Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Pradhan P.,University of Calcutta | Dutta A.K.,University of Calcutta | Roy A.,West Bengal Biodiversity Board | Basu S.K.,University of Lethbridge | Acharya K.,University of Calcutta
Biodiversity | Year: 2013

The diversity of macrofungi in the lateritic region of West Bengal was explored and 120 species, one subgenus and a variety, having eight ecological functions, were found to grow among three types of habitats, i.e. natural forests, plantation forests and villages. Yate's corrected chi-square (χ2) test statistic was performed upon the 2 × 2 table (contingency table) and testing the null hypotheses of independence of observed cell frequencies of the presence/absence of a species in a given habitat type. Various degrees of specificities of macrofungi to their habitats were observed, i.e. Amanita vaginata, Astraeus hygrometricus, Laccaria laccata, Lactarius zonarius, Porphyrellus malaccensis, Russula brevipes, Russula delica, Russula emetica and Russula laurocerasi were absolutely specific for natural forests; Pisolithus arhizus and Ramaria fumigata were absolutely specific for plantation forests; Auricularia auricula, Schizophyllum commune and Termitomyces clypeatus (only association coefficient 100%) were found to absolutely specific for village habitat. MS Excel-based formulas for calculation of association/specificity of species to habitat and species to species as well as other diversity indices are provided. Local and tribal populations used 19 species of macrofungi during their fruiting period, of which 17 had culinary values and four were locally considered medicinal. This study is a first of its kind, and has various applications to allied disciplines in understanding diversity, ecology and biological prospects of the macrofungal realm. © 2013 Copyright Biodiversity Conservancy International. Source


Pradhan P.,University of Calcutta | Dutta A.K.,University of Calcutta | Roy A.,West Bengal Biodiversity Board | Basu S.K.,University of Lethbridge | Acharya K.,University of Calcutta
Biodiversity | Year: 2012

Macrofungi are broad in diversity and play an important role in sustaining ecosystems. However, the quantity and quality of their habitat is decreasing and the threat of extinction looms over the remaining 95% of the world's undiscovered fungal species. There is an urgent need for inventorisation, monitoring and conservation of macrofungi and the habitats supporting their growth. This paper focuses on the species richness, assemblage and spatial ecology of the macrofungi whose lifecycles are intricately woven with natural Shorea robusta forests in the lateritic region of West Bengal, India. Decreasing soil productivity, poor regeneration of Shorea seedlings and subsequent habitat degradation for macrofungi are a prime cause of concern. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Monotropoideae is a mycoheterotrophic subfamily of Ericaceae. Its members are highly specific to a particular fungal family, which has attributed to the rarity and limited distribution of Monotropoideae. In the past two decades, there are considerable developments in understanding their biology and biogeography, among which, the distribution of Monotropa uniflora L. and M. hypopitys L. has been extensively studied. In this contribution, Ecological Niche Modeling of M. uniflora has been conducted to test its earlier proposed distribution in South Asia, to test the spatial scale of the said proposal, to test its potential distribution as a surrogate for range of Monotropoideae in South Asia and to prioritize conservation areas for M. uniflora in the region. The model was built with five occurrence details of the rare plant M. uniflora in Western and Eastern Himalaya, in relation to 19 bioclimatic explanatory variables, performed in MaxEnt. The results show the good performance of the model with the training AUC of 0.994. 1,50,316 square Km. of suitable areas have been predicted for the growth of M. uniflora (IHS ≥0.5) in South Asia, many areas of which is in line with earlier distributional reports. The bioclimatic variables are able to predict and suitably justify the spatial distribution of M. uniflora. The predicted range of the species could be established for potential distribution of other Asian Monotropoids like Monotropastrum and Cheilotheca. © 2015 Society for Indonesian Biodiversity. All rights reserved. Source


Dutta A.K.,University of Calcutta | Pradhan P.,University of Calcutta | Roy A.,West Bengal Biodiversity Board | Acharya K.,University of Calcutta
Check List | Year: 2015

The present study reports Crinipellis cupreostipes (first described from Thailand) as a new record for Indian mycobiota. A phylogenetic analysis based on nrDNA ITS shows that C. cupreostipes can be readily distinguished from other morphologically similar species such as Crinipellis nigricaulis var. macrospora. A detailed taxonomic description with illustrations and an artificial key to Crinipellis species previously reported from India and its neighboring countries are provided. © 2015 Check List and Authors. Source


Paloi S.,University of Calcutta | Dutta A.K.,University of Calcutta | Pradhan P.,University of Calcutta | Roy A.,West Bengal Biodiversity Board | Acharya K.,University of Calcutta
Phytotaxa | Year: 2016

Russula buyckii, a new species of Russula (subgen. Incrustatula, sect. Lilaceinae and subsect. Lilaceinae) is described from Eastern Himalaya, India. Its macro-and micro-morphological features are described in detail and compared with those of similar species. Identification and categorization of R. buyckii was supported by the molecular phylogenetic analysis based on the nrDNA ITS sequence data. © 2016 Magnolia Press. Source

Discover hidden collaborations