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Lewisburg, WV, United States

The West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, located in Lewisburg, West Virginia, United States, is a public free-standing and independent medical school. The mission of the school is to educate students from diverse backgrounds as lifelong learners and to prepare them for careers in osteopathic medicine with a focus on primary care and rural medicine although a significant percentage of graduates go on to practice in many of the medical specialties. It is one of three medical schools in West Virginia and the sole institution that grants the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree. WVSOM has 778 students at present.According to U.S. News & World Report, medical students at the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine graduate with more debt than any other medical school in the United States. Of the top ten schools that graduate physicians with the most debt, WVSOM is the only public school. In 2014, the U.S. News & World Report ranked WVSOM program third for graduates entering into primary care specialties and as the eleventh best rural medicine program. Wikipedia.


Thatcher J.D.,West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

This set of animated lessons provides examples of how transport proteins interact in coupled systems to produce physiologic effects. The gastric pumps animation depicts the secretion of hydrochloric acid into the gastric lumen. The animation called glucose absorption depicts glucose absorption by intestinal epithelial cells. The CFTR animation explains how the cystic fi brosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR) functions as a key component of a coupled system of transport proteins that clears the pulmonary system of mucus and inhaled particulates. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these processes. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology. Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science; all rights reserved. Source


Thatcher J.D.,West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

This Teaching Resource provides and describes two animated lessons that illustrate general properties of transport proteins. The lesson called "transport protein classes" depicts major classes and subclasses of transport proteins. The "transporters, mechanism of action" lesson explains how transporters and P class ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) pumps function. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, and biophysics. Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science; all rights reserved. Source


Thatcher J.D.,West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

This Teaching Resource provides three animated lessons that describe the storage and utilization of energy across plasma membranes. The "Na,K ATPase" animation explains how these pumps establish the electrochemical gradient that stores energy across plasma membranes. The "ATP synthesizing complexes" animation shows how these complexes transfer energy from the inner mitochondrial membrane to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The "action potential" lesson explains how charged membranes are used to propagate signals along the axons of neurons. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiatelevel course that describes these important factors. Courses that might employ them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology. Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science; all rights reserved. Source


Ward P.J.,West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine
Clinical Anatomy | Year: 2011

Three approaches to study have been described in phenomenographic educational research: deep, strategic, and surface. Deep approaches to learning have been correlated with meaningful learning and academic success, whereas surface approaches produce an externalization of learning and poor outcomes. Students adopting a strategic approach adopt either a deep or surface approach in response to perceived examination demands. Despite being well known in Europe and Australia, this research paradigm has been applied sporadically in the United States. In this study, the approaches to study of a group of first year American medical students were collected using the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students instrument at the beginning and end of their first year to find how consistent these approaches remained over time. At both times, the majority of participants adopted deep approaches, followed by strategic and then surface approaches. The percentage of participants using a surface approach grew during the first year but never exceeded 10%. The mean anatomy grades of students adopting each approach were then compared to find how each approach correlated with success in the course. Mean grades of students using a strategic approach were significantly higher than average at both times. Students who maintained a strategic approach throughout the first year had significantly higher mean grades than average while students who changed to a surface approach had significantly worse mean anatomy grades. Problem-based students had significantly higher scores on several deep submeasures than lecture-based peers and female students demonstrated greater fear of failure than male peers at both times. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Source


Hanna J.B.,West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine | Schmitt D.,Duke University
American Journal of Physical Anthropology | Year: 2011

All primates regularly move within three-dimensional arboreal environments and must often climb, but little is known about the energetic costs of this critical activity. Limited previous work on the energetics of incline locomotion suggests that there may be differential selective pressures for large compared to small primates in choosing to exploit a complex arboreal environment. Necessary metabolic and gait data have never been collected to examine this possibility and biomechanical mechanisms that might explain size-based differences in the cost of arboreal movement. Energetics and kinematics were collected for five species of primate during climbing and horizontal locomotion. Subjects moved on a treadmill with a narrow vertical substrate and one with a narrow horizontal substrate at their maximum sustainable speed for 10-20 min while oxygen consumption was monitored. Data during climbing were compared to those during horizontal locomotion and across size. Results show that climbing energetic costs were similar to horizontal costs for small primates (<0.5 kg) but were nearly double for larger species. Spatio-temporal gait characteristics suggest that the relationship between the cost of locomotion and the rate of force production changes between the two locomotor modes. Thus, the main determinants of climbing costs are fundamentally different from those during horizontal locomotion. These new results combining spatiotemporal and energetic data confirm and expand on our previous argument (Hanna et al.: Science 320 (2008) 898) that similar costs of horizontal and vertical locomotion in small primates facilitated the successful occupation of a fine-branch arboreal milieu by the earliest primates. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Source

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