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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

GREENWICH, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Wellfleet Credit Partners (“Wellfleet”) announced today the closing of a $457.8 million collateralized loan obligation (“CLO”), referred to as “Wellfleet CLO 2017-1.” Wellfleet CLO 2017-1 represents the fourth CLO issuance for Wellfleet, the performing credit business of Littlejohn & Co., LLC (“Littlejohn”), a private investment firm. Benefitting from supportive market conditions and investor receptivity, CLO 2017-1 was upsized approximately $50.0 million during marketing. With the completion of this CLO, Wellfleet is managing four CLOs that total over $1.5 billion in aggregate. The Wellfleet platform has completed four CLOs in the past 20 months. The CLO will be backed by a diversified portfolio of broadly syndicated senior secured loans. Five classes of notes rated Aaa through Ba3 by Moody’s and one class of notes rated AAA by Fitch totaling $414.2 million were placed. In addition to several non-affiliated investors, Littlejohn funds, as well as its partners, invested in the CLO. The CLO vehicle will have a two-year non-call and a four-year reinvestment period with a final maturity of 12 years. Wellfleet will retain equity through a majority-owned affiliate in order to comply with U.S. risk retention requirements. Scott McKay, Wellfleet Portfolio Manager, stated, “We are appreciative of the support that the transaction received from our existing investors, and that we also added many new investors across the capital structure. With this CLO, Wellfleet was able to draw upon a global investor base.” Wellfleet Credit Partners was established in 2015 as part of the Littlejohn Debt Management business. Dennis Talley, Wellfleet Portfolio Manager, commented, “We are pleased that we have navigated varying market environments to both invest in underlying credits, as well as to be a consistent issuer of new CLO vehicles. We look forward to continuing to grow the Wellfleet business.” Citigroup Global Markets acted as the arranger for the CLO. Dechert LLP acted as legal advisor to Wellfleet. The securities offered in the CLO have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or any state securities laws, and may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or pursuant to an exemption from the registration under the Securities Act and applicable state securities laws. This release does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any such securities. Littlejohn & Co. is a Greenwich, Connecticut-based deep-value, special situations investor investing in middle-market companies through all economic cycles. The firm makes a broad range of equity and debt investments in undervalued companies that can benefit from Littlejohn’s operational and strategic approach. For more information, visit www.littlejohnllc.com.


"Navigating Indieworld," by Julie Gerber and Carole P. Roman is recipient of Reader Views 2016-2017 Literary Awards for First Place in Best Writing/Publishing category and The Book By Book Publicity award for Best Writing/Publishing Book of the Year. -- In "Navigating Indieworld,"self-help experts Julie A. Gerber and Carole P. Roman share their vast experience in a comprehensive, easy-to-read guide that takes new independent authors from their first draft, through publication and into the world of marketing.Concisely written chapters cover the entire process of the self-publishing journey in an organized, chronological format. Topics such as the importance of beta readers, the editing process, choosing an illustrator, formatting, and the best tools to use, guide authors through what can seem like an overwhelming journey to publication. But, it doesn't stop there – after publication it's on to marketing and publicity, with invaluable information about Amazon and Goodreads, book reviews, and social media, The author's share what worked for them, give insight into the costs of different services and provide real-life examples complete with websites to check out for promoting purposes. Also included is a complete directory by topic that lists organizations, reviewers, blogs, and publications mentioned throughout the book.Managing Editor for Reader Views, Susan Violante proclaimed "Navigating Indieworld" to be a "must-have" publication for upcoming and experienced Indie authors alike, stating, "I actually wish this book had been published when I first started. It would have saved me a lot of headaches and tough learning lessons!"  The other judges of the 2016/2017 Literary Awards obviously agreed with that sentiment, awarding "Navigating Indieworld" with First Place in the Writing and Publishing category as well as the Book By Book Publicity Award for the Best Writing/Publishing Book of the Year.is the award-winning author of forty books. She has found a second, third, and fourth career in writing, marketing, and publicizing her books and those of her author sons, Michael Phillip Cash and Eric Jay Cash. Both her Captain No Beard series and If You Were Me and Lived In… series have received multiple awards including the Kirkus Star of Exceptional Merit, Kirkus Reviews Best, the NABE Pinnacle Award, ERIK Award for 2013, Foreword Reviews Five Star and Finalist in the Book of the Year, and Reader's Views Children's Book of the Year. Carole has a radio show on Pod Fire Radio called Let's Say Hello To Our Neighbors. She and a