Spring 2017. “Rob helped us introduce our dress casual collection to the world in 2001 and today his appeal crosses the many generations who wear our footwear—so he was a perfect fit then and he makes perfect sense for SKECHERS again now,” said Michael Greenberg, president of SKECHERS. “Rob is extremely talented and loved by fans everywhere, so it’s a thrill to be working with him again. We know he’ll be a great face for our comfortable and stylish men’s footwear collections—and amazingly it’s like he hasn’t aged a day since his initial SKECHERS campaign!” “It seems like yesterday when I first posed for a photographer wearing SKECHERS. They were good looking shoes then, but I don’t remember them being so comfortable,” added Rob Lowe. “We have a really fun concept about how comfort fits into my day that I think people will love, and it’s exciting that we’re now doing something bigger with a full global campaign that includes a television commercial.” Mr. Lowe last appeared in a SKECHERS campaign in 2001 as part of a series of print ads that also featured fellow “brat pack” era actors Robert Downey Jr. and Matt Dillon. After becoming a household name following appearances in The Outsiders and St. Elmo’s Fire, Lowe’s career has crossed genres and mediums with special acclaim for his portrayal of Sam Seaborn on The West Wing as well as more recent roles in Behind the Candelabra and The Grinder. In Fall 2016, he joined the cast of CBS’ drama series Code Black for its second season. Current SKECHERS men’s campaigns feature Joe Montana, Howie Long and Sugar Ray Leonard. And previous endorsees have included iconic drummer Ringo Starr and sports stars Joe Namath, Tommy Lasorda, Mariano Rivera, Pete Rose, Mark Cuban, Karl Malone, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Rick Fox and Wayne Gretzky. SKECHERS lifestyle footwear collections for men span a wide array of trend-right casual and sport styles featuring innovations such as SKECHERS Air-Cooled Memory Foam for long-lasting comfort. Styles from the SKECHERS men’s collection are available in SKECHERS retail stores as well as department stores and footwear retailers around the globe. SKECHERS USA, Inc. (NYSE:SKX), based in Manhattan Beach, California, designs, develops and markets a diverse range of lifestyle footwear for men, women and children, as well as performance footwear for men and women. SKECHERS footwear is available in the United States and over 160 countries and territories worldwide via department and specialty stores, more than 2,012 SKECHERS Company-owned and third-party-owned retail stores, and the Company’s e-commerce websites. The Company manages its international business through a network of global distributors, joint venture partners in Asia and the Middle East, and wholly-owned subsidiaries in Canada, Japan, throughout Europe and Latin America. For more information, please visit skechers.com and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/SKECHERS) and Twitter (twitter.com/SKECHERSUSA). This announcement contains forward-looking statements that are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements include, without limitation, the Company’s future domestic and international growth, financial results and operations including expected net sales and earnings, its development of new products, future demand for its products, its planned domestic and international expansion and opening of new stores and advertising and marketing initiatives. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking language such as “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “will be,” “will continue,” “will result,” “could,” “may,” “might,” or any variations of such words with similar meanings. Any such statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause or contribute to such differences include international economic, political and market conditions including the uncertainty of sustained recovery in Europe; sustaining, managing and forecasting costs and proper inventory levels; losing any significant customers; decreased demand by industry retailers and cancellation of order commitments due to the lack of popularity of particular designs and/or categories of products; maintaining brand image and intense competition among sellers of footwear for consumers, especially in the highly competitive performance footwear market; anticipating, identifying, interpreting or forecasting changes in fashion trends, consumer demand for the products and the various market factors described above; sales levels during the spring, back-to-school and holiday selling seasons; and other factors referenced or incorporated by reference in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015 and its quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the three months ended September 30, 2016. The risks included here are not exhaustive. The Company operates in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks emerge from time to time and the companies cannot predict all such risk factors, nor can the companies assess the impact of all such risk factors on their respective businesses or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. Given these risks and uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements as a prediction of actual results. Moreover, reported results should not be considered an indication of future performance.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

