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News Article | November 6, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A new imaging technique developed by scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) aims to illuminate cellular structures in deep tissue and other dense and opaque materials. Their method uses tiny particles embedded in the material, that give off laser light. The team synthesized these "laser particles" in the shape of tiny chopsticks, each measuring a small fraction of a human hair's width. The particles are made from lead iodide perovskite -- a material that is also used in solar panels, and that efficiently absorbs and traps light. When the researchers shine a laser beam at the particles, the particles light up, giving off normal, diffuse fluorescent light. But if they tune the incoming laser's power to a certain "lasing threshold," the particles will instantly generate laser light. The researchers, led by MIT graduate student Sangyeon Cho, demonstrated they were able to stimulate the particles to emit laser light, creating images at a resolution six times higher than that of current fluorescence-based microscopes. "That means that if a fluorescence microscope's resolution is set at 2 micrometers, our technique can have 300-nanometer resolution -- about a sixfold improvement over regular microscopes," Cho says. "The idea is very simple but very powerful and can be useful in many different imaging applications." Cho and his colleagues have published their results in the journal Physical Review Letters. His co-authors include Seok Hyun Yun, a professor at Harvard; Nicola Martino, a research fellow at Harvard and MGH's Wellman Center for Photomedicine; and Matjaž Humar, a researcher at the Jozef Stefan Institute. The research was done as part of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. When you shine a flashlight in a darkened room, that light appears as a relatively diffuse, hazy beam of white light, representing a jumble of different wavelengths and colors. In stark contrast, laser light is a pointedly focused, monochromatic beam of light, of a specific frequency and color. In conventional fluorescence microscopy, scientists may inject a sample of biological tissue with particles filled with fluorescent dyes. They then point a laser beam through a lens that directs the beam through the tissue, causing any fluorescent particles in its path to light up. But these particles, like microscopic flashlights, produce a relatively indistinct, fuzzy glow. If such particles were to emit more focused, laser-like light, they might produce sharper images of deep tissues and cells. In recent years, researchers have developed laser-light-emitting particles, but Cho's work is the first to apply these unique particles to imaging applications. The team first synthesized tiny, 6-micron-long nanowires from lead iodide perovskite, a material that does a good job of trapping and concentrating fluorescent light. The particles' rod-shaped geometry -- which Cho describes as "chopstick-like" -- can allow a specific wavelength of light to bounce back and forth along the particles' length, generating a standing wave, or very regular, concentrated pattern of light, similar to a laser. The researchers then built a simple optical setup, similar to conventional fluorescence microscopes, in which a laser beam is pumped from a light source, through a lens, and onto a sample platform containing the laser particles. For the most part, the researchers found that the particles emitted diffuse fluorescent light in response to the laser stimulation, similar to conventional fluorescent dyes, at low pump power. However, when they tuned the laser's power to a certain threshold, the particles lit up considerably, emitting much more laser light. Cho says that the new optical technique, which they have named LAser particle Stimulated Emission (LASE) microscopy, could be used to image a specific focal plane, or a particular layer of biological tissue. Theoretically, he says, scientists can shine a laser beam into a three-dimensional sample of tissue embedded throughout with laser particles, and use a lens to focus the beam at a specific depth. Only those particles in the beam's focus will absorb enough light or energy to turn on as lasers themselves. All other particles upstream of the path's beam should absorb less energy and only emit fluorescent light. "We can collect all this stimulated emission and can distinguish laser from fluorescent light very easily using spectrometers," Cho says. "We expect this will be very powerful when applied to biological tissue, where light normally scatters all around, and resolution is devastated. But if we use laser particles, they will be the narrow points that will emit laser light. So we can distinguish from the background and can achieve good resolution." Giuliano Scarcelli, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland, says the technique's success will hinge on successfully implementing it on a standard fluorescence microscope. Once that is achieved, laser imaging's applications, he says, are promising. "The fact that you have a laser versus fluorescence probably means you can measure deeper into tissue because you have a higher signal-to-noise ratio," says Scarcelli, who was not involved in the work. "We'll need to see in practice, but on the other hand, with optics, we have no good way of imaging deep tissue. So any research on this topic is a welcome addition." To implement this technique in living tissue, Cho says laser particles would have to be biocompatible, which lead iodide perovskite materials are not. However, the team is currently investigating ways to manipulate cells themselves to glow like lasers. "Our idea is, why not use the cell as an internal light source?" Cho says. "We're starting to think about that problem."