few colleagues recently started a new magazine with Magster called Indie Authors Monthly, which focuses on connecting readers with new Indie Authors. Carole and Julie have an upcoming radio show called Navigating Indieworld, due to air in early June. Carole lives on Long Island, New York, with her husband and near her children and grandchildren.is the founder of Away We Go Media, a social media management and consulting firm for authors. She is also a blogger at All The Hits and Misses, Executive Vice President/Business Manager at TopShelf Magazine, Assistant Publisher/Director of Social Media at TopShelf Indie Authors & Books, and co-author of Tortured Souls: The House On Wellfleet Bluffs. Julie can usually be found refereeing her sons, or glued to her desktop as she works from home. She lives in Georgia with her husband, two kids, and her little sidekick, a doting Pekingese rescue named Abby.For more information on Navigating Indieworld (ISBN 9781537228068, CreateSpace, 2016) visit, https://www.awaywegomedia.com Publicity contact is https://www.ReaderViews.com . Review copies available to the media upon request.


News Article | May 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Massachusetts Cultural Council Board of Directors voted today to name Provincetown a Massachusetts Cultural District. The designation celebrates Provincetown’s long history as a center of iconoclastic art, entertainment, natural beauty and heritage. The Provincetown district is named the Art, Culture & Heritage District. It will begin at Pilgrims’ First Landing Park and run the length of Commercial Street before ending at Snail Road. The distinction will enhance the visitor and resident experience. It includes architectural and historic sites as well as 60 art galleries, three museums, eight performance venues, plus memorial and cultural attractions. Some highlights are historic homes along Commercial Street, Pilgrims’ First Landing Park, Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, The Fine Arts Work Center, and the Provincetown Theater. “The Provincetown Cultural District is a tremendous opportunity to bring our cultural community together. The arts, culture and heritage organizations of the Town continuously work to preserve the history, share what’s new and promote their uniqueness. This designation provides a welcome joint venture by packaging our local arts, humanities and science organizations with the Mass Cultural Council. Local residents will benefit in new and enhanced economic development and visitors will find expanded services during their stay in Provincetown,” said Provincetown Town Manager, David Panagore. The Council launched the initiative in 2011 after state legislature passed a bill approving it the previous year. Cultural districts are meant to help local artists and organizations produce cultural programs. These bursts of creativity help to create an enticing place for visitors of the cultural districts. The Provincetown Cultural District designation will help establish the area as a tourist destination with a unique history. Provincetown is considered America’s oldest continuous art colony and maintains the heritage of America’s LGBTQ+ community whose vibrant spirit entices visitors far and wide to explore, create, and learn 365 days of the year. Anthony Fuccillo, Director of Tourism for Provincetown said, “We are happy to receive the Cultural District designation. Cultural Tourism has grown to be one of the top reasons for travel and Arts, Culture and Heritage are part of the tapestry of the Town. When planning a road trip vacation there is an entire chain of Mass Cultural Districts along the Cape and the Islands from Plymouth to Provincetown, there are nine districts to visit, Plymouth Bay, Sandwich, Hyannis, Barnstable Village, Orleans, Wellfleet and Provincetown, with two more on Nantucket and the Vineyard.” The Cultural District designation will give Provincetown access to a grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council Board as well as potential operational grants, and donations from other departments within the Commonwealth. The Council will also include Provincetown in their Cultural District marketing campaign. The designation of Provincetown as a cultural district is part of a larger vision to continue to promote Provincetown as a robust cultural experience and enhance Provincetown’s economy and the quality of life for visitors and residents. The Provincetown cultural experience would focus on wayfinding, compelling storytelling and distribution of useful information and services. The concept includes traditional signs, as well as environmental and embedded street art. At the heart is a digital media program that connects visitors using pre-recorded storytelling, GPS, and digital pylons to bring the history of Provincetown’s cultural centers to life. About the Mass Cultural Council The Mass Cultural Council is a state agency supporting the arts, sciences, and humanities, to improve the quality of life in Massachusetts and its communities. It pursues its mission through a combination of grants, services, and advocacy for nonprofit cultural organizations, schools, communities, and artists. The agency's total budget for this fiscal year is $16.1 million, which includes a $14 million state appropriation and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. The Council also runs the Massachusetts Cultural Facilities Fund in partnership with MassDevelopment.