WASHINGTON — Sitting in a small office in the West Wing last Friday, White House senior national security staffer Michael Anton lamented that he wants to remain behind the scenes. “I don’t want to be famous,” Anton said, his expression dripping with contempt. However, in the first three weeks of President Trump’s administration, Anton’s presence in the White House has already garnered a significant amount of interest. And Anton is likely to get even more attention in the wake of the sudden resignation of Trump’s national security adviser, Michael Flynn. Anton has been working as something of a one-man band in the White House handling communications for national security matters. One White House source described Anton as an “invaluable” member of the small national security team that just lost its chief and is now in the midst of intense scrutiny. “The spotlight is definitely on this office,” Anton said in a phone call Wednesday night. Though he’s highly visible and widely seen as something of an intellectual godfather to Trump’s ideology, Anton says he has a fairly limited role in the White House. According to him, his day-to-day business involves managing national security press and some input on speechwriting. And Anton’s official work is far from the only thing worth talking to him about. He’s a Renaissance man who has developed a following as an expert on bespoke menswear. From 2009-2010, Anton told Yahoo News, he worked in the kitchen of L’Ecole, a now defunct Michelin-recommended French restaurant in Manhattan that was operated by the International Culinary Center cooking school. He has 600 bottles of wine in his personal collection and makes meals at home with Japanese chef’s knives that he sharpens by hand. Michael Anton is the most interesting man in the White House. He has previously worked for some of the biggest names in conservative politics. Anton served as a special assistant for national security affairs for President George W. Bush, was a deputy foreign policy adviser on former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s 2008 presidential campaign and worked as a speechwriter for Fox News media mogul Rupert Murdoch. Anton says he was introduced into the orbit of Trump’s Oval Office by “a number of people,” including Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel. On Feb. 2, the Weekly Standard outed Anton as the man who published a series of essays under the pseudonym Publius Decius Mus during the presidential campaign. These pieces of writing drew upon Anton’s experience analyzing political philosophy in peer-reviewed journals and, even before his identity was known, made him stand out as one of the few authors making an intellectual argument for Trump. Some consider him a key architect of the emerging ideology of Trump. Anton even claims credit for coining the term “Trumpism.” Although there are other, earlier citations, he certainly popularized and helped define it. Surprisingly, the man dubbed as author of the “source code” for the administration hails from the liberal stronghold of Northern California. Despite his Golden State roots, Anton has an academic lineage that traces back to the founder of the conservative movement, Barry Goldwater. Anton boasts a pair of master’s degrees, including one in political science from the Claremont Graduate University. At that school, Anton says the late Harry Jaffa became his “great teacher.” Jaffa was an adviser on Goldwater’s 1964 presidential campaign and crafted a pair of lines that led to the candidate being defined as a firebrand: “I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.” Jaffa was a student of the professor Leo Strauss and, after his mentor’s death, he became the founding figure of the school of thought known in academic circles as West Coast Straussianism. Anton has credited Jaffa with teaching him the Straussian method and ideals, which involve close reading of the landmark texts in political philosophy and a strong belief in patriotic pride and American exceptionalism. Anton describes his personal view of government as being interchangeable with the West Cost Straussian school. He characterizes it as a philosophy where the founding fathers and President Abraham Lincoln are revered for having crafted an almost ideal government that acknowledged a “fixed human nature and moral order.” Anton points to what he describes as Lincoln’s view of “the centrality of