Institute, WV, United States

West Virginia State University

www.wvstateu.edu
Institute, WV, United States

West Virginia State University is a historically black public university in Institute, West Virginia, United States. In the Charleston-metro area, the school is usually referred to simply as "State" or "West Virginia State". It is one of the original 1890 Land-Grant colleges and the smallest land-grant institution in the country. The University is a member-school of Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of West Virginia’s best colleges for 2017. 17 four-year schools were highlighted, with West Virginia Wesleyan College, Bethany College, Wheeling Jesuit University, West Virginia University Institute of Technology and West Virginia University scoring in the top five. Of the 10 two-year schools included in the ranking, Cabell County Career Technology Center, West Virginia Northern Community College, Blue Ridge Community and Technical College, Mountwest Community and Technical College and Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College were the top five. A full list of winning schools is included below. “These West Virginia schools have created a culture of both academic and career success,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “When we look at measures of alumni success next to each school’s quality of education, these are the clear leaders in the state.” To be included on West Virginia’s “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on more than a dozen additional data points including diversity of program offerings, career services, educational counseling, financial aid availability, graduation rates and student/teacher ratios. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in West Virginia” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in West Virginia for 2017 include: Alderson Broaddus University Bethany College Bluefield State College Concord University Davis & Elkins College Fairmont State University Glenville State College Marshall University Ohio Valley University Shepherd University University of Charleston West Liberty University West Virginia State University West Virginia University West Virginia University Institute of Technology West Virginia Wesleyan College Wheeling Jesuit University The Best Two-Year Colleges in West Virginia for 2017 include: Ben Franklin Career Center Blue Ridge Community and Technical College BridgeValley Community & Technical College Cabell County Career Technology Center Eastern West Virginia Community and Technical College Mountwest Community and Technical College New River Community and Technical College Pierpont Community and Technical College Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College West Virginia Northern Community College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

In a lawsuit, West Virginia State University accuses Dow Chemical and Bayer of polluting the groundwater under its campus with three likely carcinogens: 1,4-dioxane, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chloroform. Although the suit, filed on April 27 in the Circuit Court of Kanawha County, places no dollar value on a remedy, it seeks cleanup as well as compensatory and punitive damages, including a “national public relations program” to restore the school’s reputation. Dow operates the nearby Institute Industrial Park, where Bayer is a tenant. Dow “must be held accountable for the damage it has done to our property and reputation,” university President Anthony L. Jenkins says. The industrial park was the site of a methyl isocyanate plant once owned by Bayer and Union Carbide, now a subsidiary of Dow. Although the plant closed several years ago, for years, residents of Institute, W.Va., worried about a leak, mindful of the 1984 accident at a similar Union Carbide facility in India that killed thousands. In announcing the lawsuit, the university acknowledges that it does not use the groundwater on campus. It says the contamination “does not pose a current health risk to anyone on campus,” adding that “outside experts have concluded that the available evidence does not indicate a threat to human health from [the] contaminants.” Dow, pointing to the university’s acknowledgment of a lack of health concern, says, “Every reason exists allowing the university to use the property as they originally intended.” It adds that it has met, and will continue to meet, its remediation commitments “with oversight from EPA and the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection.” Bayer tells C&EN that it “will be looking into this matter carefully.” The firm adds that it “takes its environmental obligations seriously.”


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

In a lawsuit, West Virginia State University is accusing Dow Chemical and Bayer of polluting the groundwater under its campus with three likely carcinogens: 1,4-dioxane, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chloroform. While the suit, filed on April 27 in the Circuit Court of Kanawha County, places no dollar value on a remedy, it seeks cleanup as well as compensatory and punitive damages, including a “national public relations program” to restore the school’s reputation. Dow operates the nearby Institute Industrial Park, where Bayer is a tenant. Dow “must be held accountable for the damage it has done to our property and reputation,” university President Anthony L. Jenkins says. The industrial park was the site of a methyl isocyanate plant once owned by Bayer and Union Carbide, now a subsidiary of Dow. Although the plant closed several years ago, for years, Institute, W.Va., residents worried about a leak, mindful of the 1984 accident at a similar Union Carbide facility in India that killed thousands. In announcing the suit, the university says the contamination “does not pose a current health risk to anyone on campus.” It also notes that “outside experts have concluded that the available evidence does not indicate a threat to human health from [the] contaminants.” West Virginia State University is a historically black university that is now fully integrated. Dow, pointing to the university’s acknowledgement of a lack of health concern, says “every reason exists allowing the university to use the property as they originally intended.” It adds that it has met, and will continue to meet, its remediation commitments “with oversight from EPA and the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection.” Bayer tells C&EN that it “will be looking into this matter carefully.” The firm adds that it “takes its environmental obligations seriously.”


