Central Hospital of Wendeng

Weihai, China

Central Hospital of Wendeng

Weihai, China
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Zhang Z.-Q.,Qingdao University | Sun X.,Central Hospital of Taian | Chi X.-L.,Central Hospital of Wendeng | Jiang H.,Qingdao University
Journal of Brain Science | Year: 2013

Objective: Modeling a stable and reproducible animal model of Parkinson's disease by rotenone intraperitoneal injection for further pathogenesis study of PD. Methods: Twenty-seven male Wistar rats were used, which were randomly divided into three groups on average (Rotenone Injection, Vehicle Injection and Normal group). Rats of rotenone injection group (RIG) were administered rotenone (3.0 mg/kg/day) in a specialized vehicle through daily intraperitoneal injection; rats of vehicle injection group (VIG) were administered only special vehicle in the same way, rats of normal group (NG) didn't receive any injection. Checked the changes of its behavior and numbers of SNpc neurons to determine the model successful or not. Results: Six rats of RIG developed part of Parkinson's symptoms at different time. All rats of RIG emerged behavioral deficits through rearing behavior testing and square bridge testing, and the mean number of SNpc neurons showed significant reduction. There were no behavioral deficits and changes of the mean number of SNpc neurons in rats of NG and VIG. Conclusion: Model of Parkinson's disease by rotenone intraperitoneal injection was successfully established. This form of the rotenone model is stable and easy to reproduce, and may provide a new excellent supporter to related studies.


Xie D.,Qingdao University | Sun Y.,Qingdao University | Wang L.,Qingdao University | Li X.,Peoples Hospital of Linyi | And 3 more authors.
Molecular Medicine Reports | Year: 2016

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is considered to be a potent cell-damaging agent in various cell lineages; however, the effect of UV light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation on human cells remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of UV LED irradiation emitting at 280 nm on cultured HL-60 human leukemia cells, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. HL-60 cells were irradiated with UV LED (8, 15, 30 and 60 J/m2) and incubated for 2 h after irradiation. The rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis, the cell cycle profiles and the mRNA expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were detected using cell counting kit-8, multicaspase assays, propidium iodide staining and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The results showed that UV LED irradiation (8-60 J/m2) inhibited the proliferation of HL-60 cells in a dose-dependent manner. UV LED at 8-30 J/m2 induced dose-dependent apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, and inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA, while UV LED at 60 J/m2 induced necrosis. In conclusion, 280 nm UV LED irradiation inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis and necrosis in cultured HL-60 cells. In addition, the cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and the downregulation of Bcl-2 mRNA expression were shown to be involved in UV LED-induced apoptosis.


PubMed | Central Hospital of Wendeng, Qingdao University and Peoples Hospital of Linyi
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular medicine reports | Year: 2016

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is considered to be a potent cell-damaging agent in various cell lineages; however, the effect of UV lightemitting diode (LED) irradiation on human cells remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of UV LED irradiation emitting at 280 nm on cultured HL60 human leukemia cells, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. HL60 cells were irradiated with UV LED (8, 15, 30 and 60 J/m2) and incubated for 2 h after irradiation. The rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis, the cell cycle profiles and the mRNA expression of Bcell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) were detected using cell counting kit8, multicaspase assays, propidium iodide staining and reverse transcriptionquantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The results showed that UV LED irradiation (860 J/m2) inhibited the proliferation of HL60 cells in a dosedependent manner. UV LED at 830 J/m2 induced dosedependent apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, and inhibited the expression of Bcl2 mRNA, while UV LED at 60 J/m2 induced necrosis. In conclusion, 280 nm UV LED irradiation inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis and necrosis in cultured HL60 cells. In addition, the cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and the downregulation of Bcl2 mRNA expression were shown to be involved in UV LED-induced apoptosis.

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