the Declaration of Independence to properly interpreting the Constitution.” For the Straussians, Anton says this means the founders created a perfect framework that was updated based on an understanding of the moral code embedded in the original documents, and Straussianism argues that lawmakers should all be following a universal idea of morality. It’s a philosophy that critics call “authoritarian.” “The good is higher than and supercedes the law,” Anton explained. “A wise legislator makes the law with an eye to the good.” Armed with these Straussian tools, as “Decius,” Anton crafted an eloquent ideology to undergird Trump’s punchy slogans, “America First” and “Make America Great Again.” “I don’t think Trump is a perfect representation of West Coast Straussianism, but I think official conservatism got so far from certain core tenets of the founders, and Lincoln’s vision, and the ancients’ vision for that matter, and Trump came along and was a really bracing and kind of exhilarating corrective to that,” said Anton. Anton points to trade and immigration as areas where mainstream conservatives strayed and Trump is righting the ship. As his teacher once did for Goldwater, Anton articulated justifications for some of the more extreme elements of Trump’s platform. The Decius essays Anton published during the campaign argued that America is facing an existential threat from moral degradation of its core traditional values and from the detrimental cultural and economic effects of unrestricted immigration. Decius cast the election as a choice between Trump’s desire to restrict immigration and certain doom. He argued that Islam is “incompatible with the modern West” and suggested Trump was right to call for blocking migrants from the Middle East even though “America’s ruling and intellectual classes” believe in what he described as “the sacredness of mass immigration.” For Anton, “orthodox Islam’s” conflict with the values of Western society is a point of fact. He argues that, historically, “in orthodox Islam it does not recognize any distinction between civil and religious law, or as we would put it, separation of church and state.” “That is incompatible with Western modernity, period, end of story. I’m not saying that no individual Muslim can accept the distinction between the civil and the religious law. I’m just saying that the faith itself does not accept that fact,” Anton said. In his Decius essays, Anton also railed against what he dubbed “politically correct McCarthyism,” which he implied involved vicious attacks on people who challenged “inanities like 32 ‘genders,’ elective bathrooms, single-payer, Iran sycophancy, ‘Islamophobia’ and Black Lives Matter.” Disdain for the politically correct is baked into Anton’s philosophy. Anton says  West Coast Straussians blame progressive academics for committing an original sin of demonizing the founders because of the fact they permitted slavery even though it was blatantly a contradiction of the premise that “all men are created equal.” His defends the founding fathers by saying it would not have been politically feasible for them to abolish slavery at the dawn of the nation. In Anton’s view, they set the course for ending slavery through the moral concepts in the founding documents. Perhaps most controversially, as Decius, Anton attempted to flank attacks against Trump’s sloganeering by arguing that the America First Committee was “unfairly maligned.” That group, which was founded in 1940 to oppose U.S. involvement in World War II, has long been associated with anti-Semitism. This rejection of multiculturalism, criticism of Islam, opposition to immigration and support for the America First Committee led some critics to dub Anton a white nationalist and suggest he had “embraced an anti-Semitic past.” Anton vehemently denied those charges in an interview published on Sunday by American Greatness, a website where he served as an editor until last month. In that conversation, Anton acknowledged that “a lot of anti-Semites supported” the America First Committee but disputed that “the group was anti-Semitic and anyone who says anything good about it is an anti-Semite.” Anton pointed to his admiration for Strauss and Jaffa, who were both Jewish, as evidence he couldn’t possibly be anti-Semitic. He also said it was a “lie/smear” to label him a “white nationalist.” “If I am a nationalist, I am an American nationalist. I am also an American patriot, and I don’t see the difference,” said Anton. At one point during his conversation with Yahoo News, Anton interrupted one of his discourses on political philosophy to ask a question. “Could I just ask you bluntly, are you going to, like, repeat any of this bullshit that I’m a white nationalist and anti-Semite?” To say he’s frustrated with some of the recent coverage would be an understatement. He also points to his Greek, Italian and Lebanese ancestry as evidence those charges are