Wenck Associates Inc

Dodge Center, MN, United States

Wenck Associates Inc

Dodge Center, MN, United States
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Anderson K.,Wenck Associates Inc. | Anderson J.,Wenck Associates Inc. | Lagerstrom M.,Integrys Business Support LLC
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2012

Wisconsin Public Service Corp (WPSC) is currently undergoing construction to allow the installation of a multi-pollutant control technology commercially known as ReACT at its Weston Generating Station located in Rothschild, WI. ReACT is an advanced regenerative activated coke (AC) technology that provides control of sulfur dioxide (SO2) with a coincident reduction of NOx, mercury, and other pollutants. The system also produces commercial grade sulfuric acid, a commercially marketable by-product. ReACT will be installed on Weston Unit 3, WPSC's second newest and second largest coal-fired electric generating unit that burns primarily Powder River Basin coal. A discussion covers the technical aspects of ReACT, its advantages over more traditional control technologies, and the permitting approach and outcomes. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 106th AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Chicago, IL 6/25-28/2013).


Guerra S.A.,Wenck Associates Inc. | Lane D.D.,University of Kansas | Carter R.E.,University of Kansas | Peltier E.,University of Kansas | And 2 more authors.
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2012

A new data analysis technique developed while evaluating continuous emission data collected from a trash compactor is presented. The evaluation involved tailpipe sampling with a portable emission monitoring system from a diesel fueled 525-hp trash compactor. The sampling campaign took place by running the compactor with regular number 2 diesel, 20% biodiesel mix (B20) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels. The purpose was to determine the possible emission reductions in NOx and CO2 from the use of B20 and ULSD in an off-road vehicle. The technique allowed for a valid use of the general linear model with engine speed as the covariate factor to test day, fuel type and compactor factors. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 106th AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Chicago, IL 6/25-28/2013).


Beck B.F.,University of Minnesota | Beck B.F.,Wenck Associates Inc | Johnson N.W.,University of Minnesota
Applied Geochemistry | Year: 2014

The production of methylmercury (MeHg), a bioaccumulative neurotoxin, in freshwater systems is primarily driven by naturally occurring sulfate reducing bacteria in anoxic sediment and waters. This research used laboratory microcosms to examine the influence of sulfate on MeHg production and partitioning in sulfate-impacted freshwater estuary sediment. A laboratory sulfate addition experiment exposed 20cm diameter intact sediment cores with varying organic carbon content to sulfate concentrations in the overlying water ranging from 5 to 50mgL-1. Results from the 6month incubation suggest that net MeHg production in sediment from open-water areas of the St. Louis River Estuary was not directly related to overlying water sulfate. Mercury mobility, as indicated by porewater concentrations, appeared to be related to the quantity of organic carbon and sulfur in sediment. Laboratory flux estimates were consistent with porewater concentrations and provided a means to compare diffusion-driven MeHg loading from sediment to MeHg loading from upstream sources. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Guerra S.A.,Wenck Associates Inc. | Bartels L.A.,Wenck Associates Inc.
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2014

A case study is presented, which addresses three areas of conservatism in current dispersion modeling practices, including the use of a maximum constant emission rate for equipment that is transient in operation, the current methods to account for NOx to NO2 conversion; and the use of an overly conservative background concentration. The case study evaluates a facility comprised of four reciprocating internal combustion engines that operate under a peak shaving agreement of ≤ 250 hr/yr. The modeling evaluation includes a comparison of modeled concentrations obtained using the current modeling methods and those obtained applying the Emission Variability Processor (EMVAP); the updated Ambient Ratio Method (ARM2), and the combinations of EMVAP and the ARM2 Method. Justification for the use of a reasonable background concentration to combine with the AERMOD predicted concentration is presented. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AWMA's 107th Annual Conference & Exhibition (Long Beach, CA 6/24-27/2014).


Langer T.A.,Central Michigan University | Langer T.A.,Wenck Associates Inc. | Murry B.A.,Central Michigan University | Murry B.A.,U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service | And 2 more authors.
Hydrobiologia | Year: 2016

β dissimilarity indices have described community variation occurring from unique structuring processes: species turnover and nestedness. However, the importance of scale definition remains critical and challenging during β assessments with a need for simultaneous spatial and temporal assessment to determine ecological phenomena governing biological communities. We aim to examine the contribution of turnover and nestedness structuring processes across multiple spatial and temporal scales to demonstrate the importance of scale consideration in β assessments. Using a site-to-basin-wide spatiotemporal hierarchical design, we examined diversity patterns, testing spatial, and temporal facets of β diversity structuring Laurentian Great Lake coastal wetland fish and macroinvertebrate communities from 2000 to 2012. Both fish and macroinvertebrate communities were analyzed using β dissimilarity indices under the same hierarchical design. Results indicated strong spatial and temporal turnover structuring with increasing β diversity and community turnover as scale localized. We suggest that high turnover is the result of inhospitable winter conditions followed by random re-colonization events in the spring. With relatively unique communities across space and time, biodiversity-oriented management of coastal wetlands should consider an all-inclusive approach as biodiversity hotspots are not apparent. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland


Trademark
Wenck Associates Inc. | Date: 2016-01-12

Emergency response equipment trailers.


Trademark
Wenck Associates Inc. | Date: 2014-11-25

Emergency response equipment trailers.


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Trademark
Wenck Associates Inc. | Date: 2014-11-25

Emergency response equipment trailers.


Guerra S.A.,Wenck Associates Inc | Olsen S.R.,Wenck Associates Inc | Anderson J.J.,Wenck Associates Inc
Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association | Year: 2014

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state and local agencies have focused their efforts in assessing secondary fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm; PM2.5) formation in prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) air dispersion modeling. The National Association of Clean Air Agencies (NACAA) developed a method to account for secondary PM2.5 formation by using sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) offset ratios. These ratios are used to estimate the secondary formation of sulfate and nitrate PM2.5. These ratios were first introduced by the EPA for nonattainment areas in the Implementation of the New Source Review (NSR) Program for Particulate Matter Less than 2.5 Micrometers (PM2.5), 73 FR 28321, to offset emission increases of direct PM2.5 emissions with reductions of PM2.5 precursors and vice versa. Some regulatory agencies such as the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) have developed area-specific offset ratios for SO2 and NOx based on Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) evaluations for air dispersion modeling analyses. The current study evaluates the effect on American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) predicted concentrations from the use of EPA and MPCA developed ratios. The study assesses the effect of these ratios on an electric generating utility (EGU), taconite mine, food processing plant, and a pulp and paper mill. The inputs used for these four scenarios are based on common stack parameters and emissions based on available data. The effect of background concentrations also evaluates these scenarios by presenting results based on uniform annual PM2.5 background values. This evaluation study helps assess the viability of the offset ratio method developed by NACAA in estimating primary and secondary PM2.5 concentrations. An alternative Tier 2 approach to combine modeled and monitored concentrations is also presented. On January 4, 2012, the EPA committed to engage in rulemaking to evaluate updates to the Guideline on Air Quality Models (Appendix W of 40 CFR 51) and, as appropriate, incorporate new analytical techniques or models for secondary PM2.5. As a result, the National Association of Clean Air Agencies (NACAA) developed a screening method involving offset ratios to account for secondary PM2.5 formation. The use of this method is promising to evaluate total (direct and indirect) PM2.5 impacts for permitting purposes. Therefore, the evaluation of this method is important to determine its viability for widespread use. © 2014 Copyright 2014 A&WMA.

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