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A new imaging technique developed by scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) aims to illuminate cellular structures in deep tissue and other dense and opaque materials. Their method uses tiny particles embedded in the material, that give off laser light. The team synthesized these “laser particles” in the shape of tiny chopsticks, each measuring a small fraction of a human hair’s width. The particles are made from lead iodide perovskite — a material that is also used in solar panels, and that efficiently absorbs and traps light. When the researchers shine a laser beam at the particles, the particles light up, giving off normal, diffuse fluorescent light. But if they tune the incoming laser’s power to a certain “lasing threshold,” the particles will instantly generate laser light. The researchers, led by MIT graduate student Sangyeon Cho, demonstrated they were able to stimulate the particles to emit laser light, creating images at a resolution six times higher than that of current fluorescence-based microscopes. “That means that if a fluorescence microscope’s resolution is set at 2 micrometers, our technique can have 300-nanometer resolution — about a sixfold improvement over regular microscopes,” Cho said. “The idea is very simple but very powerful and can be useful in many different imaging applications.” Cho and his colleagues have published their results in the journal Physical Review Letters. His co-authors include Seok Hyun Yun, a professor at Harvard; Nicola Martino, a research fellow at Harvard and MGH’s Wellman Center for Photomedicine; and Matjaž Humar, a researcher at the Jozef Stefan Institute. The research was done as part of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. When you shine a flashlight in a darkened room, that light appears as a relatively diffuse, hazy beam of white light, representing a jumble of different wavelengths and colors. In stark contrast, laser light is a pointedly focused, monochromatic beam of light, of a specific frequency and color. In conventional fluorescence microscopy, scientists may inject a sample of biological tissue with particles filled with fluorescent dyes. They then point a laser beam through a lens that directs the beam through the tissue, causing any fluorescent particles in its path to light up. But these particles, like microscopic flashlights, produce a relatively indistinct, fuzzy glow. If such particles were to emit more focused, laser-like light, they might produce sharper images of deep tissues and cells. In recent years, researchers have developed laser-light-emitting particles, but Cho’s work is the first to apply these unique particles to imaging applications. The team first synthesized tiny, 6-micron-long nanowires from lead iodide perovskite, a material that does a good job of trapping and concentrating fluorescent light. The particles’ rod-shaped geometry — which Cho describes as “chopstick-like” — can allow a specific wavelength of light to bounce back and forth along the particles’ length, generating a standing wave, or very regular, concentrated pattern of light, similar to a laser. The researchers then built a simple optical setup, similar to conventional fluorescence microscopes, in which a laser beam is pumped from a light source, through a lens, and onto a sample platform containing the laser particles. For the most part, the researchers found that the particles emitted diffuse fluorescent light in response to the laser stimulation, similar to conventional fluorescent dyes, at low pump power. However, when they tuned the laser’s power to a certain threshold, the particles lit up considerably, emitting much more laser light. Cho said that the new optical technique, which they have named LAser particle Stimulated Emission (LASE) microscopy, could be used to image a specific focal plane, or a particular layer of biological tissue. Theoretically, he said, scientists can shine a laser beam into a three-dimensional sample of tissue embedded throughout with laser particles, and use a lens to focus the beam at a specific depth. Only those particles in the beam’s focus will absorb enough light or energy to turn on as lasers themselves. All other particles upstream of the path’s beam should absorb less energy and only emit fluorescent light. “We can collect all this stimulated emission and can distinguish laser from fluorescent light very easily using spectrometers,” Cho said. “We expect this will be very powerful when applied to biological tissue, where light normally scatters all around, and resolution is devastated. But if we use laser particles, they will be the narrow points that will emit laser light. So we can distinguish from the background and can achieve good resolution.” Giuliano Scarcelli, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland, said the technique’s success will hinge on successfully implementing it on a standard fluorescence microscope. Once that is achieved, laser imaging’s applications, he says, are promising. “The fact that you have a laser versus fluorescence probably means you can measure deeper into tissue because you have a higher signal-to-noise ratio,” said Scarcelli, who was not involved in the work. “We’ll need to see in practice, but on the other hand, with optics, we have no good way of imaging deep tissue. So any research on this topic is a welcome addition.” To implement this technique in living tissue, Cho said laser particles would have to be biocompatible, which lead iodide perovskite materials are not. However, the team is currently investigating ways to manipulate cells themselves to glow like lasers. “Our idea is, why not use the cell as an internal light source?” Cho said. “We’re starting to think about that problem.”