ridiculous. “According to the actual white nationalists, they would say I’m not even white because I’m Lebanese,“ Anton said. Anton goes by many names, and Publius Decius Mus is just one of his alter egos. Under the pen name “Nicholas Antongiavanni,” he published “The Suit,” a manual on “how to dress with style, flair, and an eye toward gaining power.” In a Straussian twist, Anton’s book was written in a painstaking copy of the structure of Niccolò Machiavelli’s handbook for ruthless politicians, “The Prince,” and his nom de plume was also a nod to the Italian author. But Anton may have composed the bulk of his writing on fashion and cuisine as Manton, the alias he used on the website Styleforum, where he wrote over 40,000 posts from 2002 until the day after Trump’s inauguration last month. In his forum postings, Anton discussed his tastes for the finer things in life, including hand-tailored suits, his vast stores of wine and his cooking techniques. Standing well over 6 feet, dressed in impeccable three-piece suits, and sporting fashionable eyeglasses, Anton cuts an elegant figure in the West Wing. He is soft-spoken, but his words come out with precision and — when he is speaking to the press — sometimes an obvious sense of exasperation. Yet he has given multiple interviews about his fondness for bespoke menswear and, through his books and forum postings, has become a well-known fixture in the world of “Dandyism,” a subculture of men dedicated to dressing well. In a 2008 interview with Humanities magazine, Anton discussed whether or not he sees himself as a “Dandy,” which he indicated was a term of the “highest praise” in his book. “I have a regular job and a suburban home and all that, but I overdress. I aspire to be a dandy in that sense only,” Anton said. Now, Anton said, he doesn’t “really” consider himself a dandy since he’s “toned down” his look. “I don’t know that I ever wore flashy clothes, but they used to be a bit flashier than they are now.” In his forum posts as Manton, he describes stockpiling bolts of fabric and commissioning suits from world-renowned tailors. Anton also reviewed other posters’ ensembles and gave his assessments of the skill level of various suit makers. However, his message board activity wasn’t all about style. As Manton he challenged politically correct sensibilities just as he did in his campaign writings. On Nov. 14, 2014, Anton spent hours arguing with fellow Styleforum members about the phrase “tar baby” in a thread that was initially about the work of the Italian tailor Gennaro Paone. While the term is considered by some to be a slur against African-Americans, its original usage was as a metaphor for an inextricable problem. The phrase was popularized in the Uncle Remus stories, a collection of folklore gathered from Southern slave plantations. After a Styleforum poster was criticized for saying “tar baby” in a post, Anton leaped in to defend. He pointed to the word’s origins: “The origin of ‘Tar-Baby’ is the Uncle Remus stories, published in the US in 1881. It is a doll made of tar that sticks to Br’er Rabbit and the more he fights it to get free, the more he gets entangled. It is a metaphor for ‘intractable problem’ and was meant with no racial connotations whatsoever,” Anton wrote. Anton went on to argue the fact the term now has “racial connotations” is due to efforts by liberals to shame white Americans. He accused another forum member of participating in this scheme to “guilt trip” white Americans who are proud of their culture. “It has acquired some, mostly at the hands of the left who like to troll through all of American history and literature looking for things to get outraged over and use as clubs to beat white Americans who self identify as ‘American’ to guilt trip us into being ashamed of our country, our culture and to arm Social Justice Warriors like you who derive satisfaction from white-on-white status games,” Anton wrote. As the debate raged on, Anton connected it to the attempts to censor Mark Twain’s 1884 novel “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” because it featured racial slurs that were commonplace at the time it was written. He suggested that the forum members unhappy with the use of “tar baby” would like to see “trigger warnings on posts” and might attack people who enjoyed Twain’s book or used words that could be seen as offensive if taken out of context. “Let’s put trigger warnings on posts. Or better yet, word filters. I read Huck Finn. I liked it. Twain uses the N word. I am a bad person! I once said ‘niggardly’ to mean ‘cheapskate.’ Gulag! I ordered a Negro Modelo at a taco stand. Racist!” wrote Anton. When another forum member pointed out that the Uncle Remus stories are “full of racially charged symbolism” and are now seen as offensive by some modern audiences, Anton accused them of “blabbering” and attempting to assert their superiority by flaunting “sensitivity.” He then posted a rant in mostly capital letters where he mockingly linked the offense over the phrase “tar baby” to the Black Lives Matter movement and outrage over the deaths of young African-Americans who were killed by police officers. “I also need to add, of course, that THIS IS THE MOST PRESSING ISSUE IN AMERICA!!!!! MICHAEL BROWN!!!! TRAYVON!!!!! BLACK BODIES DYING IN THE STREETS!!!!! BECAUSE SOMEONE SAID ‘TAR BABY’ WE KNOW HOW RACIST AMERICA IS!!!! THAT’S WHY THEY DIED!!!!!!” Anton wrote. After a forum user responded by asking Anton “WTF is your problem,” he responded by expressing frustration with political correctness, or as he put it, “officious little busybodies wagging their fingers in our faces and telling us what we can and cannot say.” His post was embedded with links to a pair of T-shirts, including one that said, “I’d rather be lynching.” “I am tired of the Social Justice Warriors who troll the Internet looking for things to get offended over,” Anton wrote, adding, “I am tired of the default assumption being that all of American life is ‘racist’ and we all need constantly to walk on eggshells because America is so deeply compromised that one out of place word will launch the next lynching.” Yahoo News asked Anton about the forum argument in the West Wing last Friday. Anton pointed out that in 2006, President George W. Bush’s press secretary, Tony Snow, was attacked for using the term “tar baby” as he described his desire to avoid trying to comment on controversial government surveillance programs. “He didn’t apologize for it, either,” Anton said of Snow, adding, “I’m not going to.” It’s clear Anton is frustrated with what he sees as excessive political correctness. “And so is the president,” Anton pointed out. Anton also discussed his frustrations with illegal immigration on Styleforum. In a February 2015 post, he railed against the supposed veneration of undocumented immigrants while saying they regularly bothered him at his home. “I realize that illegal aliens are sanctified beings who can do no wrong, and about whom it is blasphemy to say anything negative, but how’s about if they stop coming and ringing my doorbell incessantly at 6:15 am every time it snows?” Anton asked, adding, “No, I don’t want you to shovel my walk, I will take care of it. Go away and don’t disturb my family. In America, we tend to sleep until at least 7 am on weekends.” Another forum member asked Anton how he knew the people trying to shovel his walk were undocumented immigrants. “Did you ask for their papers?” the forum member asked. “No, I used prosecutorial discretion and let them go,” Anton said. “Better yet, I taxed the rest of the street and gave them money for doing nothing. Except breaking the law in the first place.” Despite these political discussions, the vast majority of the Manton forum postings that Yahoo News was able to review dealt with style. In fact, Anton’s book and Internet presence helped earn him renown in the “Dandy” community. In 2008, the website “Dandyism.net” cited Anton’s forum postings and said his “obsession with precise measurements led us to dub him ‘the quarter-inch dandy.’” In his book, he assessed the fashion choices of past presidents and even jokingly suggested this contributed to their success or failure. So what does the White House’s resident dandy think of the president’s look? Trump’s penchant for unbuttoned suits and lengthy ties, and his trademark comb-over have been widely panned by style mavens. However, in his conversation with Yahoo News, Anton suggested Trump has done well by adopting a consistent look he feels good in. “I think he has a style that he’s very confident with that’s very much his own and that works for him,” Anton said of the president. “When you find what works with you, you should stick with it.” Anton, who was clad in an impeccable three-piece navy suit, noted that Trump favors “solid Roman tailoring.” He also pointed out that Trump almost always wears white dress shirts and solid-colored satin ties. “Is he ever not in a white shirt?” Anton asked. Photos show that Trump manages to keep his ties hanging unusually low by affixing a piece of Scotch tape to hold the short end in place, a fashion faux pas the men’s style bible Esquire described as simply “embarrassing.” Anton said he was unaware of Trump’s tie taping. “I did not know that,” Anton said with a laugh when Yahoo asked about Tapegate. Anton was less diplomatic when he was asked about the rest of Washington’s political class. He said too many rely on what he dubbed the “assistant secretary tie” in his book. “It’s a sort of D.C. staple. It’s not as common as it used to be,” Anton explained. “It’s that sort of striped tie, alternating red, silver, blue. It’s actually a Brooks Brothers pattern. Everybody has that tie.” Ditching that clichéd tie is Anton’s main sartorial advice for his fellow politicos. “I would say to people, move beyond that,” Anton said with a laugh.