Dispute Over 'Fearless Girl' and 'Charging Bull' Statues Kevin L Smith Dean of Libraries, University of Kansas University of Kansas Smith can discuss the dispute over the "Fearless Girl" and "Charging Bull" statues in New York, the associated copyrights for each, copyright law and intellectual property: "This case is especially interesting since it involves a relatively new provision of the copyright act, the Visual Artists' Rights Act of 1990, which secures some specific 'moral rights' for a limited group of visual artists. Interpretation of VARA has been difficult for the courts, and this case could really push on the issue of what a right of integrity, not recognized in any other part of U.S. copyright law, really entails. How much, we might ask, should an artist be able to control the meaning of his or her own work?" Contact: Mike Krings, mkrings@ku.edu Supreme Court: Trinity Lutheran v. Pauley Daniel Conkle Professor Indiana University's Maurer School of Law "The Supreme Court in recent decades has moved steadily toward a 'neutrality' understanding of the First Amendment's Establishment Clauses. Under this approach, the government generally is free to include religious organizations in otherwise general programs of funding, for example, through voucher programs for private schools. At the same time, in the interest of federalism, the Court has permitted states, applying state constitutional law, to enforce a stricter separation of church and state. Missouri has denied funding for the church playground based upon a state constitutional provision. But by denying the funding the state has effectively discriminated against church-sponsored daycares, presenting the question of whether the state constitutional provision itself violates the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment," says Conkle. "The question is whether the First Amendment requires neutrality between religious and nonreligious organizations, and if so, then the state constitutional provision will have to give way. Many state constitutions include provisions similar to Missouri's, so as a result, the Court's decision could have broad implications." Conkle is available to comment on the oral arguments in Trinity Lutheran v. Pauley (4/19). According to Conkle, the case raises important issues, not only about church-state separation, but also about federalism and the intersection of state and federal constitutional law. An expert on the intersection of constitutional law and religion, Conkle is the author of Constitutional Law: The Religion Clauses, which provides a theoretical and conceptual framework for understanding and evaluating the components of the Supreme Court's constitutional doctrine. His research addresses constitutional law and theory, religious liberty and the role of religion in American law, politics and public life. Conkle is also a Nelson Poynter Scholar at the Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions. Bio: http://www.law.indiana.edu/about/people/bio.php?name=conkle-daniel-o Website: http://www.law.indiana.edu Contact: Kemba Neptune, Kemba.neptune@finnpartners.com Relationship-Building Between Law Enforcement and the Community Bill Cassell Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Campbellsville University Campbellsville, KY The importance of fostering understanding between police departments and the communities they serve through pro-active education and relationship building has never been more apparent. Says Cassell: "Community policing is an essential step in building trust between local departments and the communities they serve. In light of today's divisive political environment pro-active outreach is a necessary relationship building step. Unfortunately, race relations and secure communities have been in the spotlight lately. No strategy that encourages officers to target certain racial or ethnic groups is going to turn out to be positive in today's culture. Local cooperation, mutual respect and education about use of force policies are key to increasing understanding of not only police work but of each other." Cassell is a retired law enforcement and chief of police, with over two decades of experience, most of which spent teaching others. In his role as manager at the Kentucky Department of Criminal Justice he planned, implemented and managed instructors for all law enforcement officer trainings across the state. Cassell has numerous certifications, in topics such as situational leadership, ethics, and community vulnerability assessment methodology.  In addition to these topics he is available to discuss ethics in policing, leadership and communications training, and the role of social media and technology in police departments. Contact: Jessica Brown, Jessica.brown@finnpartners.com The Increased Strain on Law Enforcement Dr. Walter E. Stroupe Chair & Graduate Coordinator, Criminal Justice Department at West Virginia State University West Virginia State University Charleston, WV The current challenges and controversies surrounding law enforcement departments include issues related to officer shortage, inadequate agency budgets, and public policy impacting state and local police departments. Says Dr. Stroupe: "Lost in our national conversation over policing is that America's social services are coming under an enormous amount of stress. We are seeing increased burnout and retirements across the spectrum, from child protective service workers and teachers to emergency responders, and it has been up to law enforcement to pick up the slack without increased budgets and staff. These new roles in policing are leading to departments stretched thin, funding shortages, and an overall inability to improve services. What law enforcement agencies across the country need now are more dedicated funds so that they can effectively adjust to new responsibilities, recruit better officers, and implement long-term strategies for their communities."  