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

A new imaging technique developed by scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) aims to illuminate cellular structures in deep tissue and other dense and opaque materials. Their method uses tiny particles embedded in the material, that give off laser light. The team synthesized these “laser particles” in the shape of tiny chopsticks, each measuring a small fraction of a human hair’s width. The particles are made from lead iodide perovskite — a material that is also used in solar panels, and that efficiently absorbs and traps light. When the researchers shine a laser beam at the particles, the particles light up, giving off normal, diffuse fluorescent light. But if they tune the incoming laser’s power to a certain “lasing threshold,” the particles will instantly generate laser light. The researchers, led by MIT graduate student Sangyeon Cho, demonstrated they were able to stimulate the particles to emit laser light, creating images at a resolution six times higher than that of current fluorescence-based microscopes. “That means that if a fluorescence microscope’s resolution is set at 2 micrometers, our technique can have 300-nanometer resolution — about a sixfold improvement over regular microscopes,” Cho says. “The idea is very simple but very powerful and can be useful in many different imaging applications.” Cho and his colleagues have published their results in the journal Physical Review Letters. His co-authors include Seok Hyun Yun, a professor at Harvard; Nicola Martino, a research fellow at Harvard and MGH’s Wellman Center for Photomedicine; and Matjaž Humar, a researcher at the Jozef Stefan Institute. The research was done as part of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. When you shine a flashlight in a darkened room, that light appears as a relatively diffuse, hazy beam of white light, representing a jumble of different wavelengths and colors. In stark contrast, laser light is a pointedly focused, monochromatic beam of light, of a specific frequency and color. In conventional fluorescence microscopy, scientists may inject a sample of biological tissue with particles filled with fluorescent dyes. They then point a laser beam through a lens that directs the beam through the tissue, causing any fluorescent particles in its path to light up. But these particles, like microscopic flashlights, produce a relatively indistinct, fuzzy glow. If such particles were to emit more focused, laser-like light, they might produce sharper images of deep tissues and cells. In recent years, researchers have developed laser-light-emitting particles, but Cho’s work is the first to apply these unique particles to imaging applications. The team first synthesized tiny, 6-micron-long nanowires from lead iodide perovskite, a material that does a good job of trapping and concentrating fluorescent light. The particles’ rod-shaped geometry — which Cho describes as “chopstick-like” — can allow a specific wavelength of light to bounce back and forth along the particles’ length, generating a standing wave, or very regular, concentrated pattern of light, similar to a laser. The researchers then built a simple optical setup, similar to conventional fluorescence microscopes, in which a laser beam is pumped from a light source, through a lens, and onto a sample platform containing the laser particles. For the most part, the researchers found that the particles emitted diffuse fluorescent light in response to the laser stimulation, similar to conventional fluorescent dyes, at low pump power. However, when they tuned the laser’s power to a certain threshold, the particles lit up considerably, emitting much more laser light. Cho says that the new optical technique, which they have named LAser particle Stimulated Emission (LASE) microscopy, could be used to image a specific focal plane, or a particular layer of biological tissue. Theoretically, he says, scientists can shine a laser beam into a three-dimensional sample of tissue embedded throughout with laser particles, and use a lens to focus the beam at a specific depth. Only those particles in the beam’s focus will absorb enough light or energy to turn on as lasers themselves. All other particles upstream of the path’s beam should absorb less energy and only emit fluorescent light. “We can collect all this stimulated emission and can distinguish laser from fluorescent light very easily using spectrometers,” Cho says. “We expect this will be very powerful when applied to biological tissue, where light normally scatters all around, and resolution is devastated. But if we use laser particles, they will be the narrow points that will emit laser light. So we can distinguish from the background and can achieve good resolution.” Giuliano Scarcelli, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland, says the technique’s success will hinge on successfully implementing it on a standard fluorescence microscope. Once that is achieved, laser imaging’s applications, he says, are promising. “The fact that you have a laser versus fluorescence probably means you can measure deeper into tissue because you have a higher signal-to-noise ratio,” says Scarcelli, who was not involved in the work. “We’ll need to see in practice, but on the other hand, with optics, we have no good way of imaging deep tissue. So any research on this topic is a welcome addition.” To implement this technique in living tissue, Cho says laser particles would have to be biocompatible, which lead iodide perovskite materials are not. However, the team is currently investigating ways to manipulate cells themselves to glow like lasers. “Our idea is, why not use the cell as an internal light source?” Cho says. “We’re starting to think about that problem.”