News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this April 27, 2016 file photo, Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr. testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Dunford said Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, a Pentagon-led review of strategy for defeating the Islamic State group will present President Donald Trump with options not just to speed up the fight against IS but also to combat al-Qaida and other extremist groups beyond Iraq and Syria. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File) WASHINGTON (AP) — In a White House laden with competing power centers, a trio of military men has emerged as a force to be reckoned with. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly and Joint Chiefs Chairman Joseph Dunford have quickly formed a stabilizing alliance in an administration whose earliest days have been marked by turmoil. At working dinners and meetings with President Donald Trump, the men — all retired or current generals —have sought to guide the new leader and foreign policy novice. And they have increasingly represented Trump around the world, seeking to allay concerns about the new president and his nascent foreign policy. Their fingerprints can increasingly be seen on the president's early national security moves, from the reworking of his controversial refugee and immigration order to the walking back of his talk of a "military operation" for deportations to his search for a national security adviser after the first was ousted. All three are notable for their independence from Trump. None had a prior relationship with him but all have long histories with each other. When Kelly's son was killed in Afghanistan in 2010, it was Dunford who arrived at his house in uniform to inform him. Mattis and Kelly recommended each other for defense secretary. All three served in Iraq around the same time. In Washington and in foreign capitals, their long resumes have been a welcome addition to an administration led by a president and several advisers with no experience in government. "It should be reassuring that they are visible with Trump and cementing their influence," said Christine Wormuth, a former undersecretary of defense for policy and a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington-based think tank. The rising power of Mattis, Kelly and Dunford also could assuage some fears among Republicans that national security decision-making is becoming too concentrated in the White House West Wing. Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, has been deeply involved in discussions with foreign officials. And chief strategist Steve Bannon, a media executive with no foreign policy experience, now has a seat on Trump's Principals Committee, which weighs pressing national security issues. Of the three military men, Mattis has emerged as a dominant figure in Trump's orbit. A 66-year-old retired Marine, Mattis is credited by some National Security Council staff with blocking an executive order that would have reopened CIA "black sites." Trump has said the Pentagon chief convinced him it wasn't necessary to bring back banned torture techniques like waterboarding. On his way to Baghdad this week, Mattis bluntly rebuffed Trump's assertion that America may have a second chance to take Iraqi oil as compensation for U.S. efforts in the war-torn country. "We're not in Iraq to seize anybody's oil," Mattis told reporters. Kelly, too, has tried to moderate some of the president's hard-line positions. Hours after Trump said deportations of people in the U.S. illegally were being carried out as a "military operation," Kelly said Thursday in Mexico that the U.S. would not enlist the military to enforce immigration laws. White House spokesman Sean Spicer later said Trump was describing the "precision" of the operations and not referring to the military actually being involved. Mattis and Kelly are said to have been deeply frustrated with the rollout of Trump's refugee and immigration ban and made clear to associates that they were not involved in crafting the directive. Both moved swiftly to address gaps in the measure, with Mattis asking that Iraqis who helped U.S. troops be exempt and Kelly clarifying that green card holders would not be affected. For the first few weeks after the inauguration, Mattis and Kelly agreed that one of them should remain in the United States to keep tabs on the orders rapidly firing out of the White House, according to a person familiar with the discussions. Despite their concerns about Trump's travel order, neither has spoken out against it. In fact, Kelly launched a particularly robust defense of it, which was welcomed by the White House, an administration official said. The official and others with knowledge of the emerging dynamic insisted on anonymity in order to discuss the administration's internal dynamics.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is giving himself too much credit for sending criminal foreigners out of the country and saving money on fighter planes. He's getting too much credit from one of the few women with a top White House job for elevating women in the administration. A look at some statements Thursday by Trump and presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway: TRUMP: "We're getting gang members out, we're getting drug lords out, we're getting really bad dudes out of this country, at a rate nobody has ever seen before. ... It's a military operation because what has been allowed to come into our country, when you see gang violence that you've read about like never before and all of the things, much of that is people who are here illegally. And they're rough and they're tough, but they're not tough like our people. So we're getting them out." THE FACTS: Trump is broadly embellishing his brief track record on immigration