Dr. Stroupe has over 20 years of law enforcement experience, including as a state Field Trooper, First Lieutenant, and retiring as the Assistant Director of Training at the West Virginia State Police Academy. He has been involved in developing and instructing criminal justice curriculum, including classes in race and gendered issues, domestic terrorism, sex crimes, and community oriented policing. Contact: Michael Timberlake, michaeltimberlake@finnpartners.com The Future of Learning is Personal Dr. Mickey Blackwell Assistant Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator, Department of Education West Virginia State University Charleston, WV With advancements in the use of technology and student data in the classroom, personalized education initiatives are the future. Says Dr. Blackwell "Personalized learning is where we are all headed. Soon every child will have their own plans, tailored tests, and teachers will know in real-time how that student is performing. It will be up to teachers, with the help of their administrators, to craft new materials, exercises, and tasks that can bring out the best in their students. Plus with the right support, states and districts can that embrace this learning revolution and will be better equipped to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their students and what teachers need to be successful in the classroom. This is an immense challenge for the education system, but it will pay endless dividends if fully supported by teachers, policymakers, and parents." Dr. Blackwell has over 30 years of experience in teaching and school administration, including serving as superintendent and principal at multiple schools, and currently is the executive director for the West Virginia Association for Elementary and Middle School Principals. Dr. Blackwell can speak to developing district-based curriculum goals and related staff development and staff, as well as the impact of public policy on state public school educators and school administrators.  Contact: Michael Timberlake, michaeltimberlake@finnpartners.com Preparing College Students for Life After Graduation Marjorie Silverman Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Internship Studies FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology) State University of New York New York, NY The transition of college students to the working world can be extremely challenging and stressful. Says Silverman: "The pressure on college students is at a dangerous level. Student debt, academic demands and a highly competitive job market leave college students overwhelmed, overstressed and exhausted. It has never been more urgent for higher education institutions to provide real-life experiential education that prepares the student for life after graduation." Working with leading employers in multiple industries, her areas of concentration include engaging students in an increasingly distracted world, expanding opportunities and commitments for non-traditional age students and innovative experiential educational programming. Silverman holds an M.A.in Organizational Psychology/Leadership from Columbia University. Contact: Ken Ferber, ferber@trueify.net Liberal Arts Education in the World of STEM David Harrity English Professor, School of Arts and Sciences Campbellsville University Campbellsville, KY "We continually hear about the important role STEM education plays in regards to job opportunities. I argue that the movement toward pragmatic STEM education is creating a loss in the way people approach debate, communication and creativity. I see STEM degrees and liberal arts degrees as equally important. The ability to express differing opinions and take part in active listening is becoming an increasingly important skill needed to be effective in our deeply divided communities today. The philosophy behind a liberal arts education is for students to be exposed to challenging and thought provoking ideas. If we are truly committed to seeing the next generation succeed, we need to place equal value on both STEM and liberal arts education." An established writer, Professor Harrity has authored a number of books focused on poetry and imagination's connection to theology. In addition to the creative writing process, Harrity can discuss the positive and negative links between social media and human connection as well as the cultural shift toward enhanced self-selection which means people are no longer forced to process information that is difficult, emotional or uncomfortable. Contact: Jessica Brown, Jessica.brown@finnpartners.com Following are links to job listings for staff and freelance writers, editors and producers. You can view these and more job listings on our Job Board: https://prnmedia.prnewswire.com/community/jobs/ Following are links to other news and resources we think you might find useful. If you have an item you think other reporters would be interested in and would like us to include in a future alert, please drop us a line at profnetalerts@prnewswire.com PROFNET is an exclusive service of PR Newswire. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/profnet-experts-available-on-copyright-law-education-and-technology-law-enforcement-more-300442067.html