The team synthesized these "laser particles" in the shape of tiny chopsticks, each measuring a small fraction of a human hair's width. The particles are made from lead iodide perovskite—a material that is also used in solar panels, and that efficiently absorbs and traps light. When the researchers shine a laser beam at the particles, the particles light up, giving off normal, diffuse fluorescent light. But if they tune the incoming laser's power to a certain "lasing threshold," the particles will instantly generate laser light. The researchers, led by MIT graduate student Sangyeon Cho, demonstrated they were able to stimulate the particles to emit laser light, creating images at a resolution six times higher than that of current fluorescence-based microscopes. "That means that if a fluorescence microscope's resolution is set at 2 micrometers, our technique can have 300-nanometer resolution—about a sixfold improvement over regular microscopes," Cho says. "The idea is very simple but very powerful and can be useful in many different imaging applications." Cho and his colleagues have published their results in the journal Physical Review Letters. His co-authors include Seok Hyun Yun, a professor at Harvard; Nicola Martino, a research fellow at Harvard and MGH's Wellman Center for Photomedicine; and Matjaž Humar, a researcher at the Jozef Stefan Institute. The research was done as part of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. When you shine a flashlight in a darkened room, that light appears as a relatively diffuse, hazy beam of white light, representing a jumble of different wavelengths and colors. In stark contrast, laser light is a pointedly focused, monochromatic beam of light, of a specific frequency and color. In conventional fluorescence microscopy, scientists may inject a sample of biological tissue with particles filled with fluorescent dyes. They then point a laser beam through a lens that directs the beam through the tissue, causing any fluorescent particles in its path to light up. But these particles, like microscopic flashlights, produce a relatively indistinct, fuzzy glow. If such particles were to emit more focused, laser-like light, they might produce sharper images of deep tissues and cells. In recent years, researchers have developed laser-light-emitting particles, but Cho's work is the first to apply these unique particles to imaging applications. The team first synthesized tiny, 6-micron-long nanowires from lead iodide perovskite, a material that does a good job of trapping and concentrating fluorescent light. The particles' rod-shaped geometry—which Cho describes as "chopstick-like"—can allow a specific wavelength of light to bounce back and forth along the particles' length, generating a standing wave, or very regular, concentrated pattern of light, similar to a laser. The researchers then built a simple optical setup, similar to conventional fluorescence microscopes, in which a laser beam is pumped from a light source, through a lens, and onto a sample platform containing the laser particles. For the most part, the researchers found that the particles emitted diffuse fluorescent light in response to the laser stimulation, similar to conventional fluorescent dyes, at low pump power. However, when they tuned the laser's power to a certain threshold, the particles lit up considerably, emitting much more laser light. Cho says that the new optical technique, which they have named LAser particle Stimulated Emission (LASE) microscopy, could be used to image a specific focal plane, or a particular layer of biological tissue. Theoretically, he says, scientists can shine a laser beam into a three-dimensional sample of tissue embedded throughout with laser particles, and use a lens to focus the beam at a specific depth. Only those particles in the beam's focus will absorb enough light or energy to turn on as lasers themselves. All other particles upstream of the path's beam should absorb less energy and only emit fluorescent light. "We can collect all this stimulated emission and can distinguish laser from fluorescent light very easily using spectrometers," Cho says. "We expect this will be very powerful when applied to biological tissue, where light normally scatters all around, and resolution is devastated. But if we use laser particles, they will be the narrow points that will emit laser light. So we can distinguish from the background and can achieve good resolution." Giuliano Scarcelli, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland, says the technique's success will hinge on successfully implementing it on a standard fluorescence microscope. Once that is achieved, laser imaging's applications, he says, are promising. "The fact that you have a laser versus fluorescence probably means you can measure deeper into tissue because you have a higher signal-to-noise ratio," says Scarcelli, who was not involved in the work. "We'll need to see in practice, but on the other hand, with optics, we have no good way of imaging deep tissue. So any research on this topic is a welcome addition." To implement this technique in living tissue, Cho says laser particles would have to be biocompatible, which lead iodide perovskite materials are not. However, the team is currently investigating ways to manipulate cells themselves to glow like lasers. "Our idea is, why not use the cell as an internal light source?" Cho says. "We're starting to think about that problem." Explore further: Jellyfish proteins used to create polariton laser


Home > Press > Laser particles could provide sharper images of tissues: New imaging technique stimulates particles to emit laser light, could create higher-resolution images Abstract: A new imaging technique developed by scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) aims to illuminate cellular structures in deep tissue and other dense and opaque materials. Their method uses tiny particles embedded in the material, that give off laser light. The team synthesized these “laser particles” in the shape of tiny chopsticks, each measuring a small fraction of a human hair’s width. The particles are made from lead iodide perovskite — a material that is also used in solar panels, and that efficiently absorbs and traps light. When the researchers shine a laser beam at the particles, the particles light up, giving off normal, diffuse fluorescent light. But if they tune the incoming laser’s power to a certain “lasing threshold,” the particles will instantly generate laser light. The researchers, led by MIT graduate student Sangyeon Cho, demonstrated they were able to stimulate the particles to emit laser light, creating images at a resolution six times higher than that of current fluorescence-based microscopes. “That means that if a fluorescence microscope’s resolution is set at 2 micrometers, our technique can have 300-nanometer resolution — about a sixfold improvement over regular microscopes,” Cho says. “The idea is very simple but very powerful and can be useful in many different imaging applications.” Cho and his colleagues have published their results in the journal Physical Review Letters. His co-authors include Seok Hyun Yun, a professor at Harvard; Nicola Martino, a research fellow at Harvard and MGH’s Wellman Center for Photomedicine; and Matjaž Humar, a researcher at the Jozef Stefan Institute. The research was done as part of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. A light in the dark When you shine a flashlight in a darkened room, that light appears as a relatively diffuse, hazy beam of white light, representing a jumble of different wavelengths and colors. In stark contrast, laser light is a pointedly focused, monochromatic beam of light, of a specific frequency and color. In conventional fluorescence microscopy, scientists may inject a sample of biological tissue with particles filled with fluorescent dyes. They then point a laser beam through a lens that directs the beam through the tissue, causing any fluorescent particles in its path to light up. But these particles, like microscopic flashlights, produce a relatively indistinct, fuzzy glow. If such particles were to emit more focused, laser-like light, they might produce sharper images of deep tissues and cells. In recent years, researchers have developed laser-light-emitting particles, but Cho’s work is the first to apply these unique particles to imaging applications. Chopstick lasers The team first synthesized tiny, 6-micron-long nanowires from lead iodide perovskite, a material that does a good job of trapping and concentrating fluorescent light. The particles’ rod-shaped geometry — which Cho describes as “chopstick-like” — can allow a specific wavelength of light to bounce back and forth along the particles’ length, generating a standing wave, or very regular, concentrated pattern of light, similar to a laser. The researchers then built a simple optical setup, similar to conventional fluorescence microscopes, in which a laser beam is pumped from a light source, through a lens, and onto a sample platform containing the laser particles. For the most part, the researchers found that the particles emitted diffuse fluorescent light in response to the laser stimulation, similar to conventional fluorescent dyes, at low pump power. However, when they tuned the laser’s power to a certain threshold, the particles lit up considerably, emitting much more laser light. Cho says that the new optical technique, which they have named LAser particle Stimulated Emission (LASE) microscopy, could be used to image a specific focal plane, or a particular layer of biological tissue. Theoretically, he says, scientists can shine a laser beam into a three-dimensional sample of tissue embedded throughout with laser particles, and use a lens to focus the beam at a specific depth. Only those particles in the beam’s focus will absorb enough light or energy to turn on as lasers themselves. All other particles upstream of the path’s beam should absorb less energy and only emit fluorescent light. “We can collect all this stimulated emission and can distinguish laser from fluorescent light very easily using spectrometers,” Cho says. “We expect this will be very powerful when applied to biological tissue, where light normally scatters all around, and resolution is devastated. But if we use laser particles, they will be the narrow points that will emit laser light. So we can distinguish from the background and can achieve good resolution.” Giuliano Scarcelli, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland, says the technique’s success will hinge on successfully implementing it on a standard fluorescence microscope. Once that is achieved, laser imaging’s applications, he says, are promising. “The fact that you have a laser versus fluorescence probably means you can measure deeper into tissue because you have a higher signal-to-noise ratio,” says Scarcelli, who was not involved in the work. “We’ll need to see in practice, but on the other hand, with optics, we have no good way of imaging deep tissue. So any research on this topic is a welcome addition.” To implement this technique in living tissue, Cho says laser particles would have to be biocompatible, which lead iodide perovskite materials are not. However, the team is currently investigating ways to manipulate cells themselves to glow like lasers. “Our idea is, why not use the cell as an internal light source?” Cho says. “We’re starting to think about that problem.” For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

According to Stratistics MRC, the Global Photomedicine Market is accounted for $313.23 million in 2015 and is expected to reach $426.89 million by 2022 growing at a CAGR of 4.5% during the forecast period. Growing geriatric population and rising awareness for beauty are some of the factors boosting the market growth. However, huge costs and product safety concerns are anticipated to hamper the market growth. By application, Oncology segment is anticipated to witness significant growth during the forecast period owing to rising prevalence of cancer worldwide. By region, North America commanded the largest share in the global market due to increased desire to retain youth and beauty among population. However, emerging markets such as Brazil, India, Germany, Saudi Arabia and China are anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR due to demand for new therapies for body contouring and other medical conditions. Some of the key players in Photomedicine market include Abbott Medical Optics Inc., Novartis, Philips, BIOLITEC, THOR Photomedicine Ltd, Quantel medical, Alma Lasers, Ltd., IRIDEX, QBMI PhotoMedicine, Switch Biotech, Syneron Medical Ltd., AngioDynamics, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Spectranetics, Lumenis Ltd., Pfizer Inc., Colorado Skin & Vein and PhotoMedex. Technologies Covered: • Dichroic Lamps       • Lasers • Full Spectrum Light • Light-Emitting Diodes • Polychromatic Polarized Light • Fluorescent Lamps Applications Covered: • Pain Management • Dental Procedures • Dermatology o Skin Resurfacing o Hair Removal o Tattoo Removal • Optical Diagnostics • Wound Healing • Oncology • Other Applications Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK  o Spain o Rest of Europe       • Asia Pacific o Japan        o China        o India        o Australia        o New Zealand       o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil       o Argentina        o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements


— Growing geriatric population and rising awareness for beauty are some of the factors boosting the market growth. However, huge costs and product safety concerns are anticipated to hamper the market growth. By application, Oncology segment is anticipated to witness significant growth during the forecast period owing to rising prevalence of cancer worldwide. By region, North America commanded the largest share in the global market due to increased desire to retain youth and beauty among population. However, emerging markets such as Brazil, India, Germany, Saudi Arabia and China are anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR due to demand for new therapies for body contouring and other medical conditions. Some of the key players in Photomedicine market include Abbott Medical Optics Inc., Novartis, Philips, BIOLITEC, THOR Photomedicine Ltd, Quantel medical, Alma Lasers, Ltd., IRIDEX, QBMI PhotoMedicine, Switch Biotech, Syneron Medical Ltd., AngioDynamics, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Spectranetics, Lumenis Ltd., Pfizer Inc., Colorado Skin & Vein and PhotoMedex. Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK o Spain o Rest of Europe • Asia Pacific o Japan o China o India o Australia o New Zealand o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil o Argentina o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements About Stratistics MRC We offer wide spectrum of research and consulting services with in-depth knowledge of different industries. We are known for customized research services, consulting services and Full Time Equivalent (FTE) services in the research world. We explore the market trends and draw our insights with valid assessments and analytical views. We use advanced techniques and tools among the quantitative and qualitative methodologies to identify the market trends. Our research reports and publications are routed to help our clients to design their business models and enhance their business growth in the competitive market scenario. We have a strong team with hand-picked consultants including project managers, implementers, industry experts, researchers, research evaluators and analysts with years of experience in delivering the complex projects. For more information, please visit http://www.strategymrc.com/


Melanoma in skin biopsy with H&E stain — this case may represent superficial spreading melanoma. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, with over 232,000 new cases and 55,000 deaths per year worldwide. Those with light-skin or red hair are often prone to hard-to-detect melanomas, often caused by properties of pigments within skin called melanins. People with fair skin have a higher concentration of the melanin known as pheomelanin in their skin, and a corresponding higher probability of developing melanoma—in particular, a difficult-to-detect subtype known as amelanotic melanoma. In high concentrations, pheomelanin is responsible for the orange-reddishness in hair, but is essentially invisible in skin. While eumelanin, the brown-black pigment found in most melanomas, can be easily seen, the light colored pheomelanin is difficult to detect; even with advances in modern microscopy, understanding the pheomelanin molecule and its role in melanoma has eluded scientists. Recently, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital's Wellman Center for Photomedicine have made a breakthrough for spotting and studying this elusive molecule in skin. Sam Osseiran, a scientist on the team lead by Harvard University professor Conor Evans, will present their findings at the OSA Biophotonics Congress: Optics in the Life Sciences meeting, held 2-5 April in San Diego, California, USA. The Evans group's research centers around the use of a high-resolution imaging technique called coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scatterings (CARS) microscopy, a variant of the more widely used Raman spectroscopy that enables chemically-specific imaging by means of detecting molecular vibrations. Evans, whose translational research group specializes in microscopy and spectroscopy for understanding cancer and dermatology afflictions, says the common assumption about locating and imaging pheomelanin is that "there's really no good way to see this mostly invisible pigment when it occurs in skin." But Massachusetts General's chief of dermatology, David Fischer, approached Evans and they decided to collaborate. Evans' research team took on the pheomelanin imaging challenge. "So my team put our heads together, scouring for ways to see it," Evans said. While another optical technology, called transient absorption microscopy, does offer possibilities for studying pheomelanin, this method is complex and does not easily lend itself to clinical practice. "We started to look through the Raman literature," Evans said. "Raman spectroscopy is a very mature technique that allows you to detect molecules by their unique chemical vibrations, which are themselves derived from the structure of the molecules. CARS microscopy is a coherent Raman tool that is akin to using a tuning fork to specifically detect molecular structures." Fortunately, CARS microscopy proved successful for imaging pheomelanin. "Pheomelanin has a unique chemical structure, there is nothing else like it in the body," Evans said. "So, we started to look at the molecular structure and noticed there was a corresponding unique molecular vibration that might be useful for imaging the pigment with CARS microscopy." Evans gives much of the credit to his research team, Sam Osseiran and post-doctoral researcher Tracy Wang, for leading the way in developing and refining the CARS microscopy method for imaging pheomelanin. In general, CARS microscopy utilizes two lasers focused on a sample whose energy difference is "tuned" to specific molecular vibrations to generate high resolution imaging information. "The work led by Tracy was really rather novel application of CARS microscopy to target this biomolecule which no one else has tried to do before," Osseiran said. "We adjusted our system and aligned and tuned everything so that we could specifically target this one melanin pigment, pheomelanin." Serendipitously, while developing their CARS imaging method, the group found a complementary method that could be used for the simultaneous detection of eumelanin called sum-frequency absorption (SFA) microscopy. SFA makes use of a signal modulation scheme that can detect both species of melanin. This additional imaging tool is important, as most humans produce both species within skin, making mapping the distribution and quantity of both pigments important. "Sum-frequency absorption imaging allows you to visualize where all the melanin absorbers are within tissue," said Evans. "As both CARS and SFA can be carried out at the same time, these two techniques can be used together to simultaneously image both melanin pigments." Wang and Osseiran believe their CARS and SFA method could be very helpful for future research on melanoma and its treatment, as well as observing the changes that occur with melanin species in different states. "We are adding another tool to our utility belt here in our investigations of melanoma," Osseiran said. The study's original motivator, David Fischer, believes that a very important benefit of the work might be its potential role in diagnosing cancer. "This may offer a brand-new tool for early diagnosis for some of the most lethal melanomas, possibly at a stage when they might still be curable," said Fisher. "Time and time again, it is proven that early diagnosis saves lives."