and wrongly branding the deportation effort a military operation. The number of people expelled from the country since Trump took office Jan. 20 has not been released. No available data supports his claim that immigrants in the country illegally are being expelled at a rate "nobody has ever seen before." Deportations were brisk when Barack Obama was president. Altogether in January, 16,643 people were deported, a drop from December (20,395) but a number that is similar to monthly deportations in early 2015 and 2016. This month, Homeland Security officials have said 680 people were arrested in a weeklong effort to find and arrest criminal immigrants living in the United States illegally. Three-quarters of those people had been convicted of crimes, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said. The remaining 25 percent were not. The government has not provided information about who was arrested in that roundup, so it's impossible to determine how many gang members or drug lords were in that group. That effort was largely planned before Trump took office and was alternately described by the administration as a routine enforcement effort and a signal of Trump's pledge to take a harder line on illegal immigration. During the Obama administration similar operations were carried out that yielded thousands of arrests. The 680 arrests were not carried out in a military operation. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, responsible for finding and deporting immigrants in the country illegally, is a civilian law enforcement agency. Trump plans to increase enforcement, but Kelly contradicted him Thursday over the nature of that initiative: "There will be no use of military forces in immigration," Kelly said while visiting Mexico. "There will be no — repeat, no — mass deportations." TRUMP, at a White House meeting with manufacturers, again claimed credit for a $700 million savings in the military's contract with Lockheed for the F-35 fighter jet. Speaking to the defense contractor's CEO Marillyn Hewson, he said: "Over $700 million. Do you think Hillary would have cost you $700 million? I assume you wanted her to win." THE FACTS: Cost savings for the F-35 began before Trump's inauguration and predate his complaints about the price tag. The head of the Air Force program announced significant price reductions Dec. 19 — after Trump had tweeted about the cost but weeks before Trump met about the issue on Jan. 13 with Hewson. "There is absolutely no evidence whatsoever of additional F-35 cost savings as a result of President Trump's intervention," said Richard Aboulafia, an analyst with the aerospace consulting firm Teal Group. He said Trump appears to be taking credit for prior-year budget decisions and for work already done by managers at the Pentagon who took action before the presidential election to reduce costs. CONWAY at a conference of the Conservative Political Action Committee: "He has been promoting and elevating women in the Trump Corporation — in the Trump campaign, in the Trump Cabinet, certainly in the Trump White House. It's just a very natural affinity for him." THE FACTS: No such elevation of women has taken place, when Trump's choices for the Cabinet and top White House aides are compared with those of other presidents in recent decades. Indeed, there's been backsliding. — Cabinet: Trump has nominated four women for Cabinet or Cabinet-level jobs. That's fewer than Democrats Barack Obama (seven) and Bill Clinton (six) had for their first Cabinets, and the same number as Republican George W. Bush chose out of the gate. As well, women chosen by Trump are in less senior positions — both in prominence and in the line of succession to the presidency — than some of the women nominated by his predecessors. For example, Obama's first secretary of state, a top-tier post, was Hillary Clinton. Bush made Condoleezza Rice his secretary of state in his second term. Clinton's first Cabinet had a woman as attorney general. Trump's top four Cabinet positions — secretary of state, attorney general, treasury secretary and defense secretary — are all filled by men. Looking more broadly, women occupied as much as 35 percent of Obama's Cabinet at their maximum numbers, compared with the historic high of 41 percent during Clinton's second term, according to the Center for American Women and Politics. Women make up 17 percent of Trump's Cabinet choices, the center found. At their height, women comprised 18 percent of Ronald Reagan's Cabinet, the same percentage under George H.W. Bush and 30 percent under George W. Bush, the center found. Trump chose Elaine Chao for Labor, Betsy DeVos for Education and Linda McMahon for the Small Business Administration. As for jobs that are not traditionally part of the Cabinet but considered Cabinet-level, Nikki Haley is ambassador to the United Nations and Trump has not named someone to lead the Council of Economic Advisers. — White House: The percentage of women in top White House jobs is shaping up to be lower than during at least five of the last six presidential terms, according to an analysis Monday by USA Today. The high for women in senior West Wing jobs was 52 percent under Clinton in 2000, the analysis found, while the percentage dipped to 28 percent in 2008, under George W. Bush. For Trump, it's 23 percent of known staff. The White House quarreled with USA Today's findings, saying the percentage is actually 31 percent, but refused to back up its figure by giving names or titles for those it considers senior. As for White House staff overall, the percentage is "nearly the same" as for past administrations, the White House told the paper. Associated Press writer Jim Drinkard contributed to this report. EDITOR'S NOTE _ A look at the veracity of claims by political figures

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