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Tedyra Shalon Robinson, LSW, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. Tedyra is a highly trained and qualified Social Worker with nearly two decades of experience in her field. With extensive expertise in travel social work and case management, Tedyra is currently working in Lincoln Park, Michigan. Tedyra was educated at West Virginia State University and Wayne County Community College, where she graduated and became a Licensed Social Worker. An inductee of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, Tedyra attributes her success to her strong faith in God, and dedication to her work. When she is not working, she enjoys spending quality time with her family. Learn more about Tedyra here: http://iahcp.com/8138246.html and be sure to read her upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare.


The luridus species-group of Nearctic Pachybrachis Chevrolat, 1836 is defined and revised. The group is composed of ten species, including two described as new species: Pachybrachis confusus Bowditch, Pachybrachis dilatatus Suffrian, Pachybrachis discoideus Bowditch, Pachybrachis femoratus (Olivier), Pachybrachis luridus (Fabricius), Pachybrachis rileyi Barney, Pachybrachis sherriae Barney, new species, Pachybrachis shirleyae Barney, new species, Pachybrachis subfasciatus (LeConte), and Pachybrachis turbidus (LeConte). Neotypes are designated for Cryptocephalus femoratus Olivier, 1808, Cryptocephalus subfasciatus LeConte, 1824, Pachybrachys impurus Suffrian, 1852, and Pachybrachys dilatatus Suffrian, 1852. Lectotypes are designated for Cryptocephalus luridus Fabricius, 1798, Cryptocephalus aesculi Melsheimer, 1846, and Pachybrachys characteristicus Suffrian, 1852. Pachybrachys impurus Suffrian, 1852 and Pachybrachys impurus var. umbrosus Fall, 1915 are synonymized with P. subfasciatus (new synonymies). Pachybrachys characteristicus Suffrian, 1852 and Pachybrachys femoratus var. aquilonis Fall, 1915 are confirmed as synonymies of P. femoratus (Olivier), and Pachybrachis luridus var. nigrinus Blatchley, 1910 and Pachybrachis luridus var. festivus Fall, 1915 are confirmed as synonymies with P. luridus. Twenty-nine new state records are confirmed for members of this species-group. A key to species is given, and a description, figure, and range map is presented for each species.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Carl E. Moyler’s new book, On Freedom and Revolt: A Comparative Investigation, ($18.49, paperback, 9781498435208; $9.99, e-book, 9781498435215) compares the writings and thoughts of two Nobel Prize winners – Albert Camus and Martin Luther King, Jr. – concerning tyranny, injustice, war, racism, poverty, exploitation and war as these oppress the peace and welfare of people. Moyler shows how these two leaders from different cultural and racial backgrounds, possibly unknown to one another – one a humanitarian agnostic and the other a seminary trained preacher – find common ground in addressing the critical issues of their time – many of the same issues being faced by some societies today. As Moyler uncovers in his riveting investigation, Camus and King were born, reared and lived as personal witnesses to many deplorable and unfair issues in society. He reveals how neither man was willing to stand in the face of those issues and do nothing. Therefore their response, based on their calling, was a revolt for freedom. This book will prove why today, they are both among the heroes who are well remembered around the world. “I hope readers will take away the thoughts, actions, and means that could bring about what both men identified as a world community of hope and caring and being ‘my brother’s keeper,’” states the author. Carl E. Moyler was born in Newport News, Virginia – one of eight children. He currently resides in Dayton, Ohio. He was a graduate of West Virginia State University in 1954 with a major in foreign languages. He holds a Masters degree in French from Case Wester Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. He holds a Ph.D. Comparative Literature from the Union Institute/University in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was a high school teacher of foreign languages, and a professor and an administrator at Urbana University and Wilberforce University. He is also a small business founder and president/CEO. Xulon Press, a division of Salem Media Group, is the world’s largest Christian self-publisher, with more than 15,000 titles published to date. Retailers may order On Freedom and Revolt: A Comparative Investigation through Ingram Book Company and/or Spring Arbor Book Distributors. The book is available online through xulonpress.com/bookstore, amazon.com, and barnesandnoble.com.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 299.99K | Year: 2016