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers have recently refined a classic Raman-based technique and succeeded in imaging the two dominant melanin molecules -- a breakthrough that could lead to new understandings and, critically, early detection of melanoma SAN DIEGO -- Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, with over 232,000 new cases and 55,000 deaths per year worldwide. Those with light-skin or red hair are often prone to hard-to-detect melanomas, often caused by properties of pigments within skin called melanins. People with fair skin have a higher concentration of the melanin known as pheomelanin in their skin, and a corresponding higher probability of developing melanoma -- in particular, a difficult-to-detect subtype known as amelanotic melanoma. In high concentrations, pheomelanin is responsible for the orange-reddishness in hair, but is essentially invisible in skin. While eumelanin, the brown-black pigment found in most melanomas, can be easily seen, the light colored pheomelanin is difficult to detect; even with advances in modern microscopy, understanding the pheomelanin molecule and its role in melanoma has eluded scientists. Recently, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital's Wellman Center for Photomedicine have made a breakthrough for spotting and studying this elusive molecule in skin. Sam Osseiran, a scientist on the team lead by Harvard University professor Conor Evans, will present their findings at the OSA Biophotonics Congress: Optics in the Life Sciences meeting, held 2-5 April in San Diego, California, USA. The Evans group's research centers around the use of a high-resolution imaging technique called coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scatterings (CARS) microscopy, a variant of the more widely used Raman spectroscopy that enables chemically-specific imaging by means of detecting molecular vibrations. Evans, whose translational research group specializes in microscopy and spectroscopy for understanding cancer and dermatology afflictions, says the common assumption about locating and imaging pheomelanin is that "there's really no good way to see this mostly invisible pigment when it occurs in skin." But Massachusetts General's chief of dermatology, David Fischer, approached Evans and they decided to collaborate. Evans' research team took on the pheomelanin imaging challenge. "So my team put our heads together, scouring for ways to see it," Evans said. While another optical technology, called transient absorption microscopy, does offer possibilities for studying pheomelanin, this method is complex and does not easily lend itself to clinical practice. "We started to look through the Raman literature," Evans said. "Raman spectroscopy is a very mature technique that allows you to detect molecules by their unique chemical vibrations, which are themselves derived from the structure of the molecules. CARS microscopy is a coherent Raman tool that is akin to using a tuning fork to specifically detect molecular structures." Fortunately, CARS microscopy proved successful for imaging pheomelanin. "Pheomelanin has a unique chemical structure, there is nothing else like it in the body," Evans said. "So, we started to look at the molecular structure and noticed there was a corresponding unique molecular vibration that might be useful for imaging the pigment with CARS microscopy." Evans gives much of the credit to his research team, Sam Osseiran and post-doctoral researcher Tracy Wang, for leading the way in developing and refining the CARS microscopy method for imaging pheomelanin. In general, CARS microscopy utilizes two lasers focused on a sample whose energy difference is "tuned" to specific molecular vibrations to generate high resolution imaging information. "The work led by Tracy was really rather novel application of CARS microscopy to target this biomolecule which no one else has tried to do before," Osseiran said. "We adjusted our system and aligned and tuned everything so that we could specifically target this one melanin pigment, pheomelanin." Serendipitously, while developing their CARS imaging method, the group found a complementary method that could be used for the simultaneous detection of eumelanin called sum-frequency absorption (SFA) microscopy. SFA makes use of a signal modulation scheme that can detect both species of melanin. This additional imaging tool is important, as most humans produce both species within skin, making mapping the distribution and quantity of both pigments important. "Sum-frequency absorption imaging allows you to visualize where all the melanin absorbers are within tissue," said Evans. "As both CARS and SFA can be carried out at the same time, these two techniques can be used together to simultaneously image both melanin pigments." Wang and Osseiran believe their CARS and SFA method could be very helpful for future research on melanoma and its treatment, as well as observing the changes that occur with melanin species in different states. "We are adding another tool to our utility belt here in our investigations of melanoma," Osseiran said. The study's original motivator, David Fischer, believes that a very important benefit of the work might be its potential role in diagnosing cancer. "This may offer a brand-new tool for early diagnosis for some of the most lethal melanomas, possibly at a stage when they might still be curable," said Fisher. "Time and time again, it is proven that early diagnosis saves lives." Conference registration is open! Register before 2 March 2017 and save on a full technical conference pass. Credentialed media and analysts who wish to cover OSA Biophotonics can submit a form to register for a full-access conference media badge. Registration, travel information and exhibitor news can be found in the BioPhotonics Media Room. Postdeadline papers will be accepted until 14 March 2017. Submission details are available on the OSA BioPhotonics Conference website: Paper submission. ,p>Founded in 1916, The Optical Society (OSA) is the leading professional organization for scientists, engineers, students and business leaders who fuel discoveries, shape real-life applications and accelerate achievements in the science of light. Through world-renowned publications, meetings and membership initiatives, OSA provides quality research, inspired interactions and dedicated resources for its extensive global network of optics and photonics experts. For more information, visit: osa.org/100.


Flash Physics is our daily pick of the latest need-to-know developments from the global physics community selected by Physics World's team of editors and reporters A new high-resolution map of dark matter – an invisible substance that appears to have a profound gravitational effect on galaxies and other large-scale structures in the cosmos – has been produced by an international team of astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope. The map focuses on three galaxy clusters that act as cosmic telescopes by magnifying images of the more distant universe through gravitational lensing. The degree to which this magnification occurs gives an extremely precise measurement of the dark matter within the clusters. "We have mapped all of the clumps of dark matter that the data permit us to detect, and have produced the most detailed topological map of the dark-matter landscape to date," explains Priyamvada Natarajan of Yale University in the US, who led the team. An important feature of the map is that it is in close agreement with computer simulations of how cold dark matter (CDM) – a popular theoretical description of dark matter – is expected to be distributed within the galaxy clusters. The map is described in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. A hard-to-detect pigment in melanoma skin cancer can be imaged using a laser-based technique. A team at Massachusetts General Hospital's Wellman Center for Photomedicine in the US has used a form of Raman spectroscopy to identify the pheomelanin molecule. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and fair skin has a higher probability of developing the hard-to-detect variation of the disease called amelanotic melanoma. This is linked to the fact that fair skin contains a higher concentration of pheomelanin – a pigment, or melanin, within the skin. While the black-brown pigment found in most melanomas is easily observed, pheomelanin is essentially invisible. To detect the pigment, the team, led by Conor Evans, turned to a form of Raman spectroscopy called coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a well-known technique that uses lasers to measure the unique chemical vibrations within molecules and hence identify them. CARS microscopy meanwhile, is a high-resolution imaging technique. It focuses two lasers on a sample and "tunes" the energy difference to specific molecular vibrations. This means a high-resolution image can be generated. Using CARS, the researchers successfully imaged the usually invisible pheomelanin by looking for its unique chemical structure. The method could be incorporated into a brand-new tool for early cancer diagnosis. The work will be presented at the OSA Biophotonics Congress: Optics in the Life Sciences meeting on 2–5 April in San Diego, US. It has also been described in Scientific Reports. A connection between the sudden outflows of gas from a supermassive black hole and X-ray bursts has been made by astronomers using two space telescopes – NASA's NuSTAR and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. Gas outflows are common features of supermassive black holes, which sit at the centre of large galaxies. These objects ingest vast amounts of material and the dynamics of this accretion process can lead to the ejection of gas in a burp-like ultrafast wind. The team trained the instruments on an outflow from the black hole at the centre of galaxy IRAS 13224-3809 and observed that the temperature of an outflow was changing much more rapidly than had previously been seen in other events – on a timescale of less than 1 h. According to team member Erin Kara of the University of Maryland, these fluctuations provide important clues about where the outflow was created. "Because we saw such rapid variability in the winds, we know that the emission is coming from very close to the black hole itself, and because we observed that the wind was also changing on rapid timescales, it must also be coming from very close to the black hole." The observations were made over several days and revealed that the temperature fluctuations were a response to changes in the intensity of X-rays emitted by the black hole. This information could provide important clues about where the X-rays and outflows are produced. The research is described in Nature.

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