News Article | May 27, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Draperies are showing wear and tear prematurely due to dirt and dust accumulation, according to the CEO of New Dimension. New Dimension, who services the Boston and New England area, reveals that bacteria and various allergens that collect on draperies can affect health. Contaminates that linger on draperies have unsuspecting side effects on health, especially for those with sinus or respiratory conditions. Anthony Miklaszewski, CEO of New Dimension, says “pet hair and dander can cling to drapery fabrics, making your home appear unkempt and triggering allergies in family and guests. Pet debris can also leave behind odors that linger in the air.” Miklaszewski adds, “professional drapery cleaning works to remove accumulations of pet hair and dander to prevent allergens. Drapery cleaning may need to be done more often to keep hair and dander from building up. “ Many people neglect window treatments during routine house cleaning, causing them to appear dull and dingy. Professional cleaning techniques are important in protecting drapery investments. In recent months, there has been a demand for in home drapery cleaning. New Dimension is happy to announce that they can perform all drapery cleaning in home, while drapes remain in place. New Dimensions in home drapery cleaning guarantees that fabrics will be carefully inspected to determine the appropriate cleaning method. When drapes are cleaned using professional products, equipment, and techniques, the lifespan of the drape is doubled or in some cases tripled. New Dimension Fabric Protection and Cleaning was established 25 years ago. For those 25 years it has always aimed to provide simply the best eco-friendly cleaning & protection experience ever. When in home drapery cleaning is needed in Wellesley, Wellfleet, Winchester, or Wayland, remember that New Dimension has the greater Boston area covered. For more information about drapery cleaning, the place to visit is www.MyPureProtection.com. For more information, please visit http://www.mypureprotection.com/


News Article | August 7, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Researchers in Massachusetts this week captured footage of a great white shark feasting on a minke whale carcass, off the coast of Cape Cod. The sighting led to the temporary and precautionary closure of three popular tourist beaches. The shark’s appearance was part of a resurgence for the species along the north-eastern US Atlantic coast. Researchers attribute this to a rebound in the population of gray seals, a favorite great white shark food when dead whales are not on the menu. James Sulikowski, a professor of marine science at the University of New England in Portland, Maine, said: “They’ve been congregating in areas like the Cape because there’s a lot of food there, and they like that food. It’s a source for them, and they don’t have to work too hard for it.” In a statement, the Center for Coastal Studies (CCS) said that by Thursday the 11ft whale carcass was in “radically different condition” from its discovery the day before. “At least two white sharks were attending the whale,” it said, “and had removed the tongue, internal organs and most of the muscle. The carcass was still floating but was essentially little more than the spinal column and skull.” Beaches at Noons Landing, Cold Storage and Beach Point were subsequently closed to swimmers. Sulikowski is based approximately four hours north of Truro, where the white sharks were spotted eating the minke carcass. Since a slate of new conservation measures went into effect in the 1990s, he said, white sharks have also appeared near his patch of coast. “It would only make sense to see more and more sharks up our way, which honestly is a really good thing,” he said. “Everybody thinks there are these crazy sharks out to be raging predators, but they focus on the dead, the sick, the dying. They actually strengthen and cull older populations of seals.” In late July, a possible great white sighting off Duxbury beach, near Cape Cod, prompted a warning that beachgoers swam at their own risk. This week, another unconfirmed sighting placed a great white in Wellfleet harbor, while swimmers were whistled out of the water off Martha’s Vineyard. According to the Shark Research Foundation, however, only seven shark attacks on humans have been documented in Massachusetts since 1830. Three were fatal, all of them before 1936. Two were off Cape Cod. Great white sharks were portrayed as rare in the 1975 blockbuster Jaws, which was filmed on Martha’s Vineyard. Researchers now believe substantial populations congregate around the long hook of Cape Cod in summer before heading to Florida in winter. In the north, whale carcasses are a vital food source. In the 1980s, studies of shark populations indicated precipitous decline, by as much as 79% in the white shark’s case. Data from recent studies shows some populations have rebounded, especially around Massachusetts. In a 2014 study published in Plos One, researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association wrote: “The recovery of north-west Atlantic gray seal populations over the last decade and their increasing concentrations at specific sites along Cape Cod, Massachusetts, appears to be producing new localized summer feeding aggregations for white sharks.” Sulikowski said: “It’s not the doom and gloom, like it used to be. We’ve made great strides to protect those species. You can see they’re rebounding, which is good.” However, many tournaments still encourage shark fishing, especially along the north-east US coast. According to fishermen the Guardian spoke to last month at a tournament in Rhode Island, many such contests are difficult to police. “You’re always going to have species that need extra protection, just because of their past history,” said Sulikowski of the great white sharks. “We just need to make sure we reach out to other countries and continue this effect.”


But do costs outweigh the benefits of installing photovoltaic (PV) systems in every building? MIT spinout Mapdwell is answering that question by mapping solar potential for entire cities and providing a cost-benefit analysis for each rooftop. On Mapdwell's satellite-map website, people can click on an individual roof to receive information about installation price, energy and financial savings, and environmental impact. The idea is to "empower businesses and homeowners with information they need to go solar," according to the Mapdwell website. So far, Mapdwell has mapped eight cities across the U.S., including New York, San Francisco, and three in Massachusetts—Boston, Cambridge, and Wellfleet—as well as a few cities in Chile. Mapdwell is currently expanding to include all major metropolitan areas in the U.S. by year's end. Results from mapped cities indicate that, in general, solar panel installation is a "good investment" for long-term homeowners, says co-founder and technology co-inventor Christoph Reinhart, an associate professor of architecture and head of the MIT Sustainable Design Lab. "In Cambridge, for example, a good roof will get you your money back within seven years," he says. Of course, that's if you have a "good roof," Reinhart adds, which depends on a number of factors that Mapdwell takes into consideration. North-facing roofs get less sunlight that those facing other directions, especially south. But the main culprits for lowering efficiencies, Reinhart says, are trees and other sources of shading. "In the summer you want trees to lessen your air-conditional loads. But if your roof is heavily shaded, that's obviously not good for solar," he says. Mapdwell also provides city-level statistics on "high yield" potential solar capacity and other metrics, giving municipalities a clearer picture of the costs and savings of promoting solar power. For example, Mapdwell estimates Boston has about 1.5 GW of untapped solar capacity, Washington D.C. has 2 GW, and San Francisco has roughly 3 GW. New York City, on the other hand, has a whopping 11 GW solar potential. If that capacity were met, the solar panels would offset carbon emissions equivalent to planting 185 million trees, according to Mapdwell. To map cities, Mapdwell collects data from LiDAR-equipped planes—which survey urban topography using reflections from lasers to map the terrain—along with geographical and weather data. Additional analysis provides a detailed 3-D model of every rooftop layout. Data is fed into Solar System, Mapdwell's online mapping platform, which was developed at MIT and provides a higher resolution and greater accuracy than other mapping services, Reinhart says. On Mapdwell's website, each rooftop is covered with many color-coded dots that represent open areas for solar-panel installation. They range in color from bright yellow—representing the highest yields—to orange, to brown, which represents decreasing solar efficiency. Users can outline areas where they may want to install panels, or use a default mode that automatically highlights the most "high-yield" areas. They'll get specific numbers for the costs of installing a system, the payback time in years, the average monthly and annual revenue, and any tax credits earned. Also displayed are the energy savings equivalent to trees planted, offset carbon, homes powered, and metrics such as energy output, panel efficiency, and more. "It becomes very specific in telling you where to place the systems and what the local payback times are," Reinhart says. If interested, users can print or share comprehensive reports and contact installers directly through Solar System's interface. Reinhart started working on Mapdwell's core technology in 2011, when he became aware of solar-mapping tools that were cropping up for places such as Boston and New York City. "But when you looked in detail at the maps online, you saw funny things happening," he says. In other words, the algorithms were working solar radiation calculations that were outdated, inaccurate, or wrong. At the time, Reinhart's group had been mapping