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities-Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) Research Initiation Awards (RIAs) provide support to STEM junior faculty at HBCUs who are starting to build a research program, as well as for mid-career faculty who may have returned to the faculty ranks after holding an administrative post or who need to redirect and rebuild a research program. Faculty members may pursue research at their home institution, at an NSF-funded Center, at a research intensive institution or at a national laboratory. The RIA projects are expected to help further the faculty members research capability and effectiveness, to improve research and teaching at his or her home institution, and to involve undergraduate students in research experiences. With support from the National Science Foundation, West Virginia State University (WVSU) will conduct research to provide in-depth knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that regulate seed storage compounds, including the identification and characterization of genes that regulate the storage of lipids, starch, and proteins in seeds. This project will strengthen WVSUs plant biosciences research program, ensure student achievement in research, and the creation of a pipeline of graduates who will go on to pursue STEM careers in the plant sciences. In addition, this project will enhance intra-and inter-institutional interdisciplinary research collaborations and provide collaborative mentoring of students.

The objective of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms of action of cupins and their associated gene networks in plant nutrient metabolism and storage pathways using the Arabidopsis model. Specifically, this study aims to: 1) determine whether cupins are required for seed storage compound regulation in Arabidopsis, 2) determine if ectopic expression of cupins in Arabidopsis alters the production of seed compounds and plant physiology and growth, and 3) characterize the transcriptome signature of wild-type and cupin mutant Arabidopsis plants that produce varying levels of seed storage compounds. Findings from this work will determine whether cupins, a previously unidentified network of proteins, are master regulators of seed storage compound metabolism. Cupins may significantly reduce the negative effects of current agricultural practices on the environment, including overuse of arable land and water and increased use of fertilizers and pesticides. This work will be conducted in collaboration with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The research and educational activities will advance the academic mission of WVSU.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 499.25K | Year: 2012

This Type 1A project is working to increase the number of graduates receiving baccalaureate degrees in STEM through focused recruiting, early academic support, and ongoing mentoring and student engagement. These activities build on existing support structures at the university and adapt effective practices from other universities to increase STEM enrollment and to reduce attrition among first- and second-year students. The recruiting efforts include evidence-based practices for non-traditional recruiting of underrepresented minorities through contact with parents, churches, and other community organizations. Early academic support features a five-week credit-bearing residential bridge program to address common deficiencies in mathematics, longitudinal learning communities to establish a system of major-oriented peer support, and peer-led supplemental instruction to improve student performance in key freshman- and sophomore-level introductory courses in the STEM programs. Ongoing mentoring and student engagement build on the universitys prior success in placing students in undergraduate research positions and internships with university faculty and regional STEM-related employers. The STEP to Success Program is expected to increase enrollment of first-time freshmen in STEM majors by 20% and increase year-to-year retention by 10 percentage points, producing 16 additional STEM graduates per year by the end of the award period, including at least 10 per year from groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM. The intellectual merit of this project lies in its goal of establishing a lasting institutional infrastructure to continue its targeted recruiting efforts, early academic support, and provision of opportunities for student participation in research and internships. The project is exercising broader impact by working through an existing network of sister Historically Black Colleges and Universities to disseminate the results and findings of the project and offer training to faculty, administrators, and students at other institutions interested in replicating the approaches the project is finding most effective.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 67.55K | Year: 2011

The West Virginia State University (WVSU) Planning Grant for STEM Program Evaluation and Improvement is an 18-month, two phase planning process designed to 1) identify critical areas for improvement within the institutions undergraduate STEM programs and 2) develop an institutional plan for addressing those needs. The planning project represents the most comprehensive review of WVSUs STEM programs in recent years and presents an opportunity to develop a plan to transform the institutions offerings to better prepare students for work and further study in STEM fields. The evaluation phase of the project includes several data gathering activities designed to characterize student and faculty perception of program strengths and weaknesses, characterize program successes and challenges as demonstrated from historical student outcomes, identify previously unrecognized barriers to student retention and success, and compare current programs against benchmarks of success observed in STEM programs at other HBCUs. In addition, the evaluation phase includes an extensive review of regional STEM workforce needs that will inform the planning phase. A report on regional STEM workforce needs and a report on evidence-based approaches for improving STEM programs will be made available to HBCUs, other institutions, and the public.

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