individual buildings for solar potential. Securing funding from the National Science Foundation, they built out this technology to assess solar potential for entire cities, focusing initially on Cambridge—"to be a good neighbor," Reinhart says. They presented results to the government, estimating that fitting the city's 17,000 rooftops with solar panels could generate roughly 30 percent of the city's electricity. This Cambridge study opened up Reinhart's eyes to the commercial potential of displaying solar rooftop data for home and business owners—and the importance of software design. "If we showed people what we were using, no one would get it," Reinhart says, laughing. Reinhart partnered with co-founder and current CEO Eduardo Berlin, a former colleague at Harvard University whose research centered around information-driven models for sustainability in the real estate market. Berlin worked on the company's plan and the platform's concept and design, including the popular color-coded dots. "You get real dollar amounts, which adds to the value of the system, but people process graphical information better than numbers," Reinhart says. "That color scheme is incredibly important and seductive." Their platform landed them unprecedented results in a 2014 case study for Wellfleet's Solarize Campaign. Within four months, 10 percent of Wellfleet's households had commissioned a PV system, "which is seven times higher than comparable solarize program results in other Massachusetts communities at the same time, under identical pricing and framework," according to Berlin. Using the platform for initial screening, installers presented quotes for 94 percent of sites visited. More than half of these proposals became contracts. That's the benefit of having detailed information about photovoltaic installations, Reinhart says: "You come to a site, only to be very sure that the site's good. Then half the time the owner says yes because they already know from Mapdwell how much it's going to cost." Mapdwell is currently scaling to cover large U.S. metropolitan areas in the next few months. Additionally, Mapdwell has developed tools based on its data to lower customer-acquisition costs for solar-power stakeholders "and ignite a market that is ready and eager for much faster growth," Berlin says. Back at MIT, Reinhart and the Sustainable Design Lab are now using similar tools for their newest project: a building-energy model of Boston, which estimates the citywide hourly energy demand loads down to the individual building level. "This is where we want to go forward in cities," Reinhart says. Explore further: Google can tell you if solar roof panels will pay off


News Article | February 5, 2016
Site: news.mit.edu

Nations worldwide are increasingly embracing solar power as an alternative electricity source for homes, buildings, and even the grid. Since 2008, installed solar capacity in the United States alone has grown 17-fold, from 1.2 to 20 gigawatts (GW), according to the U.S. Department of Energy. But do costs outweigh the benefits of installing photovoltaic (PV) systems in every building? MIT spinout Mapdwell is answering that question by mapping solar potential for entire cities and providing a cost-benefit analysis for each rooftop. On Mapdwell’s satellite-map website, people can click on an individual roof to receive information about installation price, energy and financial savings, and environmental impact. The idea is to “empower businesses and homeowners with information they need to go solar,” according to the Mapdwell website. So far, Mapdwell has mapped eight cities across the U.S., including New York, San Francisco, and three in Massachusetts — Boston, Cambridge, and Wellfleet — as well as a few cities in Chile. Mapdwell is currently expanding to include all major metropolitan areas in the U.S. by year’s end. Results from mapped cities indicate that, in general, solar panel installation is a “good investment” for long-term homeowners, says co-founder and technology co-inventor Christoph Reinhart, an associate professor of architecture and head of the MIT Sustainable Design Lab. “In Cambridge, for example, a good roof will get you your money back within seven years,” he says. Of course, that’s if you have a “good roof,” Reinhart adds, which depends on a number of factors that Mapdwell takes into consideration. North-facing roofs get less sunlight that those facing other directions, especially south. But the main culprits for lowering efficiencies, Reinhart says, are trees and other sources of shading. “In the summer you want trees to lessen your air-conditional loads. But if your roof is heavily shaded, that’s obviously not good for solar,” he says. Mapdwell also provides city-level statistics on “high yield” potential solar capacity and other metrics, giving municipalities a clearer picture of the costs and savings of promoting solar power. For example, Mapdwell estimates Boston has about 1.5 GW of untapped solar capacity, Washington D.C. has 2 GW, and San Francisco has roughly 3 GW. New York City, on the other hand, has a whopping 11 GW solar potential. If that capacity were met, the solar panels would offset carbon emissions equivalent to planting 185 million trees, according to Mapdwell. To map cities, Mapdwell collects data from LiDAR-equipped planes — which survey urban topography using reflections from lasers to map the terrain — along with geographical and weather data. Additional analysis provides a detailed 3-D model of every rooftop layout. Data is fed into Solar System, Mapdwell’s online mapping platform, which was developed at MIT and provides a higher resolution and greater accuracy than other mapping services, Reinhart says. On Mapdwell’s website, each rooftop is covered with many color-coded dots that represent open areas for solar-panel installation. They range in color from bright yellow — representing the highest yields — to orange, to brown, which represents decreasing solar efficiency. Users can outline areas where they may want to install panels, or use a default mode that automatically highlights the most “high-yield” areas. They’ll get specific numbers for the costs of installing a system, the payback time in years, the average monthly and annual revenue, and any tax credits earned. Also displayed are the energy savings equivalent to trees planted, offset carbon, homes powered, and metrics such as energy output, panel efficiency, and more. “It becomes very specific in telling you where to place the systems and what the local payback times are,” Reinhart says. If interested, users can print or share comprehensive reports and contact installers directly through Solar System’s interface. Reinhart started working on Mapdwell’s core technology in 2011, when he became aware of solar-mapping tools that were cropping up for places such as Boston and New York City. “But when you looked in detail at the maps online, you saw funny things happening,” he says. In other words, the algorithms were working solar radiation calculations that were outdated, inaccurate, or wrong. At the time, Reinhart’s group had been mapping individual buildings for solar potential. Securing funding from the National Science Foundation, they built out this technology to assess solar potential for entire cities, focusing initially on Cambridge — “to be a good neighbor,” Reinhart says. They presented results to the government, estimating that fitting the city’s 17,000 rooftops with solar panels could generate roughly 30 percent of the city’s electricity. This Cambridge study opened up Reinhart’s eyes to the commercial potential of displaying solar rooftop data for home and business owners — and the importance of software design. “If we showed people what we were using, no one would get it,” Reinhart says, laughing. Reinhart partnered with co-founder and current CEO Eduardo Berlin, a former colleague at Harvard University whose research centered around information-driven models for sustainability in the real estate market. Berlin worked on the company’s plan and the platform’s concept and design, including the popular color-coded dots. “You get real dollar amounts, which adds to the value of the system, but people process graphical information better than numbers,” Reinhart says. “That color scheme is incredibly important and seductive.” Their platform landed them unprecedented results in a 2014 case study for Wellfleet’s Solarize Campaign. Within four months, 10 percent of Wellfleet’s households had commissioned a PV system, “which is seven times higher than comparable solarize program results in other Massachusetts communities at the same time, under identical pricing and framework,” according to Berlin. Using the platform for initial screening, installers presented quotes for 94 percent of sites visited. More than half of these proposals became contracts. That’s the benefit of having detailed information about photovoltaic installations, Reinhart says: “You come to a site, only to be very sure that the site’s good. Then half the time the owner says yes because they already know from Mapdwell how much it’s going to cost.” Mapdwell is currently scaling to cover large U.S. metropolitan areas in the next few months. Additionally, Mapdwell has developed tools based on its data to lower customer-acquisition costs for solar-power stakeholders “and ignite a market that is ready and eager for much faster growth,” Berlin says. Back at MIT, Reinhart and the Sustainable Design Lab are now using similar tools for their newest project: a building-energy model of Boston, which estimates the citywide hourly energy demand loads down to the individual building level. “This is where we want to go forward in cities,” Reinhart says.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

GREENWICH, Conn., Nov. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Wellfleet Credit Partners ("Wellfleet") announced today the closing of a $406.1 million collateralized loan obligation ("CLO"), referred to as "Wellfleet CLO 2016-2." Wellfleet CLO 2016-2 represents the third CLO issuance for Wellfleet, the...


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fitch Ratings has assigned the following rating and Rating Outlook to Wellfleet CLO 2016-2, Ltd./LLC: --$260,000,000 class A-1 notes 'AAAsf'; Outlook Stable. Fitch does not rate the class A-2, B, C-1, C-2 or D notes or the subordinated notes. TRANSACTION SUMMARY Wellfleet CLO 2016-2, Ltd. (issuer) and Wellfleet CLO 2016-2, LLC (co-issuer) together comprise an arbitrage cash flow collateralized loan obligation (CLO) managed by Wellfleet Credit Partners, LLC. Net proceed


News Article | January 4, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Animal conservationists in Massachusetts have rescued 10 Risso's dolphins that got stranded in a local harbor at the beginning of the year. Members of the nonprofit group International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) responded to reports on Sunday, Jan. 1, about dolphins having been spotted in Wellfleet Harbor. At first, residents reported that there were three dolphins swimming in the harbor, but by the time the rescuers arrived, they discovered that there were actually more of the marine mammals. IFAW spokeswoman Kerry Branon said the animals may have been trying to catch some prey, leading them to get closer to the shore. According to Branon, rescuers tried to herd the dolphins using boats so that they could lead the animals back to open waters. When the tide went out, however, the dolphins suddenly found themselves stuck in a portion of the harbor. The rescuers then decided to enter the cold, muddy water, so that they could safely move the animals out of their predicament. Each one of the dolphins was placed on a stretcher then transported on trucks using special carts. Some of the Risso's dolphins were so large that it took 15 rescuers just to move them from the harbor and into the vehicles. "They are pretty big, and really quite heavy," Branon said. "It's a massive undertaking, 10 dolphins." Branon added that this was the largest stranding of dolphins that they have responded to. Before this, the IFAW had rescued another group of dolphins that became stranded in a cove close to Chequessett Neck Road in September. After securing the Risso's dolphins on the transport trucks, they were then taken to Corn Hill Beach in Truro, where they were set free in the ocean. The rescuers believe the favorable winds in the area will help the animals find their way back into open waters. Branon said the rescue teams received much helped from residents and local authorities in saving the stranded dolphins. Some even handed out mugs of hot cocoa to the rescuers so that they could make it through the cold winter day. Risso's dolphins took their name after Niçard naturalist Giuseppe Antonio Risso. Risso was the first to provide a description of the animals to the public. While some people also refer to the dolphins as grampus, this name is more often associated with their fellow marine mammals, the orcas. Male and female Risso's are known to reach lengths of up to 8.5 feet to 13 feet (2.6 to 4 meters) and weigh between 660 to 1,100 pounds (300 to 500 kilograms). These dolphins have a bulbous head with a vertical crease, and a beak that isn't easily distinguishable. They also have a long, sickle-shaped dorsal fin found in the middle of their backs. Adult Risso's can be differentiated from other dolphin species through their pale gray skin and the heavy scarring on their bodies. These dolphins often end up in tussles with others of their kind and with lampreys and cookie-cutter sharks, which serve as their prey. Despite not being considered an endangered species, Risso's dolphins are still protected through the Marine Mammal